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Maryland fcoou. 
Jmtotcnthy of Maryland Libra* 
College Park. Md. 



DO POT ciscin |TP 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



State Board of Education, 



SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1950 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



Of The 




.817 



STATE OF MARYLAND 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE 1950 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres. .. Cumberland MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

NICHOLAS OREM, Vice-Pres. . . .Hyattsville MRS. CURTIS WALKER Chevy Chase 

WENDELL D. ALLEN Baltimore RICHARD W. CASE Baltimore 

JEROME FRAMPTOM, Jr Federalsburg 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1201 Mathieson Building, Baltimore-2 

State Superintendent of Schools Telephone Operator I 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 

Ass't State Supt. for Vocational Education Statisticians 

JOHN J. SEIDEL WILLIAM C. FEADER, I 

Directors HELEN D. GEORGE, I 

MERLE S. BATEMAN, Certification, Ac- MARION FREYER, II 

creditation MRS. RHEABEL J.' JAFFE, II 
JAMES E. SPITZNAS, Instruction MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS, II 
DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN, Finance, Re- 
search Principal Account Clerks 

Supervisors MRS " GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 

GRACE L. ALDER, Elementary Schools m?NrHF ? R Sv n n 

ELIZABETH AMERY, Home Economics BLANCHE E. KEEN, II 

BRIAN M. BENSON, Finance Senior Account Clerk 

MRS. GERTRUDE N. BOWIE, School MRS. MARY C. HOOVER 

R L FLOYD CROMWELL, High Schools ^MARC A^^ATBATTPH 

^duci^on EVILBISS ' TeaCher High6r ^ d\ G US R IlL E CHA B RS UGH 

TH Sn M RfcSatfon RGUS ° N ' PhySiC31 CARRYE* HAMBURGER 

R CHRTSTTNF HOGAN Research MRS - HELEN C. KATENKAMP 

MRS GLAD?! T^HOPKIITC ^, Curriculum ELIZABETH McGINNITY 

PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools Senior Stenographers 

DWIGHT P. JACOBUS, Educational Serv- ALICE ALGIE 

ices to Industries MRS. RUTH D. ANTHONY 

HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Education BEVERLY L. BENNETT 

HARRY M. McDONALD, Agriculture DENA BORES 

EVELYN MILLER, Home Economics MARGARET C. BROOKS 

GEORGE T. PRATT, Surplus Property NORMA CHALK 

JAMES L. REID, School Plant HELEN P. ELLIS 

Assistant Supervisors MRS. SLYVIA ELY 

LEE W. ADKINS, Veterans On-the-Farm MRS. ERMA G. FUNK 

Program MRS. ANNA E. KlLi\Jt.K 

CHARLES V. AKELEY, Finance, Research M ARY KULINSKI 

CHARLES C. CONLON, Jr., Accreditation MAR THA LEE MARSH 

GEORGE M. CRAWFORD, Curriculum J£?!v2^ q?S>?m?^?S? 

GENEVA F. ELY, Editor of Publications JJpPbftty ?tfaS WAPPONFR 

AUSTIN E. GISRIEL, On-the-job Training MRS. BETTY JEAN WAGGONER 

RICHARD K. McKAY, On-the-job Training ZTTA W ALDERMAN 

M. ELEANOR RICE, Certification MRS - HAZEL B. WILKERSON 

ETHEL E. SAMMIS, Physical Education, Senior Typists 

Recreation MRS. VIRGINIA C. COOPER 

DOROTHY SHIRES, Elementary Schools MRS. ADELINE L. ROGAN 

Counselor-Clerk Senior Clerks 

EDWARD P. HAUHN MRS. VERDA K. McCLOW 

Consultant Architect MRS. CATHERINE L. OWINGS 

*F. J. THUMAN T . „. . 

Junior Clerks 

Auditor FLORENCE M. BRADY 

T. HOFMANN CLIFT MRS. RUTH E. LEECH 

Administrative Assistant I EDWIN S. STEWART 
RUTH E. HOBBS 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

1201 Mathieson Building, Baltimore-2 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 

LIONELL BURGESS, Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Ass't, Services for 
the Blind 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Guidance, Place- 
ment, Training 



* Part time. 



Counselor . 

MYRTLE E. CHELL, Tuberculosis Cases 
Medical Consultant 
*DEAN W. ROBERTS, M.D. 

2612 N. Charles St., Baltimore-18 

Stenographer-Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 

Senior Stenographers 
ANNE NUSINOV 
CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 



3 



Branch Offices, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 



Baltimore Branch 

1101 Mathieson Building, Baltmore-2 

District Supervisor 

THOMAS D. BRAUN 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

ERNEST C. ALLNUTT, Jr. 

CHARLES L. HILL 

FOY L. LUNSFORD 

IRWIN D. MEDINGER 

RUTH F. RING 

WILLIAM H. SCHOENHAAR 

H. SMITH SHUMWAY 
Stenographer-Secretary 

EMMA E. LUECKERT 
Senior Stenographers 

MILDRED R. ECK 

MRS. CRISTINE HATCH 

FRANCES PUSEY 
Receptionist-Clerk 

MRS. OLIVE MAYO 

Central Maryland Branch 

1221 Mathieson Building, Baltimore-2 
District Supervisor 

R. KENNETH BARNES 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

B. W. BARKER 
Senior Stenographer 

BELL M. SKLAR 



t At 108 Washington St., Cumberland 
j At Board of Education, Chestertown 



Western Maryland Branch 

170 West Washington St., Hagerstown 

District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
tJ. LEO DELANEY 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 

109 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
ROBERT L. BURTON 
tFRANK A. TARBUTTON 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. PAULINE P. DAWSON 
Southern Maryland Branch 
4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

District Supervisor 
MERL D. MYERS 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
HENRY D. DEVLIN 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. JANE J. HOFFMAN 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-1 



Director 

HELEN M. CLARK 
Supervisors 

MAE GRAHAM, School and Children's 
Libraries 

MRS. NETTIE B. TAYLOR, County and 
Institutional Libraries 
Counselors 

rVEN CASE, Readers' Counselor 
ELIZABETH McALLESTER, Technical 
Counselor 
Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON 
JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN, Assistant 
MRS. SUZANNE V. PEARCE, Senior Assist- 
ant 



Stenographer-Secretary 

MRS. LAURA M. GAITHER 
Senior Stenographer 

MARTHA J. KEYDASH 
Junior Stenographer 

JOHANN NIZER 
Senior Clerk 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER 
Senior Typist 

JOYCE STOECKER 
Junior Typist 

CATHERINE BORKOWSKI 
Clerk-Messenger 

LOUIS EDWIN MYERS 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 



EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg 



J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 

WILLIAM E. HENRY Bowie 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 



HOOPER S. MILES, State Treasurer, Chair- 
man 

JAMES J. LACY, State Comptroller 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., State Supt. of 
Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME, Supt. of Schools Mont- 
gomery County, Vice-Chairman 
ALTHEA FULLER, Principal, Allegany County 



J. P. MANNION, Director 
THOMAS I. HAYES, Executive Secretary 
MINNIE HAMILTON, Stenographer-Secretary 
HELEN M. KIRKMAN, Principal Clerk 
MRS. DOROTHY NEWTON, Accounting 

Machine Operator 
BERNADETTE DUFFY, Senior Typist 
MRS. BETTY GOODMAN, Senior Clerk 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS AND 
SUPERVISORS— JUNE 1950 



County Address 
ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Superintendent 

CHARLES L. KOPP 
Assistant Superintendent 

RICHARD T. RIZER, Secondary 
Director 

WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 
Supervisors 

LEWYN C. DAVIS, Junior High 
JANE E. BOTSFORD, Elementary 
MILDRED WILLISON, Elementary 
WINIFRED GREENE, Primary 
JULIUS D. LONNHOLM, Vocational and 

Adult Education 
JACK E. PLATT, Music 
RALPH E. KESSLER, Special Education 
MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, Cafe- 

JOSEPH T. DOWNEY, Buildings and 
Grounds 

ARTHUR G. RAMEY, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 
Directors 

R HAROLD McCANN, Maintenance 
MORRIS W. RANNELS, Transportation and 
Purchasing 
Supervisors 

HOWARD A. KINHART, Senior High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR, Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY, Elementary 
MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elementary 
LEVIAH DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES, Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational and 
Veterans Training 
♦DORIS CLEMENTS, Home Economics 
MARY F. FARRELL, Curriculum 
JOSEPH H. PEPPER, Buildings and Grounds 
MRS. RHODA LIEBERMAN, Cafeterias 
MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

BALTIMORE— Towson 

Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON 

Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH, Elementary 
JAMES B. O'TOOLE, Jr., Secondary 

Director 

WILLIAM T. WILLIS, Jr., Maintenance 
upervisors 
C. JAMES VELIE, Music 
OLIVE JOBES, Art 

HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 
MARY E. KELLEHER, Home Economics 
EDITH S. SHORE, Cafeterias 
ANNA MEEKS, Guidance 
T. M. GREENE, Business Subjects and 

Adult Education 
NORRIS A. KING, Junior High 
G. ALFRED HELWIG, Secondary 
HELEN E. HALE, Secondary 
JENNIE E. JESSOP, Elementary 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT, Elementary 
ANNA G. SHEPPARD, Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST, Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

♦MINNIE H. WOOLFORD, Colored Sec- 
ondary 

ARTHUR A. DICK, Transportation, Voca- 
tional Education 
HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personnel 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 
CALVERT— Prince Frederick 
Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 
Supervisors 

- CARMEN DELAPLANE, Elementary and 
High 

MRS. THELMA O. CORNISH, Colored 

Elementary and High 
C. ELIZABETH REIG, Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE— Denton 
Superintendent 

W. STEWART FITZGERALD 
Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON, Jr., High 
BEATRICE WILLIAMS, Elementary 
*MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Elementary 

and High 
JAMES P. HILL, Pupil Personnel 

CARROLL— Westminster 
Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS 
Supervisors 

JOHN F. WOODEN, Jr., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
♦PHILIP S. ROYER, Music 
MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST, Home Economics 
and Cafeterias 
*MAE E. PRINCE, Colored Elementary and 
High 

STUART WIDENER, Maintenance, Trans- 
portation 

MAYE E. GRIMES, Pupil Personnel 

CECIL— Elkton 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS 

Supervisors 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER, High 
OLIVE L. REYNOLDS, Elementary 
PAUL S. HYDE, Elementary 
♦RACHEL E. BOYD. Home Economics 
EDWIN H. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— La Plata 
Superintendent 

F. B. GWYNN 

Supervisors 

B. LUCILE BOWIE, Elementary 
JOSEPH C. PARKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. CECELIA E. FARRALL, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 

Superintendent 

W. THEODORE BOSTON 

Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER, High 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON, Elementary 
MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
JOHN T. COMER, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 

Supervisors 

DUVAL W. SWEADNER, High 
MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elementary 
A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Ele- 
mentary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Education 

and Health 
♦CHARLES C. T. STULL, Music 
♦CHARLES E. HENSON, Colored Elementary 
and High 



County Address 
RUTH MacVE\N, School Lunch 
GEORGE W. CULLER, Maintmance 
GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT— Oakland 
Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 
Supervisors 

FOSTER D. BITTLE, High 

MRS. CHARLOTTE E. BURRIER, Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 
OREN T. GRASER, Maintenance 
JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD— Bel Air 

Superintendent 

CHARLES W. WILLIS 

Assistant Superintendent 

BENJAMIN S. CARROLL, Secondary 

Supervisors 

DOROTHY A. MUDD, Junior High 
HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 
MRS. ANNE M. NOONAN, Elementary 
♦PERCY V. WILLIAMS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

*ESTELLA EVERETT, Pupil Personnel 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 

Superintendent 

JOHN E. YINGLING 

Supervisors 

MARY L. ROCKWELL, High 
R. FRANCES HAMILTON, Elementary 
MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
HARRY T. MURPHY, Pupil Personnel 

KENT — Chestertown 
Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 
Supervisors 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, High 
LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 
*MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. MADELEINE FENNELL, Pupil 
Personnel 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 
Assistant Superintendents 

RICHARD E. CARPENTER, School Prop- 
erty 

EDGAR M. DOUGLASS, Administration 
Directors 

WILLIAM B. MARKS, Transportation 
ELEANOR L. SMITH, Personnel and 

K. P. GRABARKIEWICZ, Maintenance 
GEORGE W. BARCEL, Custodial Services 
Supervisors 

MRS. FERN D. SCHNEIDER, High 
MRS. HELEN P. BREADY, High 
THOMAS W. PYLE, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
LILLIAN L. GORE, Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU, Elementary 
MRS. RUTH S. GUE, Elementary 
ALICE L. ROBINSON, Libraries 
MARJORIE BILLOWS, Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Education 
WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Industrial Ed- 
ucation 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Economics 

and Cafeterias 
C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum 
MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
EDWARD U. TAYLOR, Colored Elementary 

and High 

T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 



Part time in this position. 



County Address 
PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
Superintendent 

G. GARDNER SHUGART 
Assistant Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SCHMIDT 
Director 

THOMAS S. GWYNN, Jr., School Planning 
Supervisors 

JOHN P. SPEICHER, High 
ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Junior High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
A. MILDRED HOYLE, Elementarv 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED, Elementarv 
MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 7 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
ANGELA C. WEIXEL, Music 
MARY A. THOMPSON, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 

Education 
EMMA BOWMAN, Elementary 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial and Adult 

Education 

*M. GLADYS DICKERSON, Home Econom- 
ics 

ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, Cafeterias 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

WILLIAM W. HALL, Assistant in Colored 
Schools 

JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
MARIAN E. LOBDELL, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Superintendent 

FRANKLIN D. DAY 
Supervisors 

CARTER M. HICKMAN, High 

MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elementary 

MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Elemen- 
tary and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S— Leonardtown 

Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 

Supervisors 

CAREY E. LACEY, High 
E. VIOLETTE YOUNG, Elementary 
*MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home 
Economics, School Lunch 
RALPH S. WATERS, Colored Elementary 
HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
Superintendent 

C. ALLEN CARLSON 
Supervisors 

JOHN L. BOND, High 

MRS. ALICE MAE BEAUCHAMP, Ele- 
mentary 

*KERMIT COTTMAN, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES O. BURNS, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

TALBOT— Easton 
Superintendent 

J. WILLARD DAVIS 

Supervisors 

ARTHUR R. HIGGINBOTTOM, High 
M. LILLIAN CHEEZUM, Elementary 
*W. H. FAUNTLEROY, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 
Assistant Superintendent 

WILLIAM C. DIEHL 



County Address 
Supervisors 

WILBUR S. HOOPENGARDNER, Junior 
High 

PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY, Elementary 
ANNE H. RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Jr., Industrial Arts 
CATHERINE L. BEACHLEY, Guidance 
MRS. ANORMALLEE WAY, Home Econom- 
ics, School Lunch 
MARY E. BYER, Health 
EARL D. HUYETT, Buildings and Grounds 
RUSSELL KEPLER, Maintenance 
RICHARD MARTIN, Transportation 
WILBUR M. PHILLIPS, Pupil Personnel 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 



County Address 

Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 

Supervisors 

LESTER A. HALL, High 
LOUISE MITCHELL, Elementary 
MARIE A. DASHIELL, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES E. TILGHMAN, Pupil Personnel 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Superintendent 

PAUL D. COOPER 

Supervisors 

WILLIAM L. KLINGAMAN, High 
MARY A. WARREN, Elementary 
MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Personnel 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 9 

State Superintendent: "Education for Citizenship in a Democracy" 10 

Legislation Affecting Education 14 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 17 

Administrative Divisions of the State Board of Education: 

Instruction 24 

Certification and Accreditation 31 

Library Extension 37 

Vocational Education 42 

Vocational Rehabilitation 45 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 48 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools. .. 49 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools 50 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 53 

Births in Maryland 56 

Per Cent and Index of Attendance 58 

Grade Enrollment, Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 61 

Over-Ageness; Age-Grade Distribution 67 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 70 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 78 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 94 

Teachers by Subject 100 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 101 

Clerks in Schools; Janitors, Utility Men, etc 102 

Parent-Teacher Associations 103 

Teachers: by Certification, Sex, Summer School Attendance, Resignations, 

Turnover, Source 104 

Number Pupils Belonging, Average Salary per Teacher 121 

Number and Size of Schools 124 

Adult Education, Baltimore City Summer Schools 130 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 133 

Vocational Rehabilitation 134 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 136 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 140 

Cost per Pupil 142 

Salaries 149 

Vocational Program, Adult Education 151 

Transportation. 155 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 160 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 164 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 171 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 172 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 173 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 181 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 182 

State and County Health Program for School Children 185 

List on Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 187 

Index 232 



8 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1951 



HONORABLE WILLIAM PRESTON LANE, Jr. 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Lane: 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77 of the Laws of Maryland, the 
eighty-fourth "annual report, covering all operations of the State Department 
of Education and the support, condition, progress, and needs of public education 
throughout the State" for the school year ending June 1950, is herewith presented 
to you. 

During the year the new compulsory school attendance law became effective. 
This legislation raised the school-leaving age to sixteen for all pupils except the 
mentally or physically handicapped who are unable to profit from the existing pro- 
grams of instruction in the public schools. As a consequence of this law an in- 
creased number of Maryland youth will benefit from educational experiences at the 
high school level. Prior to September 1, 1949 some youths left school to enter 
employment if they had completed the sixth grade. In this connection I am 
pleased to call to your attention the excellent work which is carried on under the 
direction of the supervisors of pupil personnel and the visiting teachers in assisting 
youths "who are in trouble" or who exhibit emotional difficulties. Many youths 
of this type formerly made very mediocre progress or left school as soon as the law 
permitted. At present many of these problem cases are identified in the incipient 
stages and satisfactory adjustments have been developed for a high percentage of 
them. A higher per cent of the youth enrolled in our public schools are enjoying 
the satisfaction of success and happiness. 

Since the youth of today will be the citizens of tomorrow, I feel that it is 
incumbent upon us, the citizens of today, to safeguard our public schools, the 
vehicle by which American Democracy has been nurtured and made strong. 



Respectfully submitted, 



THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. 



Secretary-Treasurer 



State Board of Education 



Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Nicholas Orem, Vice-President 
Wendell D. Allen 
Richard W. Case 



Jerome Framptom, Jr. 
Mrs. Alvin Thalheimer 
Mrs. Curtis Walker 



9 



10 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



EDUCATION FOR CITIZENSHIP IN A DEMOCRACY 

{From an address delivered by the State Superintendent of Schools at the 
Maryland Educational Conference, April, 19 U9) 

The American Public School system has no counterpart in any 
other country in the world. Its establishment has its roots in a 
philosophy of government to which no other nation subscribes 
in equal measure. It is true that the principles of American de- 
mocracy are accepted by some nations, but in actuality they do 
not exist in the same form anywhere else. This point must be 
understood in order to have a full appreciation of the meaning 
and the purpose of the public educational system in America. 

When it is said that the schools are educating for citizenship 
in a democracy, the obvious implication is that our children are 
being inculcated with the moral values and the political princi- 
ples which we believe to be absolutely essential for the continued 
functioning of a democratic type of government. It is the task 
of educators to train a citizenry that has the capacity and the 
will to preserve and to foster our American democracy. 

The American system of government was based upon the 
theory that government exists for the benefit of all and that its 
permanence is contingent upon wise and intelligent decisions 
made only by enlightened, interested, and loyal citizens. It was 
necessary, therefore, that some program be established whereby 
people might receive the benefits of enlightenment. Our early 
leaders could not leave this matter to chance or to some fortui- 
tous arrangement. They had to initiate a system of public edu- 
cation, nation-wide in its application, consistent with the rights 
of the states, and open to everyone without restriction. 

Through the years there has been a gradual but rapid develop- 
ment in the program of public education. It is still imperfect; 
there are still many thousands of youth in this nation who do 
not receive the benefits of even a meager education. We have 
developed, nonetheless, the greatest system of public education 
in the history of the world. It is but a question of time before 
its privileges will be extended to every individual, possibly to a 
degree far beyond the concept of those who were responsible for 
its institution. There is no alternative if our democracy is to 
persist, for the public school system has a vital part to play in 
this respect. It has already more than justified itself. It has 
proved itself at all times a stabilizing force in our thinking and 
in our attitudes ; it has been a powerful force in the development 
of our resources ; it has been a bulwark in all our struggles. The 
fact that our nation has become the richest, the most powerful, 
and the most altruistic of all nations is not a coincidence. Our 
nation has developed to this extent because our public school 
system, by freeing the minds of our people, has loosened the 
whole force of our democracy to the solution of our problems. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



If we wish to continue our progress, it is necessary that we raise 
our sights ; it is necessary that we envision a degree of enlighten- 
ment far greater than we have had in the past, for as life be- 
comes more complex it demands more understanding, more ap- 
preciation of all the forces that impinge upon us. 

As educators we must have a thorough understanding and ap- 
preciation of all the forces that educate in order that we may 
discover through psychological and other means the extent to 
which these various forces operate in the development of any 
individual — in his physical growth, in his thinking, and in his 
attitude. 

Gestalt psychology is the foundation principle of our philoso- 
phy of education. In simple terms this means that we do not 
educate the different parts of the individual; we educate the 
whole individual. Although we have compartmentalized educa- 
tion, possibly to an extent that we do violence at times to the 
integrity of the individual, we must see the scheme as a whole. 
In the light of this, physical education, for instance, has a much 
broader concept than the mere development of the individual's 
health and physical body. It becomes much greater than de- 
veloping the biceps or certain physical habits. It influences the 
whole being. 

In line with this interpretation of education, the teacher 
should have a sound philosophy of life and a broad knowledge of 
the purposes of education. He should have a realization of both 
the purpose of his particular phase of instruction and the extent 
and the means by which it contributes to the development of the 
individual pupil. 

The purpose of education, then, is to discover, to catalogue, 
and to define clearly these influences on our lives, to discover the 
ways in which they operate, and insofar as possible bend them 
to a process which will develop the kind of individuals who will 
exemplify our intellectual, physical, moral, and spiritual values. 

Let us now consider what results we are actually realizing 
with respect to citizenship. Are we developing intelligent citi- 
zens? Do our graduates understand the principles of our form 
of government and possess a real appreciation of democracy as 
we conceive it? Despite the criticisms, despite the unreasoned 
and ill-considered remarks of certain people, the youth of our 
generation have a better realization of what democracy means 
than those of any other generation in the history of our nation. 
By comparison, the youth of today have a far greater regard 
for the rights of all people and a much stronger desire to give 
everyone equal opportunities, particularly in education. Our 
youth are practical liberals and they believe in the complete use 
of our institutions. 

Only a generation or so ago there was not universal acceptance 
of the principle of public education for all. There was a strong 



12 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



feeling that education, particularly high school education, should 
be restricted to the few. Even today, there are certain older 
individuals who believe that education beyond high school should 
be limited to a few ; they are unaware of the fact that it is limited 
and that great numbers of our youth who have the ability are 
denied the privilege because of forces beyond their control. It 
should be all too obvious to every thinking person that the safety 
and the permanence of our nation cannot be maintained unless 
the brain power of our youth is developed to its capacity. 

Every citizen must be self-supporting, insofar as possible. One 
of the purposes of education is to make it possible for every 
citizen to have certain skills and abilities that will enable him to 
make a respectable living. Democracy is not a system of govern- 
ment wherein a small or even a large minority constitutes the 
breadwinners and the supporters of all. Insofar as it lies within 
each one, he should be a self-supporting citizen. We should judge 
our system of education, in a measure, by the extent to which we 
have developed our youth to take their places in the world as 
self-supporting citizens. 

Furthermore, the graduates of the public schools must be 
civically intelligent. They must know not only in a theoretical 
but also in a practical way how our government is operated. They 
must appreciate and understand forces that play upon their gov- 
ernment — the forces that tend to destroy it and the forces that 
support it. They must understand the processes of representa- 
tive government and the factors that play a part in the passage 
of legislation. They must be willing to assume not only the re- 
sponsibilities of citizenship but also the obligations imposed upon 
them first as citizens and secondly as recipients of the state's 
or society's bounty. The development of such qualities of citizen- 
ship is one of the most important purposes of public education, 
for, if government in our democracy is based upon the consent 
of the governed, everyone has the obligation to participate in 
the government processes, and the extent of the participation 
is a reflection, in a measure, upon the quality of the education 
offered. 

We know now that an individual does not "learn" democracy 
simply by memorizing certain predigested facts of political sci- 
ence. The attitude which a person adopts with respect to the 
form of government under which he lives is the vital factor. We 
must ask ourselves what there is in the nature of our system 
of education that develops certain attitudes within our pupils. 
It must be remembered that the school is only one agency in the 
development of attitudes in individuals. Our thinking and our 
attitudes are the composite of all our experiences. On the other 
hand, we must recognize the fact that every pupil in our schools 
comes in contact with his fellows, his teachers, and a system 
that inherently has in it certain factors that will affect his atti- 
tudes. This must give us concern. In the first place, we must be 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



sure that our teachers have attitudes that are conducive to de- 
veloping those qualities we desire in our pupils. If we expect 
the pupils to be affected, as we must, by the personalities of our 
teachers, we must see to it that the teachers themselves possess 
those qualities that are desired, for we know that individuals 
learn both by precept and example, but probably more by the 
latter. If we expect children to be courteous, we must be cour- 
teous to children , if we expect children to be considerate, we must 
be considerate, if we expect them to be kind, we must be kind; 
if we expect them to be understanding, we must be understand- 
ing. We must see that the situation in our classrooms and every- 
where in our school is based upon these criteria. If we expect 
children to be democratic, we must see that democracy is prac- 
ticed in the school and classrooms. Conversely, if practices in 
the school are undesirable, we must expect undesirable traits in 
our pupils. In other words, the school's influence is far-reaching, 
for adults are simply more of what they were as children. 

All education, all phases of education, must contribute to the 
good of society as a whole and to the good of the individual. 
This educational principle applies with equal force to every as- 
pect of our educational program — vocational education, indus- 
trial arts, English, history, science, mathematics, the arts, music 
and the fine arts, as well as our school lunch program, the sys- 
tem of extracurricular activities, the whole atmosphere of the 
school, and the administration. Finally, we should examine the 
quality of the instruction in our schools. No teacher should be 
ignorant of the various types of democratic governments found 
both in America and the rest of the world. The professional 
training of teachers should include a study of the social forces 
which operate to make the attainment of democratic ideals and 
practices extremely difficult under certain conditions in many 
countries. 

In short, our schools in training the future citizens of a demo- 
cratic society must not only treat democracy as a philosophical 
concept of government but must also present it as a militant and 
successful way of life, fully capable of combating the social evils 
of unemployment, despair, and poverty anywhere in the world. 

The public has expressed great confidence in the public schools 
by the support it has given them. The people are constantly ex- 
pressing the desire for increased support and for improvement 
and expansion. Undoubtedly this is due to the achievements of 
the schools in the past. If we wish to continue to merit and to 
receive such support, we must demonstrate constantly that we 
are achieving the ends for which we teach. 



14 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Special Session — December 1949 

Calvert County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 4, Senate Bill 6, authorizes the County Commissioners of Calvert 
County to borrow $300,000 at a rate of interest not to exceed 3% per annum 
for the purpose of building a new consolidated elementary school for the 
North Beach — Chesapeake Beach — Randall Cliff area in the Third Election 
District of Calvert County, altering and remodeling the Fairview Con- 
solidated Elementary School, and expanding the facilities and buildings at 
Brooks High School in Prince Frederick. 

Bond Issues — Exemption from Taxation 

Chapter 5, Senate Bill 7, exempts from all State and local taxation the 
loans and interest payable thereon authorized by Chapter 502 of the Acts of 
1949 (General Public School Assistance Loan of 1949) and Chapter 1 of the 
Acts of 1949, Extraordinary Session (General Public School Construction 
Loan of 1949). 

General Public School Construction Loan of 1949— $50,000,000 

Chapter 1, Senate Bill 1, authorizes the creation of a State debt in the 
aggregate amount of $50,000,000, the proceeds thereof to be used to supple- 
ment the financing of the construction of public school buildings and public 
school facilities and the acquisition of such real estate or interest in lands as 
may be necessary in connection therewith for each of the counties of the 
State and the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore. 

This bill is essentially the same as Senate Bill 442, Chapter 488, passed 
by the 1949 regular session of the General Assembly. The significant change 
is the provision which reduces from 15 years to 14 years, from the date of 
issuance of certificates evidencing the loan, the time allowance for the coun- 
ties and the City of Baltimore to repay with interest and carrying charges 
the amount of financial assistance allowed under the provisions of this law. 

Maryland School for the Blind — Construction Loan 

Chapter 6, House Bill 1 repeals and re-enacts Chapter 683 of the Acts of 
1949 creating a State debt of $350,000 for the purpose of erecting and equip- 
ping a new building or buildings for the colored deaf and blind at the Mary- 
land School for the Blind. The changes relate to the provisions for levying of 
taxes to pay the interest on and principal of said debt. 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January 1950 

CHANGES IN ARTICLE 77 

School Attendance — Handicapped Children 

Chapter 76, House Bill 26, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, Section 
229 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1939 Edition) which 
is the law concerning the education of handicapped children. It changes the 
law to include mentally as well as physically handicapped children, and in- 
creases from $400 to $600 the amount which may be paid by the State toward 
the cost of teachers, special equipment, nursing, therapeutic treatment, and 
transportation for each handicapped child. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



OTHER LEGISLATION 
Charles County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 43, Senate Bill 116, authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Charles County to issue bonds for making additions, alterations and improve- 
ments to and for purchasing equipment for the schools of Charles County in 
an amount not to exceed $200,000 and bearing interest at a rate not to exceed 
4% per annum. All action shall be subject to the approval of a building 
committee of 5 persons. 

Dorchester County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 42, Senate Bill 112, authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Dorchester County to borrow not in excess of $3,000,000 at a rate of interest 
not to exceed 4% per annum for erecting new school buildings, purchasing 
land for new school buildings, paying architects and other professional fees, 
altering or repairing existing school buildings and equipping school buildings. 

Wicomico County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 35, Senate Bill 96, authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Wicomico County to borrow $175,000 at a rate of interest not to exceed 6% 
per annum for the construction, making additions to or improvements in, 
the equipment of, and the acquisition of sites for schools at or near Willards, 
Pittsville, and Salisbury. 

Wicomico County — Bond Authorization 

Chapter 58, Senate Bill 154, authorizes the County Commissioners of 
Wicomico County to borrow $700,000 at an interest rate not to exceed 6% 
per annum for the construction, completing the construction or aiding in con- 
struction, making additions and improvements to and equipping of schools 
in or near Salisbury. 

Bond Authorization 

Chapter 109, House Bill 179, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$3,372,700 which includes $150,000 for certain improvements at State Teach- 
ers Colleges and funds for improvements at various State-aided schools. 

Educational Institutions — Tax Exempt Ground 

Chapter 27, Senate Bill 64, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, Section 
7 (8) of Article 81 of the Annotated Code of Maryland. It increases the 
amount of tax exempt ground belonging to nonprofit educational institutions 
from forty acres to one hundred acres. 

Employment of Minors 

Chapter 8, Senate Bill 4, amends the Child Labor Laws of Maryland. 
Among other provisions, it states that no minor under 16 years of age may be 
employed during school hours, except a minor 14 or 15 years of age who has 
been found incapable of profiting by further instruction or a minor 14 or 15 
years of age who is participating in a school work co-ordination program. It al- 
so states that no minor under 16 years of age may be employed for more than 3 
hours on any school day, or for more than 23 hours in a week during which 
school is in session for 5 or more days. When school is not in session no 
minor under 16 years of age may be employed for more than 40 hours a week. 
No minor under 16 years of age shall be permitted to work before 7 A. M. or 
after 7 P. M. No minor of 16 or 17 years of age who is attending day school 
may be employed more than 6 days in any week or more than 4 hours on a 
school day, or more than 28 hours during any weeTc containing 5 or more 
school days. No minor of 16 or 17 years of age who is attending day school 
shall work before 6 A. M. or after 10 P. M. Employment certificates for 
any minor under 18 years of age must be made available to supervisors of 
pupil personnel. 



16 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



Upon the recommendation of the chief officer of the child's school or 
the complaint of any officer charged with enforcing this law, or any police 
officer, supervisor of pupil personnel, or probation officer of juvenile court, 
the license of any child who becomes delinquent or fails to comply with all 
legal provisions regarding school attendance may be revoked. Supervisors 
of pupil personnel are required to make complaints against any persons 
violating any of the provisions of this law and to prosecute the same. Nothing 
in this law is to prevent minors of any age from receiving industrial education 
which has been approved by the State Board of Education or other duly con- 
stituted public authority. 

The provisions of this law do not apply to employment in farm work or in 
domestic service in a private home provided such work is done outside of 
school hours. 

General Construction Loan of 1949 

Chapter 53, Senate Bill 142, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, 
Section 6 of Chapter 277 of the Acts of 1949 and repeals Section 7 of Chapter 
277 and enacts a new section to be known as Section 7. It amends in certain 
particulars the purposes for which the proceeds from the General Construction 
Loan of 1949 may be expended. It also amends the provisions for the levy 
of State taxes to meet the interest and principal of said loan, and makes 
said loan and interest thereon free from State, County and municipal taxa- 
tion. 

General Public School Assistance Loan of 1949 

Chapter 52, Senate Bill 141, which repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, 
Section 6 of Chapter 502 of the Acts of 1949 relates to the levy and collection 
of taxes to pay the interest on and principal of the General Public School 
Assistance Loan of 1949. The County Commissioners and the Mayor and 
City Council of Baltimore are required to levy State taxes for 1950 at one and 
two-tenths cents (1.2c) on each $100 of assessable property, for 1951 at 
one-tenth of one cent (.lc) and for 1952 and all succeeding years until all 
first installments of certificates issued under the act are redeemed, at five- 
tenths of one cent (.5c) to meet interest and principal on said certificates. 

Payment of Loans — Tax Rate 

Chapter 50, Senate Bill 139, provides that one-tenth of one cent (.lc) of 
the 1951 Maryland State tax rate on real property shall be for payment of 
principal and interest on the General Public School Assistance Loan of 1949, 
and three-hundredths of a cent (.03c) shall be for payment of principal and 
interest on the Maryland School for the Blind Loan of 1949. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

August 30, 1949 

Dr. Pullen called the attention of the Board to the fact that 
every public employee is required to sign a loyalty pledge and that 
signed copies of the oaths of the employees for whom he is responsible 
are on file in the proper office. 

Dr. Pullen also stated that, in accordance with the authorization 
of the State Board of Education, arrangements have been made to 
carry out the provisions of the legislative act relating to the educa- 
tional training of war orphans. Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell and Mr. 
Brian M. Benson have been designated to be in charge of this pro- 
gram. 

Three new supervisory appointments were made: Mr. George 
Pratt, School Lunch Program, effective September 1, 1949; Miss 
Evelyn Miller, Home Economics, effective November 1 (or earlier) ; 
and Mr. Dwight Jacobus, Industrial Education (Apprentice Train- 
ing), effective November 1, 1949 (or earlier). The following changes 
in assignments also were made : Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, changed from 
Supervisor of High Schools to Supervisor of Teacher and Higher 
Education; Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell, changed from Supervisor of 
Vocational and Education Guidance to Supervisor of High Schools; 
and Mr. Richard McKay changed from Field Supervisor to Assistant 
Supervisor of Accreditation. 

The State Superintendent presented a written report of the 
Maryland public school building construction program in the State, 
from January 1, 1947 to July 1, 1950. The total cost, including that 
of the Baltimore City program, during the period indicated, will 
be $100,905,588.84. 

Dr. Pullen stated that the standards for public school buildings 
which had been adopted some years ago are being revised by a com- 
mittee of superintendents and building experts. He requested 
authority to make variations from the present standards, pending 
final revision. The Board unanimously passed the following resolu- 
tion: 

Resolved: In view of the fact that the "Standards for Maryland School 
Buildings" has not been revised since 1941, and 

In view of the fact that recommendations from architects and builders 
indicate more economical and functional construction is possible, and 
In view of the fact that a committee of architects, builders, engineers, and 
county superintendents is considering recommendations for revisions of 
"Standards for Maryland School Buildings," 

The State Board of Education hereby authorizes the State Superintendent 
of Schools to make such exceptions to the "Standards for Maryland School 
Buildings," Revised 1941, as he deems wise, pending such time as the rec- 
ommendations for revision are approved. 

November 18, 1949 

The Board welcomed Mr. Richard W. Case, its newly-ap- 
pointed member. 



18 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



The Board passed a resolution of regret on the death of a former 
member, Captain Robert E. Vining. 

Dr. Pullen reported that he had been appointed a member of the 
Accrediting Committee of the American Association of Colleges 
for Teacher Education. 

The State Superintendent then presented to the Board a sum- 
mary of the Maryland State public school budget as it has been sub- 
mitted to the Budget Director. The summary was accompanied 
by a written explanation of certain items, and Dr. Pullen reviewed 
briefly the principal changes and the reasons for them. 

Dr. Pullen announced that the Board of Public Works had ap- 
proved applications for financial assistance from State funds for 
school building construction as follows: 

General Public School Assistance Loan (State Grant) 
$12,855,435.50; 

General Public School Construction Loan (State Loan) 
$17,789,368.95. 

The Board of Public Works also approved the floating of 
sufficient bonds to take care of school building needs as scheduled. 

A new school building code which had been tentatively ap- 
proved by the superintendents was adopted tentatively by the Board, 
pending further study. The code was drawn up by representatives 
of the State Department of Education, the county superintendents, 
the architects, the contractors, and a representative of the State 
Engineer's office. 

Dr. Pullen informed the State Board that he had appeared 
before the Legislative Council to discuss the problem of selecting 
local school board members. He, other school officials, and Parent- 
Teacher organizations, in opposing all local bills introduced into the 
Legislature on this subject, have advocated uniformity in the selec- 
tion of all school board members and have held that local exceptions 
would disturb the general principle. 

At Dr. Pullen's request, the Legislative Council appointed a 
committee to consider the subject. At a meeting held in the Board 
room of the State Department of Education on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 9, 1949, the Committee showed no sentiment in favor of the 
election of Board members, but expressed some interest in having the 
names of possible appointees screened before they were presented 
to the Governor. Dr. Pullen took the position that while the 
State Board would screen the names of persons suggested by county 
residents, the Board and he would prefer not to do so. The Com- 
mittee has made no recommendation but is continuing its study. 

Dr. Pullen informed the Board that the Board of Public Works 
has adopted a regulation to the effect that State institutions and 
departments, in addition to informing the State Treasurer relative to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



fire damages, must notify the Department of Public Improvements 
within twenty-four hours of any fire loss. A representative of 
that Department, with insurance company agents, will determine 
the scope of loss and initiate investigation. The Department of 
Public Improvements will then ask for bids for replacements. The 
Board of Public Works has decided, further, that service contracts 
(not to be confused with repairs) are to be handled directly by 
State institutions and departments without referral to the Board 
of Public Works or the Department of Public Improvements. Re- 
pairs will continue to be handled through the Department of Public 
Improvements. Dr. Pullen said that copies of these directives 
had been sent to the State Teachers Colleges. 

The Board approved Section V of the Regulations for the Ap- 
proval of Nonacademic Schools in the following revised form: 

V. Policies, Business Practices, and Ethics 

A. Persons shall not be listed or advertised as members of the faculty of 
the school unless thev are regularly employed to teach one or more of 
the regular subjects in the curriculum. 

B. If persons employed as lecturers or demonstrators are mentioned in 
bulletins or advertising letters, such persons shall be designated as 
lecturers or demonstrators; and if a course prepared by a well-known 
individual is offered by someone other than the person himself, it 
shall be clearly indicated that the course is given by a regularly- 
employed member of the staff. 

C. No officer or employee of any school shall knowingly solicit any student 
to leave an educational institution at which he is in attendance; nor 
shall an officer or employee of the school seek to induce any student to 
change his plans when such student has definitely enrolled in another 
school. 

D. The school shall refrain from exaggeration or misrepresentation of 
any kind in its advertising through its field representative or through 
any other agency. 

E. Sales representatives of schools should be selected primarily on the 
basis of ability and integrity and each representative should be given 
an adequate preliminary training. The school shall be responsible for 
any statements or commitments made by its representatives. 

F. The school may advertise that it is endorsed by manufacturers, business 
firms, organizations, or individuals engaged in the line of work for 
which it trains only if it can present written evidence of the endorse- 
ment or endorsements. 

G. The school shall not use "blind" advertisements to solicit prospective 
students, nor shall it advertise in the "help wanted" or other employ- 
ment columns in newspapers or other publications. All advertising 
shall be done in the name under which the school has been approved by 
the State Department of Education. 

H. The school shall not allow a student or prospective student a premium 
or other special financial inducement for registration. 

I. No school shall offer financial aid and scholarships to students except 
upon the following basis: 

1. Bona fide loans may be granted to worthy and needy students. 

2. Financial aid (so-called "work" or "service" scholarships) may be 
granted provided the duties performed are bona fide and the re- 
muneration paid is not in excess of current local rates for compara- 
ble services. 



20 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



3. Funded scholarships, from sources other than the current operating 
budget of the school, may be granted upon the following conditions: 

a. The value, number, and source of such scholarships shall be 
printed in the school catalog. 

b. They shall be applied for in writing by scholarship candidates 
and awarded by the head of the business school (or an execu- 
tive committee thereof) on a truly competitive or merit basis. 

4. Scholarships shall not be used as a subterfuge to secure enrollments. 
J. The school shall not misrepresent employment opportunities either 

orally or in writing and shall not directly or by implication guarantee 
positions. The school may mention the number of positions and the 
specific positions in which graduates of the school have been placed. 
The school shall take no credit for placements made through licensed 
employment agencies. 
K. The school shall not misrepresent probable earnings in the field for 
which it trains nor shall it feature top salaries earned by a few workers 
in the particular field. The school shall not advertise average wages 
per hour in excess of the average wage that graduates of their own 
school or similar schools have earned during the first year of employ- 
ment. 

L. No fees shall be accepted for placing any student or graduate. 

The Board approved a change in one paragraph of the require- 
ments for nonpublic tutoring schools. The paragraph was changed 
to read : 

Any type of certificate given must be approved by the State Superintendent. 

This amendment had been submitted to the tutoring schools, 
and they had registered no objection. 

Dr. Pullen brought to the attention of the Board a resolution 
of the Board of School Commissioners of Baltimore City, expressing 
the intention of the Board to discontinue Coppin Teachers College 
at the end of the current school year and requesting the State to 
assume the responsibility of providing for the education of colored 
teachers for Baltimore City. A letter stating this resolution had 
been sent to the Governor as well as to the State Board of Educa- 
tion. The Governor replied that he was referring the letter to the 
President of the State Board of Education and the State Superin- 
tendent for advice. These two officials advised the Governor that a 
study would be made but that there should be no difficulty in 
absorbing the students from the Coppin Teachers College. 

February 28, 1950 

The Board adopted a resolution expressing its sorrow at the 
death of Mr. Thomas Haven Chambers, a member of the State 
Board of Education from 1920 to 1938. 

At the request of the State Superintendent, the Board rescinded 
the following resolution, which was passed on February 16, 1934: 

Resolved: That any Maryland institution which wishes the approval 
of the State Board of Education as a standard college and/or authority to 
issue the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, must first qualify 
for approval by the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the 
Middle States. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



This resolution is not operable in view of the fact that the 1947 
law forbids any educational institution, with certain exceptions, to 
operate in Maryland until it is approved by the State Superintendent. 
The Middle States Association does not approve a college until it 
has graduated one or two classes, and the foregoing resolution 
prevents the State Superintendent from allowing a new college 
to open its doors. 

Dr. David W. Zimmerman was appointed Assistant Superin- 
tendent in Finance and Research, effective March 1, 1950. The 
board accepted the resignation of Mrs. Marie Wheatley Meier, 
Supervisor of Special Education, effective December 31, 1949. 

The Board tentatively approved revisions of By-law 70 which 
fixes the ratio of students per teacher in the State high schools. 

The Board approved the kindergarten-primary course which 
is now being offered at the State Teachers College at Towson. 

The State Superintendent reported that the students at the 
State Teachers College at Towson have requested permission to 
bring a foreign exchange student to the College. The students will 
be responsible for the expenses involved. The Board granted the 
request, provided the Attorney General sees no objection to the 
procedure. 

The State Superintendent informed the Board that the American 
Association of Colleges for Teacher Education had recently accre- 
dited the State Teachers College at Bowie. All four of the State 
Teachers Colleges are now accredited. 

June 8, 1950 

The State Superintendent reported that he had ordered a re- 
survey of all educational nonpublic institutions approved by him. A 
consolidated report of the resurvey will later be sent to members of 
the State Board. 

The Board passed a resolution with the following provisions: 

(a) No person, firm, association, or corporation (other than a bona fide 
church organization) shall use the name "school," "institute," "col- 

. lege," "university," or word of like import, in such manner as to con- 
note the offering of a program of college, professional, preparatory, 
high school, junior high school, elementary, kindergarten, nursery 
school work, or any combination thereof, or a program of trade or 
technical education, or both, in the fields of trade or industry, unless 
such person, firm, association or corporation shall have first obtained a 
certificate of approval from the State Superintendent of Schools in the 
manner provided by Section 14A of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1947 Supplement). 

(b) This regulation shall not apply to any person, firm, association or 
corporation using any name specified in sub-section (a) hereof, at the 
time of the adoption of the Regulation, nor to any corporation operating 
a school or college under a charter granted by the Legislature of Mary- 
land. 



22 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



The Board passed the following by-law: 

By-Law 73: In view of the shortage of qualified elementary school 
teachers, during the school years 1950-53 Junior High School Teachers' 
Certificates shall be valid for teaching in the elementary schools. Teachers 
holding such certificates who continue to teach in the elementary grades 
shall qualify for Bachelor of Science Certificates in Elementary Education 
within six years of the dates of appointment. 

The Board revised By-law 67 to read as follows: 

Certificates for librarians in the county libraries shall be issued under the 
following titles: 

County Library Administrator 
County Librarian of Special Services 
County Branch Librarian 
Library Assistant 

Any of these certificates, valid for three years in a Maryland county library, 
may be issued to a graduate of a college which has been approved for the 
training of librarians by the American Library Association or by the Mary- 
land State Board of Education, provided such applicant has completed a 
full year or thirty semester hours of work in Library Science, provided the 
applicant passes the special medical examination, and provided the ap- 
plicant has been tentatively appointed to a position for which the particular 
certificate is required. 

These certificates may be renewed for four years, then for six-year periods, 
upon evidence of successful experience and professional spirit. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to issue War 
Emergency Certificates for the year 1950-51 to applicants who do 
not qualify for regular certificates and who are needed to fill teaching 
positions in public schools, pending the availability of qualified 
applicants. 

Changes in the State Plan for Vocational Education were 
adopted to allow for the replacement of an auditor by a State Super- 
visor and the possible addition of other supervisors. 

Dr. Pullen reported that upon the advice of the Attorney- 
General, By-law 70 be rescinded in the form in which it existed prior 
to the revisions approved by the State Board on February 28, 1950. 
The By-law fixes the ratio of students per teacher in the State high 
schools. The Board approved this action. 

The Board approved the following changes in positions, effec- 
tive July 1, 1950: Miss Geneva Ely, changed from Assistant 
Supervisor-Editor of Publications to Supervisor of Special* Educa- 
tion, and Miss Dorothy Shires, promoted from Assistant Super- 
visor to Supervisor of Elementary Schools. Mr. George Myers was 
appointed Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program, effective 
July 1, 1950. 

The Board accepted the resignation of Mr. George T. Pratt, 
Supervisor of School Lunch Program, effective June 30, 1950, and 
of Mr. Austin Gisriel, Assistant Supervisor of Related Instruction, 
effective July 20, 1950. Mr. Pratt resigned to become principal of 
the Clark School for the Deaf in Massachusetts and Mr. Gisriel to 
enter other work. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



Upon the recommendation of Dr. Pullen, the Board authorized 
a survey of the needs in Maryland in the field of education for 
handicapped children. The study will consider not only the pro- 
gram which should be offered by the public schools but also the 
other educational facilities available in the State. The Board auth- 
orized the employment of such outside experts as may be necessary 
to assist and the payment for such services out of the funds provided 
in the budget. 

The Board approved Dr. Pullen's recommendations relative 
to Coppin Teachers College as follows: 

1. That the State Board of Education, recognizing the fact that there is 
need for between fifty and sixty-five colored elementary teachers an- 
nually in the Baltimore area, recommend to the Governor and to the 
General Assembly of Maryland that the State Board of Education 
continue the training of elementary teachers in Baltimore City, and 
that sufficient funds be appropriated for the State Board to acquire 
the necessary physical facilities for the operation of a college of ap- 
proximately three hundred students, that tentatively the State Board 
take the position that this school be a day school without dormitory 
facilities, and that the college be open to all qualified colored students 
within commuting distance. Further, that the State Superintendent 
of Schools and his staff be directed to continue to study the situation 
further with such advice as may be desired, and report to the Board 
later as to the specific proposals for the implementation of this rec- 
ommendation. Incidentally, attention should be called to the fact that 
regardless of the arrangements made additional building must be pro- 
vided. 

2. That in view of the fact that the continuation of the institution is 
recommended by the State Board, the State Superintendent be author- 
ized to admit a limited number of freshmen to Coppin in September 
1950, the limitation to be determined by the adequacy of the physical 
facilities of the institution, the fact being recognized by the State 
Board that there has been a limit of fifty entering students each year 
at Coppin in the past. 

3. That the State Superintendent be empowered to complete arrangements 
for the operation of the College for the three classes presently enrolled 
at Coppin, and that these arrangements consist in selecting the faculty, 
preparing the budget, and securing the necessary funds from the 
Governor for the operation — it being understood that the physical 
and other arrangements pertaining to the operation of the institution 
will be consistent with the policies in the other teacher training in- 
stitutions of the State, provided, however, that special exceptions, 
because of the exigencies of the situation, may be made upon approval 
of the Board. 

4. That in "taking over" the faculty the State Superintendent be author- 
ized to deviate from the salary schedule for colleges as may be necessary 
in order not to decrease anv salary now paid to any instructor or 
official, and further that he be authorized to designate such titles as 
he may in his judgment deem advisable for the officials of the College. 



24 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

In the summers of 1945, 1946, and 1947, the State Department 
of Education had, through joint planning with county school ad- 
ministrators, operated curriculum workshops at Towson State 
Teachers College. By means of this arrangement, the Department 
had given impetus and direction to a State-wide revision of the 
curriculum necessitated by the development of a twelve-grade sys- 
tem in all the counties of the State. 

In the summers of 1948 and 1949, many of the counties operated 
their own workshops to make possible participation by a maximum 
number of teachers and to determine from local conditions and needs 
the kinds of activities and data which should constitute the various 
courses and educational projects. In these years the State Depart- 
ment began, more and more, to shape its services and resources to 
harmonize with local developments. The Department's major 
contributions, in the year 1949-1950, to the implementation and 
co-ordination of local and county programs may be summarized 
under the following heads: (a) extension and refinement of the arts 
program; (b) development and distribution of essential resources; 
(c) strengthening and adapting the program of teacher education, 
both pre- and in-service, to conform with changes in the public 
school program; (d) extension and improvement of the program of 
evaluation. 

The Arts Program 

a. Extension and refinement of the arts program. The child 
study program, now in its fifth year of operation in the State as the 
major element in the program of in-service teacher education, had 
convincingly demonstrated that what the child needs to learn most 
urgently is determined by his own growth needs — by the demands 
made upon him by his own organism as it matures and develops and 
by his own culture. These demands, both personal and social 
in their nature, comprehend all the arts — the language arts, the fine 
arts, the social and physical arts, and the practical or technical arts. 
As an expression of his own nature and of the patterns of life in his 
community, the child has to learn to walk; to run; to climb; to swim; 
to play games; to talk; to sing; to read; to write; to compute; to 
dance; to draw; to build swings and playing fields and bird houses 
perhaps; to maintain the rhythm of rest and motion, food taking 
and digestion, sleeping and waking; to effect satisfactory associa- 
tions with the opposite sex; to adjust and, in some measure, control 
the mechanisms of today's world; to come to an understanding of 
his complicated and complex society; to belong to his peer groups 
and, with increasing success, to the adult community; to espouse 
values that will stand him and his society in good stead; and to 
come to grips with the process of growing older, of aging happily. 
In the acts of living, the arts are united. 

In deference to this truth, the Division of Instruction explored, 
in this year 1949-1950, the possibility of projecting the principles 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



and premises of the child study program to include the language arts 
and the fine arts. Dr. Emmett Betts and Mrs. Marjorie Johnson 
of the Reading Clinic of Temple University spent one day with the 
Division reviewing the approaches and concepts so closely identified 
with child study and probing their implications for language arts 
as a part of teacher education. These discussions were in anticipa- 
tion of the time when the in-service teacher education program in 
the language arts might be made an integral and operating part of 
the child study program. 

In the feld of music, the Division explored this possibility 
even more vigorously and more fully. Dr. James L. Mursell of 
Teachers College, Columbia University, was employed as consultant 
to help in a study of the music program now in effect in county 
schools and to make recommendations for its improvement. Dr. 
Mursell visited music classes in twelve of the twenty-three counties 
and there observed programs which were representative of the total 
range of practices in the State. The major emphases in Dr. Mur- 
sell's report were placed upon the recommendations that (1) a 
complete program of music in the schools involves fve major types 
of activities, to wit, singing, playing, bodily movement, listening, 
and creating; (2) introduction of performance on the standard in- 
struments is desirable and feasible in the intermediate grades. 
Specifically, this means class instruction in instruments of the wood- 
wind, string, and brass families, and also in piano. Such classwork 
should be on an opportunity basis; (3) the program in the junior 
high school should be that of a continuing general program, with 
emerging specialities grouped around it; (4) the same type of pro- 
gram is appropriate for the senior high school; (5) the classroom 
teacher must have the guidance of the music specialist to clarify 
and define purposes, to make available materials and devices, to 
carry on workshop activities, and to provide opportunities for 
personal musical development. 

A key to Dr. Mursell's thinking is found in the following para- 
graph excerpted from his report: "All these special activities, 
however, should come to a focus in the work in general music. The 
controlling conception of general music should be the promotion of 
music as a significant area of human culture, this being brought 
about by many-sided activities and experiences, and enriched by 
contact with whatever musical specialities may be carried on in the 
school. The primary aim, that is to say, should be cultural and 
social rather than technical, for it may be confidently expected that 
children who join the various specialized performing organizations 
on a basis of enthusiasm and interest will develop the requisite 
techniques readily enough, this being particularly true of the 
techniques involving the notation/' 

Plans were immediately made in the Division to follow through 
on these recommendations, first, by seeing that they were presented 
and their implications made clear in supervisory and other con- 
ferences and, second, by projecting a series of State and regional 



26 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



workshops devoted to increasing the "know-how' ' of supervisors and 
teachers in the music area. 

A beginning was made also in the building of the program of 
physical arts in this same way. Dr. Thomas C. Ferguson, Super- 
visor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation in the Depart- 
ment, in co-operation with the professional staff in Allegany county, 
sought to effect pilot practices which would define a direction for 
other counties in the State. First, specialists employed to serve as 
consultants elaborated the significance of the premises and prin- 
ciples of child study for the total general education program. Com- 
mittees were then organized which were representative not only 
of the various sections of the county but also of service agencies 
other than education and of interested citizens as well as of teachers 
and supervisors. These committees attempted to identify all the 
elements in a fully effective program of health, physical education 
and recreation, to determine the elements already present, and to 
project plans for overcoming deficiencies. 

The Division of Instruction plans to approach in the same way 
the development of the fine and practical arts in a general education 
program for all pupils. 

Essential Resources 

b. Development and distribution of essential resources. Dur- 
ing the year, 1949-1950, the Department spent $4,194.40 for the 
purchase of audio-visual materials, their cataloguing and servicing. 
In June, 1950, there were on hand in the Library Extension Division 
91 films, 66 film strips, and 46 recordings. Forty-six films were on 
order following careful previewing. In addition, the Department 
had had made 100 slides on fall gardening from a second-grade 
project at Glen Burnie, 27 slides on nutrition from a second-grade 
project at Pumphrey, and 57 slides on healthful living from a 
third-fourth grade project at Bowie. 

The Supervisor of Curriculum of the State Department of 
Education reported that during the year and a half that the State 
Film Library had been in existence 1,302 showings of the films had 
been scheduled. Films most in demand were those on "Human 
Growth" and the Teachers College films. The county boards of 
education and the senior high schools, more than other groups, have 
scheduled films for showings. 

Because of the need for materials on Maryland, each county is 
engaged in a one-year program to take and develop 24 black and 
white pictures, 8"xl0", of types of living in that particular county, 
each picture to be accompanied by a written explanation. The 
pictures are to represent the six areas of history, geography, in- 
dustry and occupations, scenic, social, and unique. Materials such 
as films and flashbulbs were purchased by the Department and sent 
to the counties. 

A resource bulletin depicting life in the local community is be- 
ing developed in each of the counties. In each instance, the bulletin 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



contains pictures, graphs, and charts. It is written on the level of 
junior high school pupils. The information relates to the people 
living in the county — who they are, where they live, how they make 
a living, and what health facilities they enjoy. The project of 
developing the bulletin is to be a co-operative one worked out by 
supervisors, teachers, pupils, and people in the community. These 
participants, of course, need training in how to do research, how to 
write, and how to check for accuracy. To meet this need, the 
Division of Instruction secured the services of Dr. Rudolph Flesch 
and Mrs. Amy Cowing, both specialists in the f eld of "readable 
writing," to work with the county personnel who are responsible 
for producing the county resource bulletin and for assuring that 
it is intelligible to junior high school pupils. 

Besides these specialists and county and State personnel who are 
available for continuing service, there are in our specialized institu- 
tions and agencies in the State, in our teacher education colleges, 
and in our local communities potentially valuable personnel and 
material resources which should be identified and plans made for 
their systematic use in the development of appropriate courses and 
projects. In this program of carefully planned identification of 
resources and their consistent use in the program, the State Teachers 
Colleges are placed strategically to operate as mobilization centers. 
In the furtherance of this conception, the Department invested 
approximately $700 in materials for these centers designed to demon- 
strate the kinds of essential resources which must be available at 
the Colleges when they play their parts completely in the on-going 
program of teacher education. 

Teacher Education Program 

c. Strengthening and adapting the program of teacher educa- 
tion, both pre- and in-service, in conformity with changes in the 
public school program. In November, 1949, Dr. H. L. Caswell of 
Columbia University visited Towson and Bowie State Teachers 
Colleges, consulted with members of the staffs of the Colleges and 
of the State Department of Education, and made suggestions for 
further developing and strengthening the program of teacher educa- 
tion in these institutions. His suggestions included (1) a closer 
interrelationship between the professional and liberal arts offerings 
in the Colleges; (2) closer functional interrelationships among the 
professional offerings; (3) use of the campus school for laboratory 
experiences and child study; (4) provision of working relationships 
with children in every year of the program ; (5) use of teachers col- 
leges as centers for the mobilization of personnel and material re- 
sources; (6) an inventory of the economic and educational status of 
youth in the community in anticipation of an economic recession. 

In October, 1949, Dr. Harold F. Clark of Columbia University 
and Dr. Howard Anderson of the U. S. Office of Education visited 
Bowie State Teachers College for the purpose of considering the 
relationships of offerings to the conditions of living of those taught 



28 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



by the graduates of this school. The gist of the combined judgment 
of these two specialists is given in the following statement: 'The 
teacher education program in all its aspects, including the academic 
and professional programs and also the program of the demonstra- 
tion school and affiliated practice centers, should take its orientation 
from and be conditioned by the quality of living which obtains in 
those areas served by the teacher graduates of the college. Some 
prerequisites for the achievement of such a program are, (1) specific 
knowledge of the conditions which now obtain in the community; 
(2) specific knowledge of the resources available for the improvement 
of these conditions; and (3) the understandings, skills, and pro- 
cedures which teachers must have for relating these resources to 
needs. Bowie enjoys unusual opportunities for meeting these pre- 
requisites in its teacher education program." 

During the week, January 16 to 20, 1950, the elementary and 
high school supervisors of the State met at State Teachers College, 
Towson, to consider the competencies the teacher should bring to 
the teaching job and the competencies supervisors should help 
teachers develop. Seven discussion groups were organized at the 
conference, each of which concerned itself with the role of the 
supervisor, the responsibilities of the supervisor, the problems of the 
supervisor, and recommendations. College staff members and 
county supervisory groups shared judgments and experiences and 
contributed to the clarification of their respective responsibilities 
in the development of fully competent teachers. 

As in the preceding four years, the child study program con- 
tinued to be the most important phase of the in-service teacher 
education program. On September 15 and 16, 1949, Dr. Daniel A. 
Prescott, Director of the Institute for Child Study, University of 
Maryland, appeared before the county Superintendents of Mary- 
land in the board room of the State Department of Education and 
summarized the child study program to date. In his presentation, 
Dr. Prescott stressed certain basic concepts: (1) children need help 
in meeting developmental tasks; (2) the teacher operates on the 
basis of information about each child; (3) the teacher needs integra- 
tion of knowledge from many sciences in order to understand the 
behavior of children; and (4) the teacher needs to develop skill in 
group dynamics. 

The child study program in Maryland was initiated in 1945. 
In 1945-1946, there were 253 colored and 1,047 white participants. 
In 1946-1947, there were 609 colored and 1,742 white participants. 
In 1947-1948, there were 867 colored and 2,980 white participants. 
In 1948-1949, there were two kinds of participation : (a) there were 
559 colored and 2,326 white teachers who continued participation, 
and (b) those who had finished three years of participation worked 
on implications for the curriculum. In 1949-1950, 600 colored and 
white teachers participated in the first-year program; 516 colored and 
white teachers in the second-year program; and 803 colored and 
white teachers in the third-year program. A total of 1,919 colored 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



and white teachers participated in the child study program for this 
current year, 1949-1950. 

In the years ahead the implications of the child study program 
must be explored more fully and sensed more keenly. Dr. Prescott 
in his presentation to the superintendents suggested that (1) changes 
should be made in the elementary school program, for it is heavily 
loaded with social studies for which the children are not yet ready. 
Children on this level are more interested in the world about them, 
i.e., in physical science; (2) changes should be made in the secondary 
school for it is heavily loaded with mathematics and science, while 
the pupils are particularly interested in vocations and matters 
dealing with social relationships; (3) the procedures used in physical 
education should be changed to prevent rigid adult control and to 
allow more free activity on the part of the pupil participants; (4) 
we should not stigmatize the pupil who cannot learn something at a 
specific time. We should so place and time various experiences that 
each pupil will realize the objectives which society has set. 

Recognition should be given also to a growing interest in a child 
study program for parents. This interest should undoubtedly be 
exploited and plans made to establish parent-child study classes as a 
major element in the program of adult education. 



Evaluation Program 

d. Extension and improvement of the program of evaluation. 
This year, the Department, with the aid of representative personnel 
from the counties, revised the State testing program. The minimum 
program arrived at after considerable study and exploration of all 
the possibilities consists of the following tests and schedules: 



Grade Date to be given 

1 September — second 

week of school 
3 January or February 

3 November 

6 January or February 
6 November 

9 First Quarter 
9 First Quarter 



Name of test 

Lee-Clark Reading Readi- 
ness Test 

Progressive Achievement 
Tests, Primary Battery, 
Form A 

New California Short- 
Form Test of Mental 
Maturity, Primary '47 
S-Form 

Progressive Achievement 
Tests, Elementary Bat- 
tery, Form A 
New California Short 
Form Test of Mental 
Maturity, Elementary 
'47 S-Form 

Progressive Achievement 
Tests, Intermediate Bat- 
tery, Form A 
New California Short 
Form Test of Mental 
Maturity, Intermediate 
'47 S-Form 



Publisher 
California Test Bureau 

California Test Bureau 
California Test Bureau 

California Test Bureau 
California Test Bureau 

California Test Bureau 
California Test Bureau 



30 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



9 Last Quarter 



Kuder Preference Record Science Research 

Associates 

Progressive Achievement California Test Bureau 
Tests, Advanced Battery, 
Form A 

New California Short California Test Bureau 
Form Test of Mental 
Maturity, Advanced '47 
S-Form 

Kuder Preference Record Science Research 

Associates 

General Education De- Cooperative Test Di- 
velopment Tests vision of the Educa- 

tional Testing Service 



11 First Quarter 



11 First Quarter 



11 Last Quarter 



12 Last Quarter 



The testing program provides school people with objective 
bases for curriculum planning. These include data or individual 
differences in interest, ability, and aptitude, which serve as bases for 
guidance programs and for a variety of adaptations which should be 
made within the program to meet individual needs. The program 
is not, and cannot be the means of promoting standardization, uni- 
formity, or odious comparison. 

Since it relates to the more tangible outcomes of education which 
lend themselves to objective measurement, it is only one part of the 
program of evaluation. Still more comprehensive are the ways and 
means employed to evaluate less tangible outcomes — attitudes, dis- 
positions, habits of thinking, and behavior patterns. In recognition 
of this truth, the Department in 1948-1949 and 1949-1590 prose- 
cuted a program designed to develop a broad evaluative instrument. 
The spring conferences of 1949 and 1950 were devoted to this ob- 
jective. The values which should be derived from public education, 
identified in the conference of 1949, were, in 1950, made into the 
form of an evaluative scale and extended to include administrative 
and instructional aspects of the program. It remains now further 
to refine this instrument until it becomes maximally useful in the 
study of elementary and secondary education in the State. 



To discharge the responsibility imposed upon the State De- 
partment by the enactment of Section 14A, Chapter 489, of the 1947 
Public School Laws of Maryland, which required nonpublic schools 
— including schools of higher learning but excluding those that were 
State-chartered or under church control — to be approved by the 
State Department of Education, it became necessary to appoint 
someone peculiarly qualified to set standards of evaluation as a basis 
for actual approval of institutions of higher learning and to work 
intelligently and effectively with the administrations of these institu- 
tions. The appointment of a Supervisor of Teacher and Higher 
Education was made in August 1949. 



Teacher and Higher Education 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

Table 66, on page 107, indicates the number of the various types 
of teachers', supervisors', and administrators' certificates issued by 
the State Superintendents in 1949-50. It is especially significant 
that it was necessary to issue more than twice as many War Emer- 
gency Degree Certificates for elementary school teaching in 1949-50 
than during the preceding year. 

On June 8, 1950, the State Board of Education upon recom- 
mendation of the State Superintendent, passed the following certi- 
ficate regulations in addition to those already approved: 

I. Certificate for Supervision of Special Education 

Required of all supervisors of special education; valid for three years; 
renewable for four years and then for six-year periods upon evidence of 
successful experience and professional spirit. 
Requirements : 

a. Completion of a four-year course in a standard college. 

b. One year of graduate work at a recognized university, chiefly in special 
education, including supervision and sufficient preparation in one of 
the areas of special education to qualify for a teacher's certificate in 
that area. 

b 1 Upon special request of a county superintendent the State Superintend- 
ent may issue such a certificate on a minimum of twelve semester hours 
of graduate work, chiefly in methods and supervision in the special 
field, with the provision that eighteen semester hours of additional 
graduate work, approved by the State Superintendent, shall be com- 
pleted within five years. 

c. Four years of successful teaching experience, including at least two 
years in one of the areas of special education. 

II. Certificate for Supervision of School Lunch 

Required of supervisors in school lunch; valid for three years; renewable 
for four years and then for six-year periods upon evidence of successful 
experience and professional spirit. 
Requirements: 

a. Completion of a standard four-year college course. 

b. A year of graduate work at a recognized university, chiefly in methods 
and supervision, including methods and supervision in school lunch. 

b 1 In the college or graduate work the applicant must have included ap- 
proximately forty-five semester hours of work in the special field. The 
forty-five semester hours of work in the field of school lunch must have 
included the following courses: foods, nutrition, food purchasing, food 
service equipment, food cost accounting, quantity cookery, supervision, 
curriculum development, child study, school lunch management, and 
supervision. 

c. Upon special request of a county superintendent, the State Superin- 
tendent may issue such a certificate on a minimum of twelve semester 
hours of graduate work, chiefly in methods and supervision, including 
methods and supervision in the special field, with the provision that 
eighteen semester hours of additional graduate work, approved by the 
State Superintendent, shall be completed within five years. 

d. Four school years (or the equivalent) of successful experience in food 
service management, including at least two years in a public school 
lunch program, or four years of successful experience as a teacher, in- 
cluding experience in management of the school lunch program. 



32 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

III. Certificate for Supervisors and Directors in Areas not Otherwise 

Covered in the Certification Requirements 

For a certificate as supervisor or director in an area not covered by other 

certificate regulations there shall be required a year of graduate work in 

Education and in the field of specialization. This certificate would cover 

the requirement for the following directors and supervisors now employed: 

Supervisor of Commercial and Adult Education 

Supervisor of Maintenance 

Supervisor of Buildings 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Director of Curriculum 

Director of Custodial Services 

Director of Building Operation, Maintenance, and Purchasing 

Director of Maintenance and Transportation 

Assistant Superintendent in Charge of Supporting Services 

Supervisor of Curriculum Development 

Supervisor of Audio- Visual Education 

Director of School Health 

Psychologist 

Psychiatrist 

Director of School Planning 

Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

Supervisor of Construction 

IV. Certificate for Speech and Hearing Therapist 

Required of all speech and hearing therapists; valid for three years; re- 
newable for four years and then for six-year periods upon evidence of 
successful experience and professional spirit and completion of a six-week 
summer term. 
Requirements: 

a. Completion of a four-year course in a standard college with a major in 
speech. 

b. One year of graduate work at a recognized university, with emphasis 
on speech and hearing therapy. The main field should include speech 
pathology, anatomy, and physiology of the ear and vocal mechanics, 
audiology, lip reading, methods and materials in teaching speech, di- 
rected teaching in speech and hearing. It is suggested that the minor 
field be psychology and include some work in mental tests, counseling, 
and psychotherapy. 

V. Certificates for Speech Teachers in Elementary and High Schools 
General requirement same as for Bachelor of Science Special and High 
School Special Certificates. 

Speech Content Requirement — 30 semester hours. 

Should include fundamentals of speech, voice and diction, public 
speaking, radio, pathology, phonetics, play production, teacher prob- 
lems in speech, and allied courses in psychology and hearing. 

VI. Certificate for Teacher of Driving 

For certification in this field the applicant must qualify for some type of 
teacher's certificate and must have had satisfactory training for safe driving. 

VII. Revision of Requirement for Junior High School Certificate 

If an applicant wishes to qualify for teaching an individual subject in the 
junior high school, he must meet the same content requirements as obtain 
for the High School Teacher's Certificate and must present credit for special 
methods and practice teaching in the subject. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Accreditation 



Academic Schools 



During the school year 1949-50, the members of the Accredita- 
tion Division visited every nonpublic academic school in the State 
at least once, except for one school which failed to submit the usual 
annual report. New schools were visited and certificates of ap- 
proval issued as follows: 



One nursery school and one kindergarten which had previously 
been approved were forced to close, in the one case because no 
building was available and in the other because the teacher took 
another position. The two schools returned their certificates of 
approval. 

The State Board of Education revoked three certificates of ap- 
proval issued to schools which ceased operations but failed to return 
their certificates. One of the institutions had moved to Virginia 
and the other two closed because teachers were not available. 

Visits were paid to eight additional schools which for various 
reasons did not receive certificates of approval. Five were unable 
to obtain the services of teachers with a minimum of professional 
training. One was a church school, which did not wish approval 
and which is exempt from the requirements of the State law with 
regard to approval by the State Superintendent. One of the in- 
stitutions which could not find qualified teachers decided to open as 
a nursery, but in compliance with a resolution of the State Board of 
Education refrained from using the word "school" in its name. Two 
other schools were on Federal Government property and were 
therefore not subject to the State law. 

A new elementary school which had submitted fairly satis- 
factory plans failed, when it opened, to conform even approximately 
to the plans which had been approved by the Department. The 
State Superintendent was therefore unable to approve the institution 
and directed it to close. 

Members of the Department, including two Supervisors of 
Elementary Schools, a Supervisor of High Schools, the Supervisor 
of Home Economics, the Supervisor of Colored Schools, the Super- 
visor of Curriculum Laboratory at Bowie, and the Director of 
Accreditation several times visited a settlement school for pre- 
delinquent girls from the District of Columbia, to determine whether 
the institution could be approved or could so modify its program 
as to justify approval. It was the consensus that no satisfactory 
program could be offered at the settlement school with the physical 
facilities and the staff which were available or which might become 



Type of School 



Number 



Nursery School and Kindergarten 

Nursery School 

Kindergarten 

Special 



3 
2 
2 
1 



34 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



available. At the request of the Director of Accreditation, two 
representatives of the Welfare Board in Washington met with 
members of the State Department of Education to discuss the situa- 
tion. It was agreed that most of the girls might to advantage attend 
a nearby junior high school, if the necessary arrangements could be 
made. The County Board of Education agreed to the proposal 
and the results have been satisfactory. 

Nonacademic Schools 

During the school year 1949-50 certificates of approval were 
issued to various types of nonpublic nonacademic schools, and other 
certificates were canceled, as indicated in the following table: 

Type of School Number of Certificates 

or Curricula Issued Canceled 

Art ". 4~~ 1 

Beauty — 3 

Business 1 — 

Correspondence 1 — 

Dance 1 1 

Flight 1 3 

Music 3 7 

Navigation — 1 

Photography — 2 

Speech 1 — 

Tailoring 1 — 

Watchmaking 2 — 

Miscellaneous 2 — 

One art school, two beauty schools, two flight schools, and four 
music schools, which closed during the year, have failed to return 
their certificates of approval or to consent to their revocation. When 
it has been possible to comply with certain legal requirements, these 
certificates will be revoked. 

At the direction of the State Superintendent the Accreditation 
Division made careful resurveys of all the nonpublic trade and 
technical schools in Maryland, with the exception of certain long- 
established schools, such as some of those which teach beauty cul- 
ture, business, art, and music. In each case an expert in the par- 
ticular field visited the school with one or more members of the 
Division. Specialists from other divisions of the State Depart- 
ment of Education, from local school board offices, from schools, 
colleges, and universities, from industry, and from the professions 
helped in the evaluations and offered suggestions for improvement. 

The groups visiting the schools included the following types 
of persons: 

A member of the local vocational division 

A member of the Custom Tailoring Education Commission of New York City 

Members of the Vocational Division of the State Department of Education 

A specialist in photography from Johns Hopkins University 

A director from the Philadelphia Museum of Art 

A director and a supervisor of art from local school systems 

The dean of an art school 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



A teacher of art from a State Teachers College 
Practicing commercial artists 

A director of the Food Trades Vocational High School, New York City 

Chairman of the Manhattan Trades Center, New York 

The proprietor of a camera repair shop in Washington 

Two members of the State Board of Examiners of Barbers 

An assistant professor of electrical engineering and an assistant 

professor of engineering at Johns Hopkins University 
The vice-president of the Horological Institute of America 

On the whole, the committees reported that the schools were 
doing adequate work, although, of course, in conversations at the 
schools and in reports filed with the State Superintendent suggestions 
for improvement were made. The State Superintendent gave each 
school a digest of the committee's report on the institution and the 
State supervisors have since worked with the schools to implement 
the various suggestions. 

In the summer of 1949 and through the winter of 1950, the 
Director and members of the Division held a number of conferences 
with the proprietor of a specialty shop who wished to start a school 
of retailing. The Division used the advisory services of a local 
supervisor of distributive education and two members of the Division 
visited two such schools in New York City. Later in the negotia- 
tions a committee, consisting of the Dean of the School of Retailing 
at New York University, a professor of retailing from Drexel In- 
stitute, and representatives from several local department stores, 
drew up standards for schools of retailing. The specialty shop 
proprietor failed to submit plans which approximately conformed to 
these standards and therefore did not open a school of retailing. 

In 1949-50 a small group applied for the approval of a prospec- 
tive correspondence course in art. A committee consisting of the 
head of the Commercial Art Department at the Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, a commercial art teacher from the Maryland In- 
stitute, and a Baltimore commercial artist went over the course of 
study with members of the Division and recommended that the 
course be changed considerably. The two people concerned with 
starting the course have so far not pursued the matter further. 

In September 1949, an additional assistant supervisor joined the 
Division to help supervise the nonpublic nonacademic schools. It 
was therefore possible to work more intensively with these schools 
than had previously been the case. 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

A deaconess training school applied for authority to issue a 
degree. A committee, consisting of a professor from Drew Uni- 
versity, one from Union Theological Seminary, and the dean of 
McCoy College of Johns Hopkins University, visited the training 
school with members of the Division and recommended steps which 
the committee thought would be necessary before the school should 
be permitted to award degrees. The institution has not yet met 
these conditions. 



36 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



During the school year 1949-50, the State Superintendent 
thought it desirable to have a small committee visit a specialized 
school of business, industry, and management which had been ap- 
proved some years ago. A committee, consisting of the Dean of the 
College of Commerce of New York University and the Dean of the 
School of Business and Public Administration of Temple University, 
together with members of the Division, made a survey and sug- 
gested a number of desirable changes in organization and administra- 
tion. A copy of the report was sent to the President of the institu- 
tion. The Director of the Division and the Supervisor of Teacher 
and Higher Education plan to confer with the President of the in- 
stitution from time to time relative to progress in the direction'of^the 
recommendations. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The establishment and improvement of library services for all 
the people of Maryland through public libraries, school libraries, 
and State institution libraries is the foremost concern of the Di- 
vision of Library Extension. To this end the staff works throughout 
the State in consultation with librarians of the public, school, and 
institution libraries; public library trustees; school and institution 
officials; and organizations and individuals who are interested in 
developing, improving, and interpreting library services and ma- 
terials. It aids in securing qualified professional personnel for all 
the libraries. 

As a special activity the Division promoted understanding of 
use of bookmobiles in rural areas by conducting a three-month ex- 
hibit of bookmobile service in nine Maryland counties. The 
demonstration visit of one week in each county was planned by the 
staff with local library boards, Parent-Teacher Associations, Fed- 
erated Women's clubs, Homemakers clubs, Boards of Education 
and other interested groups in each county. The bookmobiles with 
members of the Division staff made scheduled visits to communities, 
schools, and meetings of local organizations in each county. An 
estimated 2,000 adults and 25,000 children visited the bookmobiles. 
For many of them it was their first experience with bookmobile 
service. This project gained widespread interest and support for 
county- wide library service in these nine counties. Since the Garrett 
County weather does not permit bookmobile operation in the winter 
months, the library trustees of the Ruth Enlow Library rented their 
bookmobile to the State Department of Education for this project. 
Counties visited were: Allegany, Caroline, Charles, Dorchester, 
Frederick, Kent, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, and Somerset. 

The Division helped plan and participated in the programs of 
five county and regional book exhibits described in the section of this 
report headed "School Libraries," in a regional conference on book- 
mobile service at the Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library 
where there were representatives from Anne Arundel, Harford, and 
Prince George's counties, and in a two-day conference of county 
library administrators in Annapolis. 

As local libraries increase and the people realize the possibilities 
of library service, they request more materials on many more sub- 
jects than the libraries in the counties can collect. These materials 
are requested for loan through the Division of Library Extension 
which circulated 49,761 books, pamphlets, periodicals, and audio- 
visual aids this year. This is a 45 per cent increase over the circula- 
tion of the year ending June 30, 1949 and an increase of 122 per cent 
over 1948. Sixty-five per cent of these loans were made because of 
requests from the eleven county libraries. Thirty- two per cent of 
the items loaned were adult nonfiction of which one third was ar- 
ranged for by interlibrary loans from the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
and other libraries in Maryland and other states. 



38 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



Public Libraries 

The Library Extension Division has been active both in pro- 
moting the establishment of new county libraries and in aiding in 
improving the services of county libraries established prior to this 
year in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Garrett, Harford, Howard, 
Prince George's, Queen Anne's, Talbot, Washington, and Wicomico 
counties. 

Two significant achievements in the development of State-wide 
library service were the establishment of county library systems in 
Charles and St. Mary's counties in the spring of 1950. The forma- 
tion of the St. Mary's County Memorial Library was due largely 
to the interest and generosity of Mrs. Howard C. Davidson who 
purchased and is restoring Tudor Hall, the historic Key house, and 
is presenting it to the county for a library. The Charles County 
Library was established by the County Commissioners with an appro- 
priation of $7,000, about a three cent tax, for the first year of opera- 
tion. The formation of these two libraries brings to thirteen the 
number of counties which receive State aid for library service on a 
county-wide and tax-supported basis. Baltimore City also receives 
State aid for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

In May the Montgomery County Council passed a law estab- 
lishing a Montgomery County Department of Public Libraries 
which will operate without State aid. The Council took this action 
because of recommendations made by an eleven-member Library 
Advisory Committee which it had appointed early in November. 

Another noteworthy achievement during the year was the 
organization of the Cecil County Friends of the Library, the first 
county-wide Friends of the Library Group to be organized in the 
State. This group, made up of interested citizens in the county, has 
been active in securing additional support for the library and in in- 
creasing interest in library services. 

In the Spring of 1950 the Washington County Free Library be- 
gan bookmobile service to rural communities and schools. In 1907 
Washington County operated the first book wagon in the United 
States and is credited with being the pioneer in this now generally 
accepted method of service. The new bookmobile began a service 
not offered in Washington County since 1940. 

Pikesville has plans ready to build its war memorial library 
from funds collected from the citizens. This is a branch of the 
Baltimore County Library, which has also opened a much-enlarged 
branch in the center of Essex and another in the Arbutus-Halethorpe 
area. 

Harford County Library has conducted a successful series of 
monthly discussions on various subjects. As a result of this in- 
terest, the local Grange provided the labor and funds for converting 
the library basement into an attractive auditorium for meetings 
and film showings. Incidentally, the Grange won the State prize 
for this project. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



Queen Anne's County Free Library opened its first Negro 
branch at the Kennard School in Centreville, and the Wicomico 
County Free Library opened a Negro branch in Salisbury. 

The Talbot County Free Library expanded its facilities by 
building an additional workroom and storage room. 

Garrett County was without the services of a chief librarian 
during this year; in spite of this handicap, the library participated 
in the Oakland Centennial Celebration in the summer of 1949. The 
library board of trustees completed plans for the new Ruth Enlow 
Memorial Library building and construction was started in the 
spring of 1950. The Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries 
spent considerable time in conference with the acting librarian and 
the members of the board in planning the new building and in im- 
proving services. 

The Enoch Pratt Free Library is working on plans for building 
three new branch libraries to be financed by a bond issue which was 
passed by the Baltimore voters. 

The Bethesda Public Library Board of Trustees has chosen a 
site and is drawing plans for a library building which is being 
financed by the Library District. 

The Chestertown Public Library Board has remodeled its 
building and added a very attractive children's room. 

School Libraries 

The school library program for 1949-50 continued to emphasize 
two major needs; the improving of library personnel and extending 
and enriching the services of the library in the school. 

There was less emphasis on individual school visits by the Super- 
visor of School and Children's Libraries and more working with 
groups of librarians, teachers, and supervisors. 

The school librarians in many counties gained in self-confidence 
and, at the same time, worked more co-operatively, both as in- 
dividuals and as a group, with other teachers and the general 
supervisors. 

Four significant developments of State-wide importance are: 

1. Programs of in-service training for school librarians were expanded. 

The first of a series of annual work conferences for selected school librarians 
from over the State was conducted by Mrs. Mary Peacock Douglas, rec- 
ognized authority on school library service. Thirty school librarians at- 
tended the two-day conference which dealt with all aspects of the library 
as a service agency in the school. The program of the conference was 
built around suggestions made or questions asked by the participants. 

One tangible outgrowth of the conference was the initiation of meetings 
of the librarians in each of several counties for the purpose of discussing 
their mutual problems and sharing ideas. 



40 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

The conference was sponsored co-operatively by the Division of Instruc- 
tion and the Division of Library Extension. 

2. Increasing participation of school librarians in general workshops and a 
growing recognition of the contribution the library can make to the school 
program. 

There were no library workshops, but librarians participated in most of 
the county workshops. This served the two-fold purpose of better ac- 
quainting the librarian with the curriculum and of enabling her to assist 
in the selection and use of materials. 

3. Stimulation in selection and use of all types of materials through ex- 
hibits and programs planned co-operatively by county libraries and county 
Boards of Education. 

Eleven county libraries and Boards of Education planned county or 
regional book exhibits for teachers, librarians, parents, and children. The 
purposes of these exhibits were to give teachers and librarians an oppor- 
tunity to examine materials before selecting them for purchasing or borrow- 
ing, to discuss uses of the materials and common problems of teachers and 
librarians. The counties included were: Allegany, Caroline, Cecil, 
Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne's, Somerset, Talbot, Washington, Wicomico, 
and Worcester. 

4. Preparation of a new annual report form which will serve as a tool for 
principals and librarians to use in evaluating library service. 

The report form was prepared by the Supervisor of School and Children's 
Libraries with the assistance of a group of school librarians and members of 
the staff of the Division of Instruction. 



State Institution Libraries 

Libraries in both hospitals and correctional institutions can play 
a vital part in rehabilitation, re-education, and recreation. The 
Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for stimulating 
library development in the State institutions by giving guidance in 
the organization and improvement of library facilities and services 
in each institution. 

The tuberculosis hospitals under the State Department of 
Health continue to lead the way in library development with a two- 
year-old, active, library program under the direction of a professional 
librarian at the Victor Cullen Hospital and with a qualified librarian 
appointed at the Henry ton Hospital in the fall of 1949. Under the 
direction of the librarian of the Victor Cullen Hospital, the library 
at Mt. Wilson Hospital is expanding its service with a patient in 
charge. Plans have been made for new library quarters and a 
qualified staff at both Mt. Wilson and the tuberculosis building of 
the Baltimore City Hospital when new buildings are completed. 
The continued interest of the Maryland Tuberculosis Association 
in urging library quarters in the new buildings and their financial 
assistance in the purchase of books for all established libraries is a 
great boon to successful library development. 

As a result of frequent conferences with members of the State 
Departments and institutional staffs and of surveys of existing 
library conditions, specific recommendations for improved library 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



services were made to the Department of Correction, the Division 
of Juvenile Training Schools of the Department of Public Welfare, 
and the Department of Mental Hygiene. Facilities for library 
service are inadequate in these institutions and because of lack of 
both books and staff this area of service is almost totally undeveloped. 
As a result of recommendations made by the Supervisor of County 
and Institution Libraries, progress was made in library development 
at the Maryland House of Correction which set up an annual budget 
for the purchase of books, reorganized its present library, and sur- 
veyed inmate reading interest as an aid to selection of material. A 
survey made three months after the initial group of new books had 
been put into circulation showed such a marked increase in use of 
books, particularly the new books, that a similar project was under- 
taken at the Maryland State Reformatory for Males, where seven 
hundred and fifty dollars was spent in 1950 for new books. 

The library at Boys' Village opened in December 1949 under 
the direction of a member of the education staff with three student 
assistants. Meetings were held with the superintendent and de- 
partment heads of Boys' Village to discuss ways to make the library 
effective in each part of the school program. 

All of the State juvenile training schools borrowed extensively 
from the book collection of the Division of Library Extension and 
special guidance was given in selection of suitable materials and in 
suggestions for their use. 

Visits were made to the mental hospitals at Springfield, Spring 
Grove, and Crownsville. Conferences were held with staff mem- 
bers interested in a library, but it seems likely that no definite 
library development will be undertaken until after the new com- 
missioner of Mental Hygiene has taken office. There is a need in all 
State institutions for a substantial increase in up-to-date library 
materials selected to meet the particular needs of the institution and 
for capable personnel to carry out an adequate library program. 

State-wide Interest 

Increased interest in library service is State-wide. Some of the 
organizations which are promoting improved libraries as a part of 
their State programs are: American Association of University 
Women, American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, Business 
and Professional Women's Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, 
Kiwanis Club, League of Women Voters, Lions Club, Maryland 
Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers, Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers, Maryland Council of Homemakers Clubs, 
Maryland Educational Association, Maryland Farm Bureau, Mary- 
land Farm Bureau Associated Women, Maryland Federation of 
Women's Clubs, Maryland Library Association, Maryland State 
Grange, Maryland State Teachers Association, Maryland Tuber- 
culosis Association, Optimist Club, Rotary Club, Senior 4-H Club 
Council, Soroptimist Club, local civic and improvement associations, 
and many other groups. 



42 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

One of the most important developments in the field of voca- 
tional education during the past year was the institution of a new 
supervisory technique which was employed to survey county school 
systems. This new survey method utilized a complete "team" of 
vocational supervisors from the State office. Following the school 
visitations, a detailed report was written by the supervisors in each 
area and a complete report was sent to the county by the State 
Director of Vocational Education. 

Vocational education offers the student courses in such diversi- 
fied fields as agriculture, the mechanic arts, and home economics. 
Vocational education services not only provide the student with a 
basic introduction to his chosen vocation, but also serve as a practical 
and functional type of vocational guidance, since the student may 
gain experience and knowledge in a wide range of vocational fields. 



Agricultural Education 

In the past year, vocational agriculture courses have been 
receiving increasing emphasis in the schools and colleges of Mary- 
land. Many counties, during the transition to a twelve-grade 
school system, took that opportunity to expand their existing 
agricultural education facilities. The result has been that agri- 
culture has shared quite well in the public school building program 
in Maryland. And in the summer sessions of 1949 and 1950, the 
University of Maryland off ered courses in farm management especial- 
ly designed to meet the needs of vocational agriculture teacher- 
training. 

The work of the Future Farmers of America and the New 
Farmers of America improved steadily throughout the past year. 
Seven officer-leadership training schools were held across the State 
which were accessible to all F. F. A. and N. F. A. officers. At the 
1950 F. F. A. Convention in Kansas City 37 Maryland boys were 
in attendance; in 1946 there were but two. 

One problem that received a considerable amount of attention 
during the past year is the matter of school farms and land laborator- 
ies. While not recognized as a necessity in all situations, it is felt 
that many vocational agriculture programs can be materially im- 
proved by use of school farms and land laboratories. 

Two state-wide agriculture conferences were held. The an- 
nual summer conference of vocational agriculture teachers met in 
Garrett County. In addition, seven area and nine county con- 
ferences were held during the year. 

The usual summer conference for colored vocational agriculture 
teachers met at Bowie in August. Two one-day conferences also 
were held for the entire group during the year. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



Trade and Industrial Education 

The trade and industrial education program for the year 1949-50 
shows considerable improvement in plant facilities and the quality 
of instruction. The offerings in the evening trade extension classes 
have increased, as well as the offerings in the veterans training pro- 
grams. There was also noticeable increase in the training for 
apprentices and this increase was not confined to veterans' training. 

The improvement of teacher-training services received major 
emphasis during the past year. Programs for in-service training 
for teachers as well as pre-service and graduate courses were con- 
ducted by the University of Maryland. The current trend is toward 
expanded services in the in-service and graduate level categories in 
industrial education. The year 1949-50 has seen increased need 
and opportunities that should eventually result in university level 
educational and training services to industry as well as to public 
schools. 

In addition, the vocational education department, through a 
series of conferences with staff members, local supervisors, prin- 
cipals, and teachers has considered such topics as administrative 
practices, articulation between sending and receiving schools, the 
development of new courses of study, and the self -appraisal of 
programs on pre-vocational and vocational levels. The State 
Director and his staff have worked with local administrators, super- 
visors, principals, and lay groups in implementing plans in accordance 
with State policy and community needs. 

Through co-operative relations with employers, public school 
departments, and co-operating agencies, the vocational industrial 
education department has increased the over-all effectiveness of its 
program and obtained support on many matters giving material 
assistance to vocational education. Under the school building pro- 
grams, industrial education has been able to bring its educational 
facilities to a high level of modernization. Through direct pur- 
chases and the acquisition of equipment through donable prop- 
erties procedures, the department has been able to obtain types of 
equipment that were impossible to acquire in previous years. 

Home Economics Education 

Considerable time during this past year was given to the de- 
velopment of curriculum materials and organization. Through the 
medium of teachers' committees, which were formed in many coun- 
ties, much interest has been created and some progress made in 
adapting approved teaching methods and materials to actual class- 
room situations. 

There has been a large program of school building, including 
new departments for home economics, in most of the counties of the 
State. State and county supervisors have devoted considerable 
time and thought to helping plan the layout and equipment of new 
buildings and in redesigning some old ones. 



44 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



The State Supervisor of Home Economics acted as State ad- 
viser for the New Homemakers of America (for colored girls) and 
an active program was carried out throughout the year. Every 
home economics department now has a chapter of N. H. A. A re- 
organization of the State Advisory Committee is in progress, and 
it is designed to increase the number of advisers from six to twelve; 
it will thus spread the interest and information of N. H. A. among 
the advisers. A delegation of six State officers was sent to the Na- 
tional Convention in Louisiana in June. 

There has been an increased enrollment in teacher training in 
both the white and colored institutions in the State, resulting in a 
greater number of qualified teachers becoming available in the spring 
of 1950. This increase in the supply of teachers was probably due 
to a recruitment program and to the increased salary schedule. 

Distributive Education 

The past year witnessed a continuation of growth and progress 
in the establishment and improvement of distributive education 
courses in the schools of the State. The program advanced in terms 
of both scope and effectiveness. On the adult training level, em- 
ployers generally appeared to be more amenable to training, and 
firms which had sponsored training programs in the past expanded 
their activities and placed more employees in one of the distributive 
education programs. 

Distributive education courses are now offered by one or more 
high schools in Baltimore City, and Allegany, Montgomery, and 
Washington Counties. A few schools have classes in retail selling 
and office training as a part of the commercial program. 

A marked increase in both attendance and interest was evidenced 
in the distributive education courses offered in Baltimore City during 
1949-50. Total enrollments in the courses jumped from 2,320 stu- 
dents in 1948-49 to 3,455 students. Fifty -three more distributive 
education classes were offered, and fifteen more co-operating employ- 
ers consented to aid in the training program. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

During the year 1949-50 the Division of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion continued to broaden the scope of services rendered to disabled 
citizens of the State and to prepare for and place in satisfactory em- 
ployment a larger number of these persons than in any previous year, 
the total being in excess of 800. 

The most significant advance was in the direction of providing 
more adequate services for some of the severely disabled, principally 
through the facilities of the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center, 
at Fishersville, Virginia. In 1947 the State of Virginia obtained 
from the Federal Government the ownership of the Woodrow Wilson 
Army General Hospital. This hospital, located at Fishersville, 
midway between Staunton and Waynesboro, Virginia, was con- 
structed during World War II. A part of this huge plant was taken 
over by the Virginia Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and 
transformed into one of the most modern and complete rehabilita- 
tion centers in the United States, with facilities to care for 400 per- 
sons. At the Center it is possible to provide complete rehabilitation 
services, with the exception of hospitalization and surgery, for 
clients who are so severely disabled as to render inf easible the ordinary 
methods of rehabilitation. A complete medical section under the 
direction of a qualified doctor of physical medicine provides restora- 
tion services through physical therapy, occupational therapy, the 
fitting of prosthetic appliances and training in their use, diet regula- 
tion, and other means. A competent guidance staff is maintained to 
assist clients in choosing vocations in keeping with their physical 
and mental capacities. Training courses have been established in 
more than fifteen trades; such as, watch repair, sewing, beauty cul- 
ture, printing, weaving, and shoe repair. Additional training 
courses are available in the Western Virginia Regional Technical 
School, which occupies another section of the post. 

While the Center is open to all disabled persons who can benefit 
from physical restoration or training, it is particularly adapted to 
the needs of the severely disabled; paraplegics, double amputees, 
spastics, and those suffering from such a debilitating condition as 
multiple sclerosis. The construction of the plant, with all buildings 
at one level and connected by covered corridors, is ideal for wheel- 
chair cases, of which there is always a great number in attendance. 

Dormitories are provided for those who are able to live in them. 
For those who require more privacy, single or double rooms are 
available. The living quarters are well supervised by a house father, 
house mother, and their staffs. Ample recreation facilities are pro- 
vided, and the students participate actively in the direction of their 
own programs. 

Since it would not be practicable for each state having a rela- 
tively small population to maintain such a center for its own re- 
habilitation clients, the Woodrow Wilson Center has been opened to 
clients from neighboring states since early in 1948. During the past 



46 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



year Maryland took advantage of this opportunity and maintained 
between twelve and fifteen students in the process of physical restora- 
tion or training, or both, at the Center at all times. While the 
majority of these programs are still in progress, five Maryland re- 
habilitation clients have completed their training at the Center 
and have returned home, where they have been placed in remunera- 
tive employment. 

The Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center fills a need that 
has been evident for many years, and it is expected that the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation will make increasing use of these facili- 
ties. The next concern is with those clients who are too severely dis- 
abled even to attend a rehabilitation center. Provision must be 
made for preparing them to lead useful lives even though they are 
confined to their homes or otherwise incapable of participating in 
any of the existing programs. 

During 1949-50 also, improvements were made upon the al- 
ready excellent plan of co-operation between the Division and the 
Maryland State Employment Service. An employment counselor 
from the M. S. E. S. staff was assigned regularly to the Division to 
assist counselors in placing disabled persons in industry. This plan 
has been extremely successful since it places at the command of 
each rehabilitation counselor the complete resources of the Employ- 
ment Service with its supply of information on job openings and 
employment conditions. 

The past year also witnessed a step forward in another direction. 
The professional standing of Vocational Rehabilitation within the 
State has been greatly enhanced by the organization of the Mary- 
land Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association. The 
N. R. A. was organized more than twenty years ago to further the 
cause of Vocational Rehabilitation throughout the country. It has 
been active in developing rehabilitation methods and techniques, in 
providing a forum for the expression of opinion by all who are in- 
terested in the welfare of the handicapped, and in assisting in the 
preparation of legislation in behalf of disabled persons. With 
the organization of the Maryland Chapter it is felt that there will 
be a corresponding unification and concentration within the State 
of the efforts of all those who are interested in the problems of the 
disabled. A gratifying number of co-operating agencies and in- 
dividuals throughout the State have shown an interest in the new 
organization and are participating actively in its direction. 

Action on Case Load 

Of the 5,512 disabled persons on the live roll, 3,330 were on the 
roll at the beginning of the year and the other 2,182 were new cases. 
During the year 3,562 persons actually received service. 

The "new" cases were reported by 34 different agencies from 
all 23 counties and Baltimore City. Hospital clinics led the list 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



with 263, while public welfare agencies came next, with 241, fol- 
lowed by tuberculosis sanatoria and associations, with 182. 

Purchase of Services 

Rehabilitation funds were used to purchase 3,119 services. At 
least 2,069 additional services were rendered with funds contributed 
by other agencies or by the disabled clients themselves. 

Of the total of 818 persons rehabilitated, 357 lived in Baltimore 
City and 461 in the counties. Among the group were 52 blind per- 
sons and 90 persons who had previously had tuberculosis. The 818 
rehabilitated persons are now earning at the rate of $1,336,071.72 a 
year, and are supporting not only themselves but, in addition, 1,004 
dependents. 

Expenditures 

Expenditures for the year, amounting to $372,453.74, consisted 
of appropriations of $225,140.59 from Federal funds and $147,313.15 
from State funds. The increase in State funds expended over the 
previous year amounted to over 40.7 per cent. 

These funds were expended as follows: 



Administration 

Guidance and Supervision 
Case Services 



$20,847.32 
148,627.37 
202,979.05 



48 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Opening and Closing Dates of Maryland Public Schools, 
Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1949 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools in 
June, 
1950 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1949 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools in 
June, 
1950 



Baltimore City 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



12 



TABLE 2— Number of Maryland County Public Schools in Session Fewer Than 180 
Days, Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year or County 


Total 
Number 


Number Having 
One-Teacher 


Number Larger 
Elementary 
Schools 


Combined 
Elementary 
and High 


WHITE SCHOOLS 


1949 


5 


1 


4 




1950 


1 




i 


Caroline 


1 






*i 












COLORED SCHOOLS 


1949 


1 




1 




1950 


1 




1 




Charles 


1 




tl 













4 a ^ 3 1 due to heater boiler replacement. 
fl77 days J 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



TABLE 3 — Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Schools, Public and Nonpublic, by 
Color: State of Maryland, Baltimore City, and Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Type of School 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 



ENROLLMENT 



Public and Nonpublic 






















413,053 


335,635 


77,418 


287,201 


230,098 


57,103 


125,852 


105,537 


20,315 


City 


161,075 


118,071 


43,004 


116,996 


84,335 


32,661 


44,079 


33,736 


10,343 


Countiest 


251,978 


217,564 


34,414 


170,205 


145,763 


24,442 


81,773 


71,801 


9,972 


Public* 




















State 


343,245 


268,509 


74,736 


229,637 


174,941 


54,696 


113,608 


93,568 


20,040 


City 


121,365 


80,140 


41,225 


84,401 


53,280 


31,121 


36,964 


26,860 


10,104 




221,880 


188,369 


33,511 


145,236 


121,661 


23,575 


76,644 


66,708 


9,936 


Nonpublic 




















State 


69,808 


67,126 


2,682 


57,564 


55,157 


2,407 


12,244 


11,969 


275 


City 


39,710 


37,931 


1,779 


32,595 


31,055 


1,540 


7,115 


6,876 


239 


Counties 


30,098 


29,195 


903 


24,969 


24,102 


867 


5,129 


5,093 


36 



TEACHING STAFF 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


14,251 


11,767 


2,484 














City 


5,485 


4,096 


1,389 














Countiest 


8,766 


7,671 


1,095 














Public 




















State 


11,521 


9,129 


2,392 


6,536 


4,970 


1,566 


4,985 


4,160 


825 


City 


4,091 


2,774 


1,317 


2,449 


1,538 


911 


1,642 


1,237 


405 


Countiest 


7,430 


6,355 


1,075 


4,087 


3,432 


655 


3,343 


2,923 


420 


Nonpublic 




















State 


2,730 


2.638 


92 
















1,394 


1,322 


72 














Counties 


1,336 


1,316 


20 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















State 


*1,295 


*970 


*325 


1,162 


859 


303 


294 


246 


48 


City 


*268 


*201 


*67 


231 


172 


59 


57 


46 


11 




*1,027 


*769 


*258 


931 


• 687 


244 


237 


200 


37 


Public 




















State 


*971 


*665 


*306 


858 


574 


284 


225 


181 


44 


City 


*153 


*98 


*55 


122 


75 


47 


35 


27 


8 


Countiest 


*818 


*567 


*251 


736 


499 


237 


190 


154 


36 


Nonpublic 




















State 


*324 


*305 


*19 


304 


285 


19 


69 


65 


4 


City 


*115 


*103 


*12 


109 


97 


12 


22 


19 


3 




*209 


*202 


*7 


195 


188 


7 


47 


46 


1 



For basic data see TABLES I, II, III, IV, V, and X. 
* Excludes duplicates. 

t Excludes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHART 1 

Enrollment in Public Schools by Color: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1950 



200 



125 



100 



75 



50 



















/ 

* 

/ 

-i 










/ 


/ 








es - White 










y 


















































Counties 


; - Colored 












^ 

rallied 


•e City - Col 


ored 










MM 


mm 


1 I'M 1 


MM 


MM 


I'M M 1 



1925 1928 1955 1958 1945 19A8 1955 

Year 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



TABLE 4 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: Counties of 
Maryland and Baltimore City : 1941-1950 





Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1941 


166,058 


122,185 


149,969 


87,291 


12,578 


31,753 


3,511 


3,141 


1942 


169,579 


119,651 


152,449 


85,039 


13,319 


31,122 


3,811 


3,490 


1U3 


172,317 


118,800 


154,701 


84,389 


13,770 


30,809 


3,846 


3,602 


1944 


171,917 


117,414 


153,158 


82,709 


14,721 


31,097 


4,038 


3,608 


1945 


174,113 


115,289 


154,502 


79,552 


15,192 


31,783 


4,419 


3,954 


1946 


17', ,016 


113,021 


155,873 


77,086 


16,221 


31,571 


4,922 


4,364 


1947 


181,278 


112,648 


157,992 


76,471 


17,069 


31,608 


6,217 


4,569 


1948 


189,224 


114,688 


163,549 


77,702 


18,584 


31,935 


7,091 


5,051 


1949 


201,124 


116,220 


173,701 


78,762 


20,189 


32,457 


7,234 


5,001 


1950. . . . 


218,125 


118,071 


188,930 


80,140 


21,971 


32,922 


7,224 


5,009 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1941. . . . 


29,282 


34,703 


28,720 


33,169 


562 


1,447 




87 


1942. . . . 


28,965 


34,487 


28,356 


33,047 


609 


1,377 




63 


1943. . . . 


28,769 


34,318 


28,137 


32,840 


632 


1,407 




71 


1944. . . . 


28,555 


34,804 


27,928 


33,189 


627 


1,539 




76 


1945 .... 


29,061 


35,747 


28,431 


34,269 


630 


1,403 




75 


1946 


29,824 


37,034 


29,166 


35,465 


658 


1,476 




93 


1947. . . . 


30,882 


38,295 


30,032 


36,678 


750 


1,518 


100 


99 


1948.. . 


31,717 


39,762 


30,875 


38,023 


783 


1,558 


59 


181 


1949 


33,039 


40,484 


32,226 


38,714 


792 


1,624 


21 


146 


1950. . . . 


34,531 


43,004 


33,628 


41,225 


879 


1,637 


24 


142 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 



52 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 5 — Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color — Type of School : 
Counties of Maryland and Baltimore City: 1941-1950 





Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Nonpublic Schools 


Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1941 


121,933 


95,401 


110,021 


65,732 


10,082 


27,371 


1,830 


2,298 


1942 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65,123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94,780 


115,253 


65,904 


11,059 


26,104 


2,124 


2,772 


1944 


129,828 


94,497 


115,586 


65,708 


11,797 


26,010 


2,445 


2,779 


1945 


131,549 


92,309 


116,611 


62,969 


12,162 


26,322 


2,776 


3,018 


1946. . . . 


118,579 


79,779 


102,148 


50,482 


13,187 


25,883 


3,244 


3,414 


1947 


119,771 


79,458 


101,784 


49,707 


13,888 


26,214 


4,099 


3,537 


1948 


126,280 


80,947 


105,790 


51,073 


15,290 


26,000 


5,200 


3,874 


1949 


135,045 


82,871 


112,996 


52,406 


16,803 


26,661 


5,246 


3,804 


1950 


146,324 


84,335 


122,222 


53,280 


18,590 


27,236 


5,512 


3,819 



WHITE HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1941 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


39,448 


18,485 


2,711 


4,705 


1,722 


830 


1944 


42,089 


22,917 


37,572 


17,001 


2,924 


5,087 


1,593 


829 


1945 


42,564 


22,980 


37,891 


16,583 


3,030 


5,461 


1,643 


936 


1946 


58,437 


33,242 


53,725 


26,604 


3,034 


5,688 


1,678 


950 


1947 


61,507 


33,190 


56,208 


26,764 


3,181 


5,394 


2,118 


1,032 


1948 


62,944 


33,741 


57,759 


26,629 


3,294 


5,935 


1,891 


1,177 


1949 


66,079 


33,349 


60,705 


26,356 


3,386 


5,796 


1,988 


1,197 


1950 


71,801 


33,736 


66,708 


26,860 


3,381 


5,686 


1,712 


1,190 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1941 


24,114 


30,515 


23,552 


29,112 


562 


1,335 




68 


1942 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


29,247 


609 


1,249 




50 


1943 


23,505 


30,553 


22,873 


29,245 


632 


1,253 




55 


1944 


23,337 


31,254 


22,736 


29,857 


601 


1,334 




63 


1945 


23,825 


31,753 


23,195 


30,503 


630 


1,179 




71 


1946 


22,824 


29,044 


22,166 


27,686 


658 


1,270 




88 


1947 


23,144 


29,448 


22,294 


28,018 


750 


1,334 


100 


96 


1948 


23,459 


30,539 


22,646 


28,996 


754 


1,375 


59 


168 


1949 


24,089 


31,033 


23,305 


29,466 


763 


1,421 


21 


146 


1950 


24,559 


32,661 


23,692 


31,121 


843 


1,402 


24 


138 



COLORED HIGH AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



1941 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 




112 




19 


1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 




128 




13 


1943 


5,264 


3,765 


5,264 


3,595 




154 




16 


1944 


5,218 


3,550 


5,192 


3,332 


'26 


205 




13 


1945 


5,236 


3,994 


5,236 


3,766 




224 




4 


1946 


7,000 


7,990 


7,000 


7,779 




206 




5 


1947 


7,738 


8,847 


7,738 


8,660 




184 




3 


1948 


8,258 


9,223 


8,229 


9,027 


29 


183 




13 


1949 


8,950 


9,451 


8,921 


9,248 


29 


203 






1950 


9,972 


10,343 


9,936 


10,104 1 


36 


235 




"a 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 

For public and nonpublic enrollment in detail, see TABLES II, III, IV, and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



TABLE 6 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed 

with State Funds: 1949-50 





Total 


Home Teaching 


Transportation 
to Regular 
Classes 


Instruction in Special 
Schools 


TMTV 

UOUN I i 
















Pupils 




rTjpils 


.fcjxpenai- 
tures 


.. 

rupils 


1 eacn- 
ers 


T7> J- 

rjxpendi- 
tures 


Pi 'l 
rupi s 


£jxpenci]- 
tures 


Baltimore 
City Hos- 
pital 
Schools 


Other 
Schools 


.fcjxpend.1- 
tures 


Total State 


626 


*$35,000.00 


363 


134 


$14,058.80 


36 


$2,176.84 


202 


25 


$14,165.65 

tio.ooo.oo 

4,165.65 


Baltimore City . . 
Total Counties . . 


231 


10,000.00 
*25,000.00 


164 


10 


9 


58 


395 


199 


124 


14,058.80 


27 


2,176.84 


144 


25 


Allegany 


36 


1,967.23 
2,833.93 
5,337.07 
60.00 


9 


6 


875.42 


9 


1,091.81 
302.11 
185.28 


18 






Anne Arundel 
Baltimore .... 
Calvert 


56 
88 
2 


29 
32 
1 


9 
17 
1 


1,281.78 
2,336.18 
60.00 


5 
5 


14 

35 
1 


g 
16 


1,250.04 
2,815.61 




1 


102.84 


1 


1 


102^84 












Carroll 


12 


930.25 


9 


7 


830.25 






2 


1 


100.00 


Cecil 


8 


492.18 


5 


4 


492.18 






3 




Charles 


7 


87.00 


1 


1 


87.00 






6 






Dorchester. . . . 


7 


366.70 


3 


3 


366.70 






4 






Frederick 


23 


737.72 


12 


6 


537.72 


i 


200.00 


10 






Garrett 


7 


291.15 


4 


4 


291.15 




3 






Harford 


10 


153.78 


3 


3 


153.78 






7 








15 


242.40 


3 


3 


242.40 






12 






Kent 


2 


34.50 


1 


1 


34.50 






1 






Montgomery . . 


37 


2,579.31 


31 


17 


2,428.42 


3 


150.89 


3 






Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 


36 
2 


1,974.77 
134.88 


27 
1 


16 
1 


1,841.77 
134.88 


2 


133.00 


7 
1 






7 
3 


11.56 
319.93 


3 
2 


2 
2 


J11.56 
206.18 


i 
l 


t 

113.75 


3 






Talbot 


2 


92.50 


1 


1 

6 


92.50 




i 






Washington . . . 
Wicomico 


15 
9 


695.45 


6 


695.45 






9 






562.70 


6 


5 


562.70 






3 






Worcester .... 


10 


393.44 


9 


8 


393.44 






1 



















* Includes a nonallocable amount of $4,598.71 expended for State- wide clinical services and audiometric examina- 
tions, mf^t 

t Amount paid by State toward the salaries for the instruction of 202 children in Baltimore City hospital schools, 
of whom 58 were from Baltimore City and 144 from the counties. 

X Excludes overpayment made previous year. 



54 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 7 

Baltimore City Special Classes and Highwood School for Semester 
Ending June 30, 1950 



Kind of Class 



Number of 
Classes 



Net Roll 



Average 
Net Roll 



Per Cent of 
Attendance 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 





22 


377 


380 


89.2 


Orthopedic 


10 


214 


214 


88.0 


Sight Conservation 


3 


43 


43 


88.4 




4 


35 


36 


91.0 


Deaf 


3 


29 


30 


89.0 


Mixed* 


2 


56 


57 


90.0 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 



Total and Average. 



Orthopedic 

Sight Conservation . . . 
Hsaring Conservation 
Deaf 




85.5 

88.0 
88.0 
84.0 
82.0 



SOCIALLY 


HANDICAPPl 


3D WHITE PU 


PILS 






5 


68 


68 


77.8 


MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PI 


JPILS 





Total and Average . 



Opportunity. . 
Special Center. 
Shop Center. . 




80.1 

84.5 
80.0 
76.8 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


103 


1,941 


1,808 


82.7 




63 


1,151 


986 


83.1 












Shop Center 


40 


790 


822 


82.4 



* Two junior high s»hool classes, consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: 
sight, 7; cardiac, 11; deaf, 3; and hearing, 3. 



orthopedic, 32; 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



TABLE 8 



Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled* in Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children, Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Name and Location 


Enrollment 


Total Number of 
Different Teachers 


Nursery 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- 
mentary 


Secondary 


Full- 
time 


Part- 
time 




WHITE 










Children's Rehabilitation Inst., 




















76 




9 




Child Study Center, Baltimore . . 






31 




6 




Garden School, Baltimore 






11 




3 




Jr. League Nursery School for 














Deaf, Baltimore 


10 








2 




Maryland School for Blind, 


















8 


60 


21 


17 




Maryland School for Deaf, 


















22 


110 


21 


18 




Maryland Training School for 




















555 


108 


6 




Matthews School, Rodgers Forge 


*5 


"4 


7 




2 




Montrose School for Girls, 




















81 


60 


12 




Nursery School for Cerebral 
















32 








4 




Reinhardt School for Deaf, 














Kensington 


11 


8 


13 




2 




Rosewood State Training School, 


















45 


249 




15 




St. Mary's Industrial School, 














Baltimore 






81 




7 


4 


School of the Chimes, Baltimore . 




"5 


7 




2 


3 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 


"i 


2 


14 




3 




COLORED 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen 

Burnie 

Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., 

Maryland School for Blind, 

Overlea 

Dept. for Colored Deaf 




5 
12 


97 
124 

17 

36 


4 


9 

7 

5 
6 


1 

2 
3 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



56 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 9— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1941-1950 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


Total State 


37,126 


44,154 


47,353 


43.763 


42,816 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


Baltimore City .... 


15,995 


19,720 


21,054 


18,830 


17,848 


21,111 


23,992 


22,083 


21,496 


21,382 


Total Counties .... 


21,131 


24,434 


26,299 


24,933 


24,968 


29,622 


32,835 


32,009 


32,552 


34,610 


Allegany 


1,853 


1,912 


1,920 


1,689 


1,724 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1,520 


1,831 


1,932 


1,857 


1,819 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


Baltimore 


3,509 


4,749 


5,489 


5,112 


5,174 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


Calvert 


248 


258 


317 


280 


312 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 


Caroline 


365 


348 


381 


349 


329 


387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


Carroll 


650 


750 


758 


667 


708 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


Cecil 


582 


570 


757 


682 


702 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


Charles 


548 


616 


661 


628 


605 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 


Dorchester 


470 


514 


491 


482 


462 


526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


Frederick 


1,109 


1,124 


1,183 


1,087 


1,141 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 




531 


490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 


Harford 


748 


1,140 


1,168 


1,171 


1,090 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 




406 


414 


470 


420 


381 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


Kent 


243 


251 


259 


300 


246 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


Montgomery . . . 


2,218 


2,666 


2,773 


2,674 


2,694 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


Prince George's . 


2,325 


2,758 


3,131 


2,984 


2,992 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


Queen Anne's. . . 


254 


256 


248 


239 


260 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


St. Mary's 


376 


454 


540 


569 


708 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 


Somerset 


402 


362 


393 


374 


357 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


Talbot 


332 


344 


323 


330 


330 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


Washington .... 


1,409 


1,562 


1,562 


1,504 


1,467 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


Wicomico 


635 


657 


653 


671 


636 


741 


875 


892 


866 


894 


Worcester 


398 


408 


386 


400 


407 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



TABLE 10 — White and Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1941-1950 

Data from Bureau Vital Statistics, Maryland Stale Department of Health 



Resident Births In Maryland 



County 
























1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


.1950 



WHITE 





29 521 


- 

35,911 


38,749 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


DdHiniorc ^yity .... 


11 886 


15 076 


16,077 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


1 OL<il VyOUIltlcS .... 


17 635 


20 835 


22,672 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 


Allegany 


1,821 


1,871 


1,887 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1,080 


1,360 


1,487 


1,442 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


Baltimore 


3,275 


4,501 


5,155 


4,862 


4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


Calvert 


112 


115 


147 


116 


156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 




274 


250 


283 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


Carroll 


610 


686 


716 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


Cecil 


528 


521 


698 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


Charles 


270 


343 


382 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


Dorchester 


299 


327 


318 


318 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


Frederick 


972 


1,009 


1,067 


979 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


Garrett 


531 


490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


Harford 


662 


1,042 


1,081 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 




325 


346 


383 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


Kent 


156 


155 


156 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


Montgomery . . . 


1,981 


2,443 


2,543 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


Prince George's . 


1,851 


2,276 


2,672 


2,532 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


Queen Anne's . . . 


166 


164 


177 


170 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 


St. Mary's 


225 


282 


336 


388 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


Somerset 


219 


218 


217 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


Talbot 


207 


196 


216 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


Washington .... 


1,378 


1,523 


1,530 


1,479 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 




452 


482 


492 


501 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


Worcester 


241 


235 


225 


246 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 



COLORED 



Total State 


7,605 


8,243 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


Baltimore City .... 


4,109 


4,644 


4,977 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


Total Counties .... 


3,496 


3,599 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 


Allegany 


32 


41 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


Anne Arundel . . . 


440 


471 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


Baltimore 


234 


248 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


Calvert 


136 


143 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


Caroline 


91 


98 


98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


Carroll 


40 


64 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


Cecil 


54 


49 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


Charles 


278 


273 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


Dorchester 


171 


187 


173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


Frederick 


137 


115 


116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


Garrett 














3 


1 




1 


Harford 


86 


98 


87 


ii2 


96 


li2 


141 


167 


177 


178 




81 


68 


87 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


Kent 


87 


96 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


Montgomery . . . 


237 


223 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


Prince George's . 


474 


482 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


Queen Anne's . . . 


88 


92 


71 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


St. Mary's 


151 


172 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


Somerset 


183 


144 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


Talbot 


125 


148 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


Washington .... 


31 


39 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


Wicomico 


183 


175 


161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


Worcester 


157 


173 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 



58 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 11 — Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland Elementary Schools for 
Years Ending June 30, 1949 and 1950 



County 


White Schools 


Colored 


Schools 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


State Average. . 


*91. 





*91.5 


*89.7 


*90.1 


Baltimore City 


88. 


5 


89.5 


89.1 


89.4 




*92. 


2 


*92.3 


*90.5 


♦91.1 


Allegany 


*94 


5 


*95.3 


96.4 


97.0 


Anne Arundel 


91 


1 


91.5 


*90.2 


*91.0 


Baltimore 


*91 


1 


*91.6 


89.4 


89.8 


Calvert 


92 


4 


91.5 


86.3 


90.0 


Caroline 


94 


9 


93.7 


90.3 


91.8 


Carroll 


92 


7 


93.4 


86.1 


88.8 


Cecil 


90 


5 


91.6 


85.9 


90.1 


Charles 


90 





92.1 


86.0 


87.4 


Dorchester 


95 


2 


93.6 


91.9 


92.2 


Frederick 


92 


1 


93.1 


90.9 


90.3 


Garrett 


92 


5 


92.5 






Harford 


90 


8 


91.9 


90^6 


9i'.5 




92 


1 


92.2 


87.5 


90.9 


Kent 


94 


1 


93.9 


93.0 


92.8 


Montgomery 


91 


2 


90.8 


90.4 


90.8 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


93 





92.5 


*92.5 


*92.2 


93 


.3 


92.6 


95.5 


95.7 


St. Mary's 


91 


.2 


91.9 


87.8 


88.3 


Somerset 


93 


.5 


92.8 


91.5 


92.4 


Talbot 


94 


.0 


93.2 


95.3 


94.8 


Washington 


93 


.0 


92.7 


93.2 


94.2 




*93 


.2 


*92.9 


92.7 


92.6 


Worcester 


93 


.0 


91.1 


89.6 


90.3 



For attendance in 1950 by type of organization, 
* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of 

Frostburg 95.2 

Salisbury 93.6 

Towson 92.7 

Bowie 

Anne Arundel 

Prince George's 



, see TABLE IX. 
State Teachers Colleges: 

95.5 
92.9 
92.8 



92.6 88.4 
93.0 89.9 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



TABLE 12 



Per Cent of Attendance for School Years Ending in June 1949 and 1950 by Type of 
White Elementary School: Counties of Maryland 





Schools Having One- 


Schools Having Two- 


Schools Having Three- 


Graded Schools 


Pattwtv 


Teacher Organization 


Teacher Organization 


Teacher Organization 








1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


County Average . . . 


92 


8 


93 


1 


93 





93 





93 





92 


6 


*92 


1 


*93.6 


Alleganv 


97 


4 






94 


9 


96 


7 


97 


1 


96 


5 


*94 


4 


*95.3 


Anne Arundel . . . 










91 


8 


91 


1 


91 


5 


90 


1 


91 





91.6 


Baltimore 










89 


2 


89 


2 


91 


9 






*91 


1 


*91.6 


Calvert 










94 


9 


94 


8 


96 





95 


3 


91 


9 


90.8 


Caroline 










94 


8 


93 


2 










94 


9 


93.7 


Carroll 










93 


4 


93 


6 










92 


7 


93.4 


Cecil 


92 


8 


94 


5 


89 


5 


91 


7 










90 


5 


91.5 


Charles 


























90 





92.1 


Dorchester 


95 


6 


94 


i 


93 


8 


92 


5 






94 


7 


95 


4 


93.8 


Frederick 


94 


6 


94 


9 


90 


5 


92 


3 


91 


7 


91 


5 


92 


2 


93.3 


Garrett 


91 


4 


92 


4 


94 


2 


94 


1 


94 


3 


91 


4 


92 


2 


92.2 


Harford 


91 


6 


92 


5 


93 





93 


1 


90 


1 


92 


4 


90 


7 


91.7 


Howard 


93 


8 


94 





93 





92 


1 










92 





92.1 


Kent 


94 


5 






93 


7 


93 


5 


9i 


6 


93 


2 


94 


5 


94.1 


Montgomery .... 


81 


8 


92 


9 


90 


3 


90 


7 


93 


2 


93 


5 


91 


2 


90.8 


Prince Georg ?'s . 


97 


3 


93 


4 


94 


7 


93 


5 


91 


8 


91 


5 


92 


9 


92.5 


Queen Anne's . . . 


93 


6 


92 


9 


94 





92 


6 


94 


5 


95 


2 


93 





92.0 


St. Mary's 


91 


4 


92 


3 


91 


9 


91 


4 






92 




90 


8 


92.2 


Somerset 


94 


8 


94 


7 


93 


3 


93 


1 










93 


5 


92.7 


Talbot 


95 


1 


95 


2 


91 


5 


94 


4 


94 


2 


89 


5 


94 


1 


93.3 




94 


3 


92 


6 


93 


3 


93 


3 


93 


8 


92 


7 


93 





92.7 


Wicomico 


93 


1 






95 


3 


93 


5 


93 


7 


92 


4 


*93 


1 


*92.9 


Worcester 










94 


1 


93 





93 


8 


92 


8 


92 


8 


90.6 



* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



60 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 13 — An Index of School Attendance in Maryland County Elementary Schools 
for School Year Ending June 30, 1950 





White Schools 


Colored Schools 






Per Cent of 






Per Cent of 
































Attendance 
t 


Late 
Entrants J 


With- 
drawals 


Attendance 
t 


Late 
Entrants J 


With- 
drawals 


County Average 


92.3 


0.1 


0.4 


91.1 


1.3 


0.5 


Allegany 


95.3 


0.1 


0.4 


97.0 








91.5 


0.2 


0.4 


91.0 


i.6 


'6.4 


Baltimore 


91.6 


0.2 


0.4 


89.8 


1.0 


0.5 


Calvert 


91.5 




0.2 


90.0 


2.6 


0.5 




93.7 


*6!i 


0.6 


91.8 


0.3 


0.2 


Carroll 


93.4 


0.1 


0.4 


88.8 




0.7 


Cecil 


91.6 


0.1 


0.3 


90.1 


'i.6 






92.1 


0.2 


0.5 


87.4 


4.5 


'6.6 


Dorchester 


93.6 




0.3 


92.2 


0.5 


0.2 


Frederick 


93.1 




0.3 


90.3 




0.3 




92.5 




0.5 






Harford 


91.9 


'6.2 


0.7 


9^5 


i.6 


'6.7 




92.2 




0.6 


90.9 


0.3 


0.5 


Kent 


93.9 


o.i 


0.1 


92.8 


0.4 


0.2 




90.8 


0.2 


0.4 


90.8 


1.0 


1.2 


Prince George's 


92.5 


a 


0.3 


92.2 


0.7 


0.5 




92.6 






95.7 








91.9 


'6.2 


'6.5 


88.3 


"i'.i 


0.6 




92.8 


0.1 


0.6 


92.4 


i.i 


0.8 


Talbot 


93.2 


0.1 


0.7 


94.8 


1.5 


0.8 


Washington 


92.7 


0.1 


0.5 


94.2 






Wicomico 


92.9 


0.1 


0.8 


92.6 


o.i 


'6.6 




91.1 


0.2 


0.5 


90.3 


0.7 


0.1 















* Excludes elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t For per cent of attendance for all types of schools, see TABLE IX. 

t Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. ... 

° Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, commitment to an institution, or death. 

a Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 61 



TABLE 14 — Per Cent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools for Years 
Ending June 30, 1949 and 1950 



County 


White 


Schools 




Colored 


Schools 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


State Average* 


92 


5 


92 


6 


90 


5 


89.6 


Baltimore City* 


91 


7 


92 





90 


3 


89.6 


County Average .... 


92 


9 


92 


8 


90 


7 


89.5 


Allegany 


95 


2 


95 


4 


95 





95.6 


Anne Arundel 


92 


1 


92 


1 


84 


9 


87.7 


Baltimore 


91 


8 


91 


7 


92 


6 


91.6 


Calvert 


92 


7 


92 


7 


91 


8 


91.6 


Caroline 


94 


2 


94 


5 


89 


3 


90.7 


Carroll 


94 


4 


94 


5 


89 


8 


89.1 


Cecil 


91 


4 


91 


2 


88 


7 


89.8 


Charles 


91 


7 


92 





88 


7 


90.3 


Dorchester 


94 


5 


93 


9 


91 


5 


91.8 


Frederick 


93 





93 





93 


8 


90.1 


Garrett 


91 


9 


91 


7 










92 


7 


92 


9 


93 


2 


92^3 




93 


3 


93 


3 


91 


4 


90.5 


Kent 


92 


4 


92 


4 


94 


3 


93.6 


Montgomery 


92 


6 


92 


5 


87 





86.8 


Prince George's 


92 


6 


92 


3 


92 





91.0 


Queen Anne's 


93 


5 


93 


1 


92 


1 


92.0 


St. Mary's 


91 


1 


91 


6 


85 


4 


85.9 


Somerset 


94 


9 


94 





92 


5 


92.1 


Talbot 


92 


7 


93 


7 


94 


1 


92 3 




92 


2 


92 


4 


93 


9 


93.6 




95 


1 


95 





92 


2 


91.7 


Worcester 


93 


5 


93 





92 


3 


92.0 



* Includes pupils in vocational schools. 

For attendance in 1950 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 



TABLE 15— Number of Boys and Girls Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland County 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Grade 


White and Colored 


White 


Colored 






















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


215,500 


110,168 


105,332 


182,635 


93,576 


89,059 


32,865 


16,592 


16,273 


Kindergarten . . 


2,544 


1,311 


1,233 


2,544 


1,311 


1,233 








1* 


27,373 


14,476 


12,897 


23,059 


12,114 


10,945 


4,314 


2,362 


1,952 


2 


25,111 


13,021 


12,090 


21,121 


10,957 


10,164 


3,990 


2,064 


1,926 


3 


22,278 


11,525 


10,753 


18,526 


9,567 


8,959 


3,752 


1,958 


1,794 


4 


21,355 


11,150 


10,205 


17,606 


9,156 


8,450 


3,749 


1,994 


1,755 


5 


19,786 


10,189 


9,597 


16,436 


8,519 


7,917 


3,350 


1,670 


1,680 


6 

7t 


19,555 


9,967 


9,588 


16,385 


8,436 


7,949 


3,170 


1,531 


1,639 


18,401 


9,507 


8,894 


15,653 


8,141 


7,512 


2,748 


1,366 


1,382 


8t 


16,555 


8,531 


8,024 


14,107 


7,293 


6,814 


2,448 


1,238 


1,210 


9/1 


14,801 


7,223 


7,578 


12,677 


6,277 


6,400 


2,124 


946 


1,178 


10/11 


12,417 


5,972 


6,445 


10,866 


5,257 


5,609 


1,551 


715 


836 


11 AH 


9,796 


4,515 


5,281 


8,582 


3,974 


4,608 


1,214 


541 


673 


12/IVt 


4,989 


2,410 


2,579 


4,553 


2,218 


2,335 


436 


192 


244 


Special Classes 


539 


371 


168 


520 


356 


164 


19 


15 


4 



Enrollment excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

* Includes enrollment in junior first grade. 

t Includes enrollment in elementary and junior high schools. 

% Includes 29 white boys, 19 white girls, and 1 colored boy, who were post-graduates. 



62 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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64 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 18 — Causes for Nonpromotion of Maryland County White Elementary Pupils* 
Not Promoted by Year 1941-1950, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year 
County 


Total 
Not 
Promoted 


Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 


All Causes 


00 

3 

"3 

a 

I 

a. 
fc 


Irregular Attendance 
Not Due to 
Sickness 


Late Entrance 


16 Years or Over, 
Employed 


Mental Incapacity 


Unfortunate Home 
Conditions and 
Lack of Interest 


Transfer from 
Another School 


Other Causes 


BY YEAR 


1940-41 _ „..„ 


10,685 


10.1 


1.1 


1.0 


0.2 


0.6 


1.3 


3.8 


0.6 


1.5 


1941-42 


10,287 


9.6 


1.1 


1.0 


0.2 


0.6 


1.1 


3.7 


0.6 


1.3 


1942-43 


11,255 


10.3 


1.1 


1.3 


0.2 


0.6 


1.1 


3.9 


0.6 


1.5 


1943-44 


10,585 


9.8 


1.1 


1.0 


0.2 


0.5 


1.0 


4.0 


0.5 


1.5 


1944-45 - 


8,083 


7.3 


0.9 


0.9 


0.1 


0.4 


0.7 


2.8 


0.3 


1.2 


1945-46f 


4,852 


5.0 


0.6 


0.4 


0.1 


0.2 


0.5 


1.9 


0.3 


1.0 


1946-47t - 


3,040 


3.1 


0.5 


0.2 


0.1 


0.1 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1947-48f 


3,027 


3.0 


0.4 


0.2 


0.1 


X 


0.4 


1.2 


0.2 


0.5 


1948-49t 


3,327 


3.1 


0.4 


0.2 


0.1 


I 


0.3 


1.2 


0.2 


0.7 


1949-50t 


3,003 


2.6 


0.4 


0.1 


0.1 


X 


0.2 


1.0 


0.1 


0.7 



BY COUNTY 1949-50T 



Allegany 


254 


3.0 


0.3 


0.1 


0.1 


t 


0.3 


1 





* 


1.2 


Anne Arundel 


430 


4.8 


0.7 


0.2 


0.1 


X 


0.3 


2 


6 


0.2 


0.7 


Baltimore 


313 


1.5 


0.3 


0.1 


0.1 


X 


X 





5 


0.1 


0.4 


Calvert 


17 


2.1 


0.1 


0.1 




0.1 





4 




1.4 


Caroline 


91 


5.8 


0.6 


0.3 


o.i 




0.8 


1 


4 


o.i 


2.5 


Carroll 


116 


2.7 


0.4 


0.1 


0.1 




0.6 





8 


0.1 


0.6 


Cecil 


70 


2.3 


0.3 


0.1 






0.5 





8 


0.2 


0.4 


Charles 


65 


4.1 


0.9 


0.2 


o!i 




0.9 





2 


0.1 


1.7 


Dorchester 


51 


2.7 


1.2 




0.1 






1 


2 


0.1 


0.1 


Frederick 


33 


0.6 


0.3 








o.i 





2 


I 




Garrett 


70 


2.1 


0.6 


t' 


o'i 




0.3 





8 


0.1 


0^2 


Harford 


123 


2.5 


0.4 


0.1 


X 






1 


4 




0.5 


Howard 


120 


5.9 


0.6 


0.8 


0.2 




0.7 


3 





0^2 


0.4 


Kent 


41 


4.1 


0.5 


0.1 






0.1 


1 


8 


0.4 


1.2 


Montgomery 


365 


2.3 


0.2 


0.1 


o.i 




0.1 





6 


0.1 


1.1 


Prince George's 


376 


2.5 


0.4 


0.1 


0.1 




0.2 


1 





0.1 


0.6 




54 


4.6 


0.3 


0.1 








2 


8 


0.4 


1.0 


St. Mary's 


55 


5.2 


0.4 


0.4 


o.i 




o.i 


2 


2 


0.4 


1.6 


Somerset 


70 


5.1 


0.7 


0.2 






0.6 


2 


2 


0.1 


1.3 


Talbot 


40 


3.1 


0.6 


0.1 


o.i 






1 


6 


0.3 


0.4 


Washington 


81 


1.0 


0.2 


0.2 


t 




o.i 





3 


X 


0.2 




148 


4.6 


0.5 






o.i 


0.8 


2 


6 


0.4 


0.2 


Worcester 


20 


1.2 


0.4 













4 




0.4 



* Excludes pupils attending the'elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



TABLE 19 — Causes for Nonpromotion of Maryland County Colored Elementary 
Pupils* Not Promoted by Year 1941-1950: by County for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year 
County 



Total 
Not 
Promoted 



Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



5 a 



r o a 



o 

2 c 



hi 

S 2 c 

c °~ 

3.5o 

O C o 



BY YEAR 



1940-41 


3,663 


16 


1 


1 


8 


3 





0.5 


1.0 





9 


7 





0.7 


1.2 


1941-42 


3,645 


16 


2 


1 


4 


3 


1 


0.4 


0.9 





9 


7 


5 


0.6 


1.4 


1942-43 


3,891 


17 


6 


1 


5 


4 


4 


0.3 


1.0 





9 


7 


5 


0.5 


1.5 


1943-44 


3,788 


17 


2 


1 


7 


4 


2 


0.5 


0.8 





9 


7 


3 


0.7 


1.1 


1944-45 


3,464 


15 


2 


1 


2 


3 


8 


0.4 


0.7 





8 


6 


8 


0.6 


0.9 


1945-46t 


2,491 


11 





1 


2 


3 


1 


0.3 


0.4 





5 


4 


5 




1.0 


1946-47f 


2,043 


9 


4 


I 





2 


3 


0.3 


0.3 





5 


4 


1 


0.3 


0.6 


1947-48f 


1,793 


8 


2 





9 


1 


9 


0.3 


0.3 





4 


3 


6 


0.2 


0.6 


1948-49f 


1,640 


7 


2 





7 




4 


0.2 


0.1 





3 


3 


9 


0.3 


0.3 


1949-50t 


1,553 


6 


7 





7 




2 


0.1 


t 





2 


3 


7 


0.3 


0.5 


BY COUNTY 1949-50f 


Allegany 


9 


5 


6 





6 





6 










1 


3 




3.1 


Anne Arundel 


277 


9 


2 





7 


1 


9 


0.3 







2 


5 


6 


0^3 


0.2 


Baltimore 


105 


3 


9 





5 





6 


0.1 


0.1 






1 


8 


t 


0.8 


Calvert 


120 


11 


8 





5 


1 


4 


0.1 







i 


8 


9 


0.1 


0.7 


Caroline 


55 


10 





2 


5 





6 









2 


6 


5 


0.2 




Carroll 


8 


2 


9 





4 





7 






1 


4 





4 






Cecil 


16 


5 


3 





3 





7 










2 


3 




2.6 


Charles 


195 


12 


3 


1 





4 


4 


o!i 







4 


4 


8 


i.6 


0.6 


Dorchester 


68 


6 


5 


1 


3 





2 


0.1 








3 


5 


0.2 


1.2 


Frederick 


3 





5 





3 

















2 






Garrett 
































Harford 


' 41 


6 


2 





9 





6 


0^2 




'o 


2 


3 


9 


0^2 


0^2 


Howard 


19 


3 


3 





2 





7 


0.2 








1 


3 


0.7 


0.2 


Kent 


34 


7 


3 





2 





9 









9 


5 


3 






Montgomery 


121 


7 


5 


1 


4 


1 


5 


o.i 


oii 





2 


•3 


3 


0.4 


0.5 


Prince George's 


239 


7 


1 





7 





9 


0.2 







3 


3 


9 


0.5 


0.2 


Queen Anne's 


4 





8 





2 




















0.6 


St. Mary's 


65 


9 


4 


1 





2 


6 


o!i 








4 


8 


0.3 


0.6 


Somerset 


41 


4 


2 










6 


0.4 







5 


2 






0.5 


Talbot 


70 


9 


5 





7 


1 


7 


0.3 







3 


6 


2 




0.3 


Washington 


1 





5 









5 


















Wicomico 


62 


5 


4 





8 








o'.i 


1 


6 


2 


8 


0*7 




Worcester 

































* Excludes pupils attending the elementary school of Bowie State Teachers College. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

j Less than 0.1 per cent. 



66 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 20 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade* in Maryland 
County Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 



White Schools 



First Grade Nonpromotions 



Number 



Per Cent 





Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties: 


























1949 


769 


411 


6 


9 


4 





345 


218 


14 


8 


10 


4 


1950 


789 


473 


6 


5 


4 


3 


345 


196 


14 


6 


10 





Allegany 


67 


49 


8 


3 


7 





3 


1 


16 


7 


8 


3 




102 


77 


10 


9 


8 


1 


45 


30 


16 


2 


12 


4 


Baltimore 


89 


69 


4 





3 


3 


30 


13 


10 


3 


5 


5 


Calvert 


9 


3 


11 





3 


6 


28 


12 


23 


7 


14 


3 


Caroline 


18 


7 


11 


1 


4 


8 


7 


8 


13 


2 


16 


3 


Carroll 


41 


13 


8 


7 


3 


3 


3 


2 


11 


5 


8 





Cecil 


7 


5 


2 





1 


6 


1 


1 


2 


8 


3 


6 


Charles 


12 


5 


6 


5 


3 


2 


48 


15 


27 





11 


2 


Dorchester 


8 


12 


4 


4 


6 


9 


8 


15 


8 


9 


17 


6 


Frederick 


12 


10 


2 


4 


2 


1 


2 




4 









Garrett 


23 


16 


7 


6 


5 


9 














Harford 


31 


27 


6 


2 


5 


8 


4 


4 


6 


6 


io 


3 


Howard 


20 


8 


10 


1 


4 


5 


8 


3 


12 


3 


5 


6 


Kent 


9 


6 


9 





8 





4 


3 


9 


1 


6 


8 


Montgomery 


130 


69 


8 


1 


5 


1 


41 


21 


22 


3 


14 


G 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


110 


51 


6 


1 


3 


2 


58 


34 


18 





12 


6 


11 


2 


8 


3 


1 


8 














St. Mary's 


12 


4 


8 


8 


3 


8 


ii 


io 


12 


9 


ii 


5 


Somerset 




1 









8 


8 


7 


7 


5 


8 





Talbot 


15 


8 


11 


8 


6 


2 


23 


10 


28 





16 


9 


Washington 


28 


13 


4 


2 


2 


1 














Wicomico 


25 


15 


8 


1 


5 


3 


i3 


'i 


ii 


2 


'8 


5 


Worcester 


10 


3 


5 


8 


2 


1 















Colored Schools 



First Grade Nonpromotions 



Number 



Per Cent 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, but includes pupils 
in junior first grade. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



TABLE 21 



Number and Per Cent of Maryland County Elementary* Pupils Over- Age: 
November 1945, 1947, 1949 





Number Over-Age 1949 


Per Cent of Elementary Pupils Over-Age 


County 












1949 




Total j Boys 


Girls 


1945 


1947 


1949 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



Total Counties. . . 


3,768 


2,516 


1,252 


9 


.0 


5.5 


3 


.2 


4 


.1 


2.2 


Allegany 


229 


141 


88 


6 


6 


4.7 


2 


.7 


3 


.2 


2.2 


Anne Arundel .... 


390 


248 


142 


9 


.1 


6.8 


4 


.4 


5 


.5 


3.3 


Baltimore 


624 


413 


211 


14 


9 


7.2 


2 


.8 


3 


.6 


2.0 


Calvert 


35 


22 


13 


9 


5 


7.2 


4 


4 


5 





3.6 


Caroline 


33 


25 


8 


8 


2 


4.4 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1.1 


Carroll 


148 


107 


41 


9 


3 


6.1 


3 


5 


4 


8 


2.1 


Cecil 


191 


125 


66 


11 


4 


8.0 


6 


2 


7 


9 


4.3 


Charles 


73 


44 


29 


13 





8.8 


4 


5 


5 


2 


3.9 


Dorchester 


56 


41 


15 


9 


6 


6.0 


3 





4 


2 


1.6 


Frederick 


59 


43 


16 


3 


1 


1.6 


1 


1 


1 


5 


0.6 


Garrett 


284 


192 


92 


14 


7 


11.5 


8 


4 


10 


9 


5.7 


Harford 


272 


171 


101 


11 


8 


8.9 


5 


6 


6 


9 


4.2 


Howard 


166 


119 


47 


19 


3 


14.6 


8 


3 


11 


3 


4.9 


Kent 


35 


25 


10 


6 


3 


4.8 


3 


5 


4 


5 


2.2 


Montgomery 


279 


188 


91 


4 


8 


3.4 


1 


8 


2 


4 


1.3 


Prince George's . . 


307 


209 . 


98 


6 


2 


2.8 


2 





2 


7 


1.4 


Queen Anne's .... 


52 


36 


16 


9 


3 


6.0 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2.9 


St. Mary's 


75 


58 


17 


13 


5 


7.0 


6 


3 


9 





3.1 


Somerset 


75 


51 


24 


11 





7.4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


3.7 


Talbot 


47 


32 


15 


10 


6 


5.5 


3 


6 


4 


7 


2.3 


Washington 


42 


23 


19 


1 


1 


0.7 





5 





6 


0.5 


Wicomico 


219 


152 


67 


12 


6 


8.8 


6 


8 


9 


2 


4.3 


Worcester 


77 


51 


26 


8 


1 


4.4 


5 





6 


3 


3.5 


COLORED 


Total Counties . . . 


2,535 


1,675 


860 


19 


2 


15.1 


11 





14 


1 


7.7 


Allegany 


5 


4 


1 


10 


6 


7.8 


3 


1 


4 


6 


1.4 


Anne Arundel .... 


484 


317 


167 


24 


4 


18.0 


15 


7 


20 


1 


11.0 


Baltimore 


317 


214 


103 


28 


1 


21.4 


11 


5 


14.5 


8.0 


Calvert 


211 


141 


70 


26 


5 


24.4 


20 


9 


26.3 


14.8 


Caroline 


53 


40 


13 


10 


9 


9.8 


9 


6 


13 


8 


5.0 


Carroll 


17 


11 


6 


16 


7 


9.8 


6 


1 


8 


7 


3.9 


Cecil 


19 


12 


7 


10 


3 


4.3 


6 


4 


8 


2 


4.7 


Charles 


233 


142 


91 


16 


7 


16.4 


15 


5 


18 


3 


12.6 


Dorchester 


43 


31 


12 


9 


9 


6.6 


4 


1 


5 


8 


2.3 


Frederick 


1 




1 


4 


6 


1.5 





1 






0.3 


Garrett 
























Harford 


35 


21 


*i4 


15 


4 


8^4 


5 


3 


5 


8 


i'j 


Howard 


73 


50 


23 


16 


2 


13.5 


13 





16 


2 


9.1 


Kent 


24 


18 


6 


15 


2 


9.8 


4 


8 


7 


3 


2.6 


Montgomery 


186 


109 


77 


16 


8 


15.9 


11 


5 


13 


9 


9.3 


Prince George's . . 


334 


220 


114 


22 


8 


16.6 


10 


2 


13 


3 


7.1 


Queen Anne's .... 


29 


18 


11 


9 


4 


6.9 


5 


8 




8 


4.7 


St. Mary's 


88 


56 


32 


21 


2 


15.4 


12 


6 


15 


6 


9.5 




118 


84 


34 


17 


7 


16.0 


12 


2 


16 





7.7 


Talbot 


61 


40 


21 


22 


8 


19.6 


8 


2 


10 


5 


5.8 


Washington 


7 


5 


2 


9 


6 


5.3 


3 


8 


5 


2 


2.3 




115 


84 


31 


13 


7 


12.0 


10 


1 


14 


4 


5.6 


Worcester 


82 


58 


24 


11 


6 


11.0 


9 





12 


1 


5.5 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



68 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 22 



Age-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Boys Enrolled November, 1949 





Total 


Elementary Grade* 




High 


School Year 


AGEf 


All 

Grades 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8/1 | 9/II 


10/ 

III 


11/ 

IV 


12a 



WHITE BOYS 



5 and under t 


3,317 


3,309 


8 


























6° 


11,111 


7,972 


3,131 


8 
























7 


9,603 


773 


6,515 


2,302 


12 


1 




















8 


8,817 


73 


1,044 


5,728 


1,957 


15 




















9 


8,192 


12 


156 


1,261 


5,214 


1,530 


19 


















10 


7,825 


4 


23 


208 


1,461 


4,607 


1,486 


1 




34 


1 










11 


7,772 


1 


7 


38 


332 


1,712 


4,331 


92 




1,227 


32 










12 


7,385 




1 


5 


88 


483 


1,783 


305 


10 


3,549 


1,123 


38 








13 


7,080 






3 


23 


124 


628 


182 


32 


1,646 


3,375 


1,040 


26 






14 


6,865 








2 


12 


145 


92 


15 


756 


1,815 


3,038 
1,473 


959 


31 




15 


5,717 










5 


26 


18 


2 


172 


743 


2,518 


745 


15 


16 


4,351 












2 


2 




17 


108 


462 


1,255 


2,051 


454 


17 


2,390 


















2 


6 


90 


322 


920 


1,050 


18 


666 




















1 


8 


53 


215 


389 


19 


141 










i 








i 






4 


32 


103 


Over 19 


35 
























2 


9 


24 


Total number 


91,267 


12,144 


10,885 


9,553 


9,089 


8,490 


8,420 


692 


59 


7,404 


7,204 


6,149 


5,139 


4,004 


2,035 


Number over-age . . 


5,645 


90 


187 


254 


445 


625 


801 


112 


2 


947 


858 


560 


381 


256 


127 


Percent over-age . . . 


6.2 


0.7 


1.7 


2.7 


4.9 


7.4 


9.5 


16.2 


3.4 


12.8 


11.9 


9.1 


7.4 


6.4 


6.2 



COLORED BOYS 



5 and under 


520 


520 




























6 


1,792 


1,445 


341 


6 
























7 


1,751 


328 


1,149 


274 
























8 


1,696 


55 


394 


996 


243 


8 




















9 


1,693 


18 


123 


446 


884 


218 


4 


















10 


1,508 


4 


35 


168 


497 


627 


177 


















11 


1,453 


5 


8 


50 


204 


425 


617 


43 




95 


6 










12 


1,366 




7 


25 


93 


228 


369 


129 




367 


141 


7 








13 


1,407 




2 


14 


29 


110 


226 


101 




317 


476 


128 


4 






14 


1,268 




2 


1 


16 


35 


115 


32 




184 


365 


394 


113 


11 




15 


1,021 






1 


3 


11 


34 


12 




79 


192 


249 


338 


101 


1 


16 


633 










1 


5 


4 




15 


44 


118 


193 


218 


35 


17 


323 










1 








5 


12 


36 


65 


117 


87 


18 


93 






















2 


13 


38 


40 


19 


25 






















1 


2 


8 


14 


Over 19 


27 






















1 


2 


19 


5 


Total number 


16,576 


2,375 


2,061 


1,981 


1,969 


1.664 


1,547 


321 




1,062 


1,236 


936 


730 


512 


182 


Number over-age . . 


2,530 


82 


177 


259 


345 


384 


380 


48 




283 


248 


158 


82 


65 


19 


Percent over-age . . . 


15.3 


3.5 


8.6 


13.1 


17.5 


23.2 


24.6 


15.0 




26.6 


20.1 


16.9 


11.2 


12.7 


10.4 



* Excludes pupils in special classes and enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Age September 1, 1949. 

X Excludes 1,346 in Kindergarten. 

° Excludes 2 in Kindergarten. 

a Excludes 27 post-graduates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 23 



Age-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Girls Enrolled November, 1949 





Total 


Elementary Grade* 


High School Year 


AGEf 


All 
Grades 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8/1 


9 /II 


10/ 
III 


11/ 
IV 


12a 



WHITE GIRLS 



5 and underj 


3,277 


3,273 


4 


























6 


10,455 


7,174 


3,280 


1 
























7 


9,146 


450 


6,117 


2,561 


18 






















8 


8,366 


37 


649 


5,542 


2,114 


24 




















9 


7,814 


5 


69 


717 


5,173 


1,831 


19 


















10 


7,660 


1 


10 


117 


885 


4,756 


1,852 


1 




38 












11 


7,347 


1 


1 


25 


173 


1,035 


4,457 


127 




1,495 


33 










12 


7,022 




1 


9 


38 


234 


1,201 


373 


8 


3,731 


1,392 


34 








13 


6,992 






1 


4 


66 


318 


133 


19 


1,102 


3,839 


1,473 


36 


1 




14 


6,552 








2 


9 


69 


33 


11 


344 


1,165 


3,511 


1,377 


31 




15 


5,854 










4 


11 


7 


2 


78 


338 


1,094 


3,137 


1,159 


24 


16 


4,327 












4 


1 




6 


36 


206 


776 


2,582 


716 


17 


2,102 


















1 


5 


37 


149 


715 


1,195 


18 


320 


















1 




2 


13 


93 


211 


19 


52 






















1 


2 


18 


31 


Over 19 ; 


8 
























1 


2 


5 


Total number 


87,294 


10,941 


10,131 


8,973 


8,407 


7,959 


7,931 


675 


40 


6,796 


6,808 


6,358 


5,492 


4,601 


2,182 


Number over-age . . 


2,622 


44 


81 


152 


217 


313 


402 


41 


2 


431 


379 


246 


165 


113 


36 


Percent over-age . . . 


3.0 


0.4 


0.8 


1.7 


2.6 


3.9 


5.1 


6.1 


5.0 


6.3 


5.6 


3.9 


3.0 


2.5 


1.6 



COLORED GIRLS 



5 and under 


489 


488 


1 


























6 


1,633 


1,219 


413 


1 
























7 


1,691 


217 


1,108 


364 


2 






















8 


1,684 


26 


315 


1,020 


316 


7 




















9 


1,623 


5 


70 


286 


951 


306 


5 


















10 


1,566 


2 


20 


84 


317 


828 


305 






10 












11 


1,487 


1 


3 


29 


111 


387 


747 


48 




157 


4 










12 


1,389 




2 


13 


27 


117 


371 


179 




470 


199 


11 








13 


1,336 






2 


15 


41 


149 


66 




242 


584 


230 


7 






14 


1,275 






1 


7 


17 


52 


26 




108 


291 


582 


181 


10 




15 


1,055 








1 


2 


16 


10 




40 


110 


249 


432 


190 


5 


16 


665 






i 




2 


1 


3 




4 


25 


70 


188 


322 


49 


17 


277 












1 






1 


2 


23 


41 


108 


101 


18 


83 














i 








1 


10 


26 


45 


19 


17 






















2 




4 


11 


Over 19 


4 




















"i 






1 


1 


Total number 


16,274 


1,958 


1,932 


1,801 


1,747 


1,707 


1,647 


333 




1,032 


1,216 


1,168 


860 


661 


212 


Number over-age . . 


1,342 


34 


95 


130 


161 


181 


219 


40 




153 


138 


96 


52 


31 


12 


Percent over-age . . . 


8.2 


1.7 


4.9 


7.2 


9.2 


10.6 


13.3 


12.0 




14.8 


11.3 


8.3 


6.0 


4.7 


5.7 



* Excludes pupils in special classes and enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Age September 1, 1949. 

X Excludes 1,288 in Kindergarten. 

a Excludes 16 post-graduates. 



70 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 24— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex-Year, 
1941-1950, and by Color-Sex-County and Baltimore City for Year 
Ending June 30, 1950 



Year 
County 




White 






Colored 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 






BY 


YEAR 








1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


*708 


*249 


*459 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


*659 


♦256 


*403 


1943 


6,741 


2,887 


3,854 


*689 


*271 


*418 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 
6,809 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1947f 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1949 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1950 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1949-50 



Total State 


7,218 


3,606 


3,612 


1,154 


478 


676 


Baltimore City 


2,^33 


1,458 


1,375 


739 


291 


448 


Total Counties 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 


Allegany 


742 


390 


352 


9 


5 


4 




447 


190 


257 


95 


46 


49 


Baltimore 


200 


118 


82 








Calvert 


71 


33 


38 


*43 


i3 


'30 


Caroline 


8 


4 


4 








Carroll 


13 


7 


6 








Cecil 


14 


7 


7 








Charles 


11 


8 


3 








Dorchester 


6 


3 


3 


' 2 


' 2 




Frederick 


390 


158 


232 


25 


14 




Garrett 


9 


5 


4 








Harford 


36 


17 


19 








Howard 














Kent 


"i 


"i 








38 


Montgomery 


J793 


J417 


}376 


73 


35 


Prince George's 


825 


397 


428 


106 


40 


66 


2 




2 








St. Mary's 


26 


12 


14 








Somerset 


4 


2 


2 








Talbot 


14 


7 


7 








Washington 


581 


291 


290 


15 


*io 


"5 


Wicomico 


188 


79 


109 


47 


22 


25 


Worcester 


4 


2 


2 









* Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 

t See footnote * on TABLE 26. 

% Includes 17 boys, 4 girls, graduates of 1950 Summer School. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School Graduates Who 
Entered State Teachers Colleges Fall after Graduation, 1941-1950 





White 


Colored 




High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 


High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 




Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 


Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 










Graduation 










Graduation 




Year 
































Number 


Per Cent 






Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 










Boys 


Girls 














Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1941. . 


3,168 


3,870 


36 


126 


1.1 


3.3 


*249 


*459 


5 


22 


2.1 


5.0 


1942 . . 


3,165 


4,011 


37 


74 


1.2 


1.8 


*256 


*403 




*25 




6.2 


1943 . . 


2,887 


3,854 


23 


88 


0.8 


2.3 


*271 


*418 


8 


20 


3.6 


4.8 


1944 . . 


2,493 


4,057 


15 


72 


1.7 


1.8 


271 


447 


6 


32 


4.5 


7.2 


1945 . . 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


279 


476 


5 


37 


1.8 


7.8 


1946. . 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1947 . . 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3.1 


6.7 


1948. . 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2.0 


6.4 


1949 . . 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


342 


438 


19 


66 


5.6 


15.1 


1950 . . 


2,148 


2,237 


51 


113 


2.4 


5.1 


187 


228 


5 


23 


2.7 


10.1 



* Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five 
years work above grade 7. 

For 1950 graduates and Teachers College entrants for individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



72 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School 
Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working at Home Year Following 

Graduation, 1941-1950 









Number 


Per Cent 


Year of 
Graduation 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



1940 


3,017 


3,796 


699 


1,107 


147 


916 


23 


1 


29 




4 


9 


24 


1 


1941 


3,168 


3,870 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19 


6 


26 





3 


6 


20 





1942 


3,165 


4,011 


539 


832 


24 


540 


17 





20 


7 





8 


13 


5 


1943 


2,887 


3,854 


313 


953 


8 


434 


10 


8 


24 


8 





3 


11 


3 


1944 


2,493 


4,057 


338 


1,177 


12 


448 


13 


6 


29 








5 


11 





1945 


2,545 


3,986 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


1 


30 


9 





7 


14 


7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 




420 


22 


7 


29 


3 


1 


4 


16 


9 


1947 


*3,255 


*4.205 


901 


1,268 


77 


769 


27 


7 


30 


2 


2 


4 


18 


3 


1948 


t3,419 


4,242 


865 


1,282 


68 


277 


25 





30 





2 





6 


5 


1949 


2,800 


3,391 


787 


1,143 


78 


654 


28 


1 


33 


7 


2 


8 


19 


3 



COLORED 



1940 


236 


413 


44 


90 


11 


68 


18.6 


21.8 


4.7 


16.5 


1941 


236 


444 


42 


76 


3 


75 


17.8 


17.2 


1.3 


16.9 


1942 


247 


385 


32 


89 


1 


77 


12.8 


25.4 


0.4 


20.0 


1943 


263 


401 


26 


118 




46 


9.9 


29.4 




11.5 


1944 


271 


447 


53 


145 


"i 


52 


19.6 


32.4 


6^4 


11.7 


1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30.1 


38.4 


0.7 


12.4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22.3 


33.7 


3.3 


19.3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18.8 


28.6 


3.9 


21.4 


1948 


391 


498 


82 


162 


13 


85 


20.9 


32.5 


3.3 


17.0 


1949 


342 


438 


74 


139 


12 


52 


21.6 


31.7 


3.5 


11.9 



* Number of white graduates for 1946-47, as shown on TABLES 24 and 25 is not in agreement with 
number given on TABLE 26. TABLES 24 and 25 include the '46 summer school graduates of Mont- 
gomery County while TABLE 26 excludes these and includes the '47 summer school graduates instead. 
This was necessary because of a change in method of reporting summer school graduates. 

t Includes two boys who received diplomas after June 1948 and were not reported previously. 



Maryland State Department of Educatioi 



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Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 
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80 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 34— Enrollment* in Each Year of Maryland County High Schools by Year, 

1941-1950 



Year 




Grade 


Ending 


Total 
















June 30 




7 


8 


9-1 


10-11 


ll-III 


12-IV 


Post- 


















graduate 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1941 


39,225 






12,554 


10,342 


7,848 


7,323 


1^8 


1942 


39,316 






12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


1943 


38,394 






12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


1944 


36,797 






12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


1945 


37,154 






12,314 


9,842 


8,201 


6,783 


14 


1946 


51,922 


10,745 


6,397 


9,305 


10,090 


8,393 


6,967 


25 


1947 


54,886 


12,025 


11,667 


6,613 


8,043 


8,846 


7,629 


63 


1948 


56,524 


12,445 


12,448 


10,960 


5,571 


7,165 


7,897 


37 


1949 


59,500 


13,576 


12,950 


11,863 


9,718 


5,045 


6,314 


34 


1950 


65,312 


14,624 


14,010 


12,677 


10,866 


8,582 


4,505 


48 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1941 


5,045 






1,961 


1,349 


953 


780 


2 


1942 


5,009 






1,857 


1,450 


994 


708 




1943 


5,159 






1,865 


1,422 


1,088 


784 




1944 


5,083 






1,957 


1,333 


1,004 


789 


... 


1945 


5,138 






1,804 


1,518 


1,016 


799 




1946 


6,899 


1,015 


818 


1,590 


1,475 


1,198 


803 




1947 


7,624 


1,238 


1,823 


1,186 


1,178 


1,178 


1,021 




1948 


8,173 


1,608 


2,128 


1,829 


639 


999 


969 


i 


1949 


8,853 


1,821 


2,340 


1,857 


1,481 


521 


833 




1950 


9,766 


1,993 


2,448 


2,124 


1,551 


1,214 


435 


i 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment of individual high schools see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 81 



TABLE 35 — Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland County 
High Schools for the Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 


English 


7t 


8t 


9t 


10 


11 


12 


Other % 


WHITE 


Total Counties 


14,897 


13,945 


12,580 


11,420 


8,454 


4,316 


1,401 


Allegany 


1,291 


1,221 


1,157 


974 


798 


695 


149 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,101 


984 


857 


779 


565 


471 






2,888 


2,536 


£.,£.00 


£.,OV> 


1 4/lfi 
l,t>4o 


211 


582 


Calvert 


106 


101 


75 


89 


7 


73 




Caroline 


252 


218 


198 


153 


158 


5 




Carroll 


623 


559 


486 


419 


335 






Cecil 


423 


407 


392 


308 


251 


' 2 




Charles 


241 


199 


183 


178 


122 






Dorchester 


290 


254 


232 


216 


147 


io 




Frederick 


725 


715 


662 


556 


440 


396 


46 


Garrett 


332 


357 


287 


252 


104 






Harford 


514 


493 


478 


437 


362 


22 






274 


268 


209 


175 


153 


1 




Kent 


139 


149 


92 


113 


96 






Montgomery . . . 
Pr. George's .... 


1,518 


1,412 


1,292 


1,184 


1,003 


83 i 


322 


2,117 


1,811 


1,660 


1,397 


1,075 


772 


57 


Queen Anne's . . 


205 


152 


131 


103 


93 


1 




St. Mary's 


140 


131 


132 


117 


79 


23 




Somerset 


182 


192 


144 


154 


116 






Talbot 


202 


189 


163 


149 


156 






Washington .... 


1,114 


1,067 


1,040 


911 


710 


600 


186 






327 


316 


262 


193 


203 


59 


Worcester 


220 


203 


161 


148 


143 






COLORED 


Total Counties 


1,955 


2,420 


2,066 


1,566 


1,199 


483 


51 


Allegany 


17 


25 


21 


18 


17 


9 




Anne Arundel . . 


204 


308 


224 


183 


140 


106 




Baltimore 


280 


238 


218 


124 


104 






Calvert 


110 


82 


75 




62 


48 




Caroline 


72 


69 


60 


49 


29 






Carroll 


33 


29 


26 


22 


12 






Cecil 


35 


39 


40 


35 


20 






Charles 


90 


147 


95 


73 


75 






Dorchester 




109 


95 


82 


39 






Frederick 


28 


85 


55 


45 


37 


26 




Garrett 


















87 


102 


73 


59 


48 






Howard 


80 


81 


62 


51 


39 






Kent 


76 


60 


57 


40 


32 






Montgomery . . . 




166 


158 


129 


92 


80 




Pr. George's .... 


334 


332 


255 


248 


149 


149 




Queen Anne's . . 


64 


50 


50 


32 


29 






St. Mary's 


52 


59 


73 


45 


25 


i 




Somerset 


123 


109 


106 


76 


59 






Talbot 


105 


76 


62 


61 


40 






Washington .... 


25 


26 


25 


15 


12 


16 




Wicomico 




106 


128 


109 


74 


48 




Worcester 


140 


122 


108 


70 


65 







* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

X Includes 445 white and 14 colored taking Journalism; 552 white taking Public Speaking; 314 white 
taking Dramatics; 90 white taking Radio Workshop; 26 colored taking American Literature, and 11 
colored taking Business English. 



82 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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S3 



TABLE 37 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies: Maryland 
County High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year 
County 


Social 

•♦— 

a> 
-o 

eS 
i_ 

o 

X 

*i 
t~ 


Studies 

% 
■a 

2 
o 

00 


Civics and Social 
Studies 


World History 


European History 


United States 
History 


Problems of 
Democracy 


Geography 


Economic 
Geography 


Sociology 


Consumer 
Education 


Negro History 


Personal Problems 
and Psychology 


Business Training! 


1947- 


-48 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 




1948- 


-49 


1,827 


2,312 


1,606 


1,092 


15 


858 


383 


186 


214 






141 


45 


77 


1949- 


-50 


1,995 


2,446 


1,704 


1,191 


18 


1,072 


499 


294 


128 






87 


130 


104 



BY COUNTY, 1949-50 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester . . . . 



17 


25 


21 




18 




26 














204 


308 


224 


117 




105 


106 














280 


238 


218 


124 




104 
















110 


82 


76 






65 


32 














72 


69 




50 




29 
















33 


29 


26 






34 
















35 


39 


36 


35 




20 
















90 


147 




73 




37 


38 
















109 


95 






61 


31 














28 


85 




45 




36 


26 














87 


102 


73 


59 




48 
















80 


81 


62 


51 




36 
















76 


60 


57 


40 




32 














32 




166 


158 


20 




94 


20 












36 


374 


358 


290 


209 




116 


115 














64 


50 


50 


32 






29 














52 


59 


17 


66 




17 
















123 


109 


106 


76 




59 














44 


105 


76 


62 






40 
















25 


26 


25 


is 






28 
















106 




109 




74 


48 


84 


44 








is 


140 


122 


108 


70 




65 

















* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

t Includes classes taught by teachers certificated in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject appear 
in TABLE 41. 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 





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1941- 42 

1942- 43 

1943- 44 

1944- 45 

1945- 46 

1946- 47 

1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's . . . 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



TABLE 39 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science in the Maryland 
County High Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Science 


























g 




s 


■ 

V 






S 






Year and 






c 

£ 




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c 






c 






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1947-48 


1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


21 


181 


1948-49 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 


549 


156 


279 




33 


1949-50 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1,190 


57 


157 


581 


307 


92 




61 


BY COUNTY, 1949-50 


Allegany 


17 


25 


21 


18 


16 














Anne Arundel 


205 


308 




120 






96 


106 








Baltimore 


280 


238 


218 


124 




104 












Calvert 


110 


82 










38 


35 








Caroline 


72 


69 


60 


49 






29 










Carroll 


33 


29 


26 








34 










Cecil 


35 


35 


35 


35 






20 










Charles 


90 


147 


95 


73 




2i 


25 










Dorchester 




109 


97 


59 










40 






Frederick 


'28 


85 


55 


37 




8 


9 










Garrett 
























Harford 


38 


45 


73 


23 






16 










Howard 


80 


81 




40 


12 




33 










Kent 


76 


60 


57 


40 






32 










Montgomery 




138 


73 








12 


25 








Prince George's 


178 


183 


256 


184 


22 




102 


56 


52 






64 


50 


50 


32 








29 








St. Mary's 


42 


44 


10 


39 


't 














Somerset 


123 


109 


106 


76 






40 










Talbot 


105 


76 


62 


61 






40 










Washington 


25 


26 


25 


15 








28 








Wicomico 




106 


128 


95 




24 


27 


28 










140 


122 


81 


70 






28 








27 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
X If given in other than 7th and /or 8th grades. 



S6 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 87 



TABLE 41 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and 
Business Education in the Maryland County High Schools, for the Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 





Mathematics 












& 

& 
























'> 


c 






Year and 
County 


W 


9 

•a 

at 


lematics I 


al 

lematics II 


cfl 


Geometry 


lometry 


;matics Re 


ional and 
ied Mather 


Commercial and 
Business 
Arithmetic 


c 

_o 
cd 'X3 
cn jj 




7th Gi 


8th Gi 


Gener,' 
Matl 


Gener; 
Matl 


i— 

S3 

Qi 
< 


Plane 


Trigor 


| Mathc 


Vocati 
Appl: 


ll 
co "O 

PQ 


1947-48 


1,612 
1,819 
1,995 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 


1948-49 


2,229 
2,331 


1,396 


123 


1,001 


311 


35 


329 


176 


380 


386 


1949-50 


1,467 


187 


1,028 


330 


14 


394 


145 


556 


474 











BY COUNTY, 1949-50 



Allegany 


17 


25 






21 








9 








204 


309 






179 


47 




85 




63 


90 


Baltimore 


280 


238 


218 




99 


34 




19 




55 


41 


Calvert 


110 


82 


63 




25 


9 














72 


69 


29 


3i 


20 


13 








16 




Carroll 


33 


29 


26 




11 












23 


Cecil 


35 


39 


40 














44 






90 


136 


70 


25 


26 


21 








21 


60 


Dorchester 






109 


97 


27 


17 












Frederick 


28 


85 


55 




9 






26 






45 


Garrett 
























Harford 


87 


102 


73 


34 














26 


Howard 


80 


81 


62 




i3 


ii 










73 


Kent 


76 


60 


57 










33 




40 




Montgomery 




165 


30 




72 


26 




15 






72 


Prince George's 


373 


359 


254 




231 






114 




72 




Queen Anne's 


64 


50 


50 














61 




St. Mary's 


52 


59 


73 










61 




10 


8 


Somerset 


124 


109 


107 




is 






41 








Talbot 


105 


76 






61 


40 








64 




Washington 


25 


26 






25 


28 












Wicomico 




110 


43 




121 


56 








73 


36 


Worcester 


140 


122 


108 




70 


28 








37 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 37. 



88 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 42 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1941 to 1950 



Year Ending 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 


1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 


1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 


1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 


1945 


1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946f 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947t 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948f 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949f 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 


1950f 


1,684 


2,436 


937 


1,356 


720 


854 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year and 
County 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947- 481 

1948- 49f 

1949- 50f 


23 
16 

22 


29 
18 
28 


22 
45 
90 


59 
103 
106 


1 
4 
13 


20 
36 
32 


BY COUNTY, 1949-50 


Anne Arundel 
Baltimore .... 
Montgomery . . 
Washington. . . 
Wicomico .... 


7 

is 


7 

2i 


30 
41 
15 
4 


34 
31 
30 
11 


13 


32 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1950 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 44 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Years 1941 to 1950 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculturb 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3,287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 


1943 


10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 


1944 


8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946t 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947t 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948t 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949t 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950f 


21,619 


1,488 


3,199 


18,989 


2,532 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year and 
County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1948t 


1,533 
1,599 
2,099 


221 
282 
204 


1,084 
1,247 
1,083 


2,277 
2,533 
2,929 


1,068 
1,275 
1,023 


1949t 


1950t 





BY COUNTY, 1949-50 



Allegany 


24 


25 




22 


19 


Anne Arundel . . . 


47 


102 


43 


277 


126 


Baltimore 


318 






365 




Calvert 


90 




57 


78 


108 


Caroline 


78 




36 


94 




Carroll 


64 




42 


58 




Cecil 


78 




29 


54 


28 


Charles 






144 


63 


78 


Dorchester 


54 




115 


136 


40 


Frederick 


127 






90 


31 


Garrett 












Harford 


158 






136 


26 


Howard 






86 


45 


59 


Kent 






85 


65 


39 


Montgomery .... 


162 


53 


62 


196 


56 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


290 




171 


422 


201 


97 






61 


67 


St. Mary's 


25 




67 


67 


37 


Somerset 


151 






228 




Talbot 


83 


24 


68 


113 


43 


Washington 


57 






62 






196 




35 


264 




Worcester 






43 


33 


65 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any. 

For 1950 enrollment in individual schools, see TABLE XXIII. 



90 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 46— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1941 to 1959 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2.472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946f 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947f 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948t 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949f 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950f 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30,049 


29,236 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948t 


3,017 
3,322 
3,552 


3,584 
3,844 
4,051 


823 
1,217 
1,301 


777 
1,054 
1,166 


3,154 
3,717 
4,147 


3,503 
4,354 
4,504 


1949t 


1950f 





BY COUNTY, 1949-50 



Allegany 


60 


47 






11 


6 


Anne Arundel 


367 


419 


236 


20 


375 


362 


Baltimore .... 


450 


587 


235 


316 


427 


530 


Calvert 






14 


11 


168 


197 


Caroline 


167 


lii 


37 


35 


151 


128 


Carroll 


64 


58 


13 


12 


64 


58 


Cecil 


87 


82 






87 


82 


Charles 


197 


281 


37 


54 


141 


203 


Dorchester . . . 


145 


124 






172 


183 


Frederick 


140 


157 


is 


i3 


142 


134 


Garrett 














Harford 


97 


108 


67 


73 


179 


190 




141 


134 


47 


33 


160 


160 


Kent 


122 


143 


37 


39 


122 


143 


Montgomery. . 


222 


225 


145 


144 


291 


281 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 


542 


605 


139 


139 


675 


770 


72 


92 








102 


St. Mary's 


58 


87 


27 


25 


79 


Somerset 


212 


225 


48 


68 


230 


241 


Talbot 










176 


156 


Washington . . . 


57 


62 


i.9 


32 


57 


62 


Wicomico .... 


112 


209 






200 


251 


Worcester .... 


240 


265 


185 


152 


240 


265 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1950 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



92 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 50 

White and Colored Enrollment in Driver Education and Training : Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Boys 


Girls 


County 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 
Caroline .... 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester. . , 
Garrett 



1,271 


1,720 




115 


109 


Howard 


77 


76 


188 


217 


Montgomery 


95 


213 


41 


71 




157 


216 


180 


91 


Somerset 


4 


4 


17 


31 


Talbot 


57 


79 


31 


83 


Washington 


39 


112 


22 


52 




114 


152 


9 


14 


Worcester 


61 


81 


64 


119 









COLORED SCHOOLS 



Total 

Anne Arundel 
Dorchester. . 
Howard 



173 


177 


Montgomery 


14 


31 






Prince George's 


39 


51 


11 


14 


Talbot 


29 


11 


24 




Wicomico 


47 


63 


9 


7 









94 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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15.4 


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1949 
1950 


1949 
1950 










County 




Per Cent in Tol 
Counties: 


Total Number: 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



95 







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11.4 
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73 

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1950 


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U 




Per Cent in 
Counties: 


XI 

S 

3 








o 



CM -iH ■ • -IQ 



'CM -rH • - CM CO — * • CO Tf— < • CM • -tH 



i co o • <-h • -tiflH • »h eo -t-Lo^-i^cM • • as 



■eo • • -TfcM. 



CM C: CO CM • CM CM 



MCiO • • CM CO 05 



•^Ht-US • • -CM»HO000 



Ml 

<D cii 



- "3 

> ? 



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— a. a> 



Hi O B b 

o o d 

- « o a) °r - ■ c 



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>OOOQfaOKE*!SeL-G^wE-£££ 



Eighty-Fourth 



Annual Report 



h Grade Girls 


o. of 




* (M 
O 


i-i -<<< 


wing N 
ects 


CO 


oo 


COCO 


g Folio 
Subj 


CM 


in CO 
OO 


t- CO 


rWELFT 


Failin 




in t- 
CM CM 


t> CO 

x co 




Total 


M 
C 


1"H CO 

COCO 


occo 

O 00 


B 

J 


o. of 




00 <N 
OO 


OH 
CM i-H 


05 

6 

§ 


wing N 
ects 


CO 


o t- 
1-1 o 


CC CO 
<M CO 


Eleventh Grai 


g Folio 
Subj 


03 


Oi 00 


CO i-H 

t- oo 


Failin 




CM lO 
t- m 


t- CO 

oc m 

i-i <M 


Total 


be 

c 


11.9 

8.2 


OiOO 
o t- 
co eo 




o. of 




t- 00 
OO 


Tj<CC 

eo iJ" 


Girls 


wing N 
ects 


CO 


00 t- 

o o 


Hft 

t eo 


Grade 


g Folio 
Subj 


M 


OiCC 


00 Oi 

os oo 


Tenth 


Failin 




t> iH 

in m 


coos 
oi oc 

CJ (M 




Total 


be 
c 


rH CM 

OS 00 


OS CO 

cc CO 
<* •<* 




o. of 


■«i< 


CSt- 

oo 


Ht- 

m 


Girls 


wing N 
ects 


CO 


00 Oi 

oo' 


in o 

to 


Grade 


g Folio 
Subj 


CJ 


m us 


os co 
oc oi 


Ninth 


Failin 




»H co 

TP 


t- CO 
^J 1 Oi 
<M CM 




Total 


be 
c 


CO c- 


NCO 

eo os 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 


Total Number: 1949 
1950 



•CO O 00 



1 CO -OJi-H ■ CM C- 'HN -COCO 



CO O CO -i-H -mCMi-lCO -CMi-H • OS <N --^ TfCM 



• CO OJ tH «C i-H i-t tH • -Tf • .(N -Tf 



ICM • CM • CO OS i-H i-l eo • CM i-H 



osioon -ihcc -.-in< 



BE 

St 1«: 

=: c a ca 



: 3 8 



43 C 



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en s-; 



ft 8 a 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



97 



h Grade Girls 


o 
c 




CM ■ 

o 




wing N 
ects 


eo 


•^CM 
Oi-I 


CMeo 


g Folio 
Subj 


CM 




§ 

E 


Failir 






Total 
Fail- 
ing 


<OCM 
O iH 


eo eo 


■ 


o. of 


■*f 


o eo 

CM-H 


to OS 


6 

a 
a 


g Following N 
Subjects 


00 


eocM 
^ © 


-* 1 iH 


Eleventh Gra 


CM 


t> CM 


ic oc 


Failir 




o m 

CM CM 


to t- 


Total 
Fail- 


M 
C 


O CM 


— U3 




o. of 




tOtC 
O CM 


ia cm 


Grade Girls 


wing N 
ects 


eo 


t- oc 
oo 


to t> 


g Folio 
Subj 


CM 


eo to 

O iH 


eo eo 


Tenth 


Failir 




t- 00 

eo to 


rt 5 




Total 
Fail- 


M 

C 


5.3 
11.8 


Tf os 




o. of 




00 CM 
© —1 


oo 


, Girls 


wing N 
ects 


eo 


os eo 


OS "3 


Grade 


g Folio 
Subj 


CM 


Tj»CM 

I-i CM 


TftO 

»H CM 


Ninth 


Failir 




CM 00 

eo-* 


CMt- 

eouo 




Total 
Fail- 


bC 

c 


eo io 
to os 


«CM 

to — 


County 


Per Cent in Total 
Counties: 1949 
1950 


Total Number: 1949 
1950 



•CM • -i-l -rt 1 



CMfCM • • -i-H 



l 0C irt t> CM • • -"*»H ■ i— ' CM CM t~- • -i-Hi-l 



icc^eo eot-occa ■ .-i cm tj< n cm <-h c- 



ho-hoo»h • -eoeo 



TftC-^i-l -r-tOOSCM • CMOSCM 



5£ 



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Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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3S3!S§!£3 



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22 



2^222 = 050505 2 



:22^^2 



2° 5 22^222^° 5 



2222: 



2^£^ < 



22222 1 



S2222' 



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iiiiiiiiii 



Maryland State Department of Education 





H 
BS 
D 


N.P 


HWf co m as 

HOB"* 


Aoi 


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ft 


oc <n io Horn 
as oo no 




do 


N.P. 


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ATHEMATICS 


5 


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CCCDlfl t-OH 
■*COiO 


02 


N.P. 


ccc~t- mt-t- 

CM CM CM 




Bo 




t-coio eo-«ft> 

NOW 




JO 


N.P. 


^ co ^ ^ oo t-j 


ICE 


3 




t~ ce io t- as t» 

WHO 

(M CM IM 


a 
o 

W 


00 

Sh 


N.P. 


t-t-t- mot- 
os h m 

HNN 




Bo; 




t-<ao a. cm as 
os as io 




JO 


N.P. 


■fecM rM«*ec 

fiXC 


TUDIEJ 


3 




t- oo as ccj<h 
oc os o 


CIALS 


oa 
>» 


N.P. 


00t-'# CM CM OS 

t-eot> 


o 

CO 


Bo 




eiON co as t> 

H H 




•3 


N.P. 


co co co co o eo 
t> 00 c~ 


ISH 


3 




t- t- 00 t> t- CO 

oc oc os 


»4 

C5 
SB 
H 




N.P. 


OS t> t— CD H OS 




Bo 




t- U5 CO (OH[- 

■»r h cm 






N.P. 


CO ^S* O CO OS 

oc to o 


a 


3 




!D10f OS O O 
O CM O 


Coi 


to 


o 
Cm 


t> uo co Htom 

NOW 




Bo 





t- CO CO CM C— 

H CO OS 


County 


Per Cent in Total 

Counties: 1948 

1949 
1950 

Total Number: 

1948 
1949 

1950 



•CO • ■ CM t~- CO 



•CM CM <— < CM CM lO CM • 


• • oc co cc o -co -ia -cow 


■tCNiMH ■ .-H CM CM CO 
■CMCOrH • HH 


•as • ia co co u< oo co • 

CO 


HCM-^OCMeO-tfOsOCM 
COC0H ,-t 


•muSU3Ot>C0CC©lCCM0SU5 
i-tm HH CM *"H 


Ht-OOCM • -00C0»OCM 


'2 'SmSS^HH 00 CM ' 


HOWlOlflM/Mncio . 
H CM 


•coaseoocecM'-it-oocMuooo 


• lO H kO CM •HCMCO'O' 
•lOCO • H 


•h • eo "0 cc t}< t(< . 


CMLOCC00CM-*l<TfCCCC.-l 
H CO H 


•■^CMU5Ht-eoT(<ooiflCMeoas 


CO ^ CO -H •»MOt» 
t- UO • • H 


■ "5 ■ t> CO CO "* CO OS -CM • 
• NH H CM • 


if O CM CO t- CO CO CO CM • 
i-l CM 


•cc-Mcooci-iCMcoccoccMa. t- 

• H CO 


CM • CM CM • -H0CCCC0 


• h •oi'ioeoH -io • 


COCOO<OCO-«3">* I OCCOCM 
CM CM >— 1 H 


•CMoo'*coTj'eoocioeot-i»-io 

HH H CM H 


CO CO CO CM H • 00 CO • CM 


•CO -HtOiOCOt-COH -CO • 


-toccoLrauoccTfeoccH 


•cooocoiflcecMHoouocM-^'io 


HCOCMCCCM • I oc oc CO 


■ HHNS)^»H • • lO • 


cocooiocM-^TfoceoCM 

CM rt 


•CMoo^HoseoooeocOHTfo 

CM H H CM H 


00 CO OC CM • OC CO C CM 


• CM CO CM O CO ec t> ^ • -as • 
CM H • • CM • 


Tft-coiOiflce^eotCH 


•maseococecMHTfiocMicm 


•t<C ■ • • - CM CM 
• Tf CM 


•UOUOCMlOOO • -HTfH • • 


■ a. co • • • -tj<co • 


■lO^HMH • • 0C CM H -U5 
H CM • • 


• CM Tf • • • • TflO 

• LO CM .... 


•00WCOHCO • -coo • • • 


•ocas cm • • co ■ • 


•COCO • CO CM • ■ • -co 

•HC0 • • 



■73 

§f?=2 



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h, a> c - 



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100 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



3 $ 



2h 



Si 

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IS 

| 2 

3*^ 



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-= be 

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■SI'S 

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H»t- t-lOt-HHMLOLl 

H WW NHNWHH 



h 50 c. c 
c«CQ «s 

0) >>•- IT 

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43 03 
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' 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 58 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools: Number of Principals and Teachers: Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 









General Supervisors by Type of 
School 






County 


Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Total 
Super- 
visors 


Elementary 


High 


Other 
Super- 
visorst 


Pupil 
Personnel 




White 


Colored 





Total State 


11,521 


1 


191 


6 


52 


3 


17.8 


46 


3 


75.2 


86 


6 


Baltimore City 


4,091 


1 


65 


4 


8 





4.0 


13 





40.4 


43 





Total Counties 


7,430 





126 


2 


44 


3 


13.8 


33 


3 


34.8 


43 


6 


Allegany 


544 


3 


8 


2 


3 





t 


1 


5 


3.7 


3 


3 


Anne Arundel .... 


581 


6 


7 


9 


3 





1.0 


2 





1.9 


3 





Baltimore 


1,130 


1 


17 


8 


4 


8 


1.0 


4 


3 


7.7 


6 





Calvert 


92 


7 


2 





1 





1.0 








1 





Caroline 


123 


3 


2 


4 


1 





0.4 


i 


6 




1 





Carroll 


260 


1 


4 


9 


2 





0.4 


l 





i.5 


2 





Cecil 


200 


8 


3 


2 


2 





t 


l 





0.2 


1 







163 


6 


2 





1 





0.6 





4 




1 





Dorchester 


173 


2 


3 





1 





1.0 


l 







1 





Frederick 


337 





5 


1 


1 


5 


0.5 


l 


5 


1.6 


1 





Garrett 


174 


5 


3 





2 







l 







1 





Harford 


289 





4 


2 


2 





6.7 


l 


5 




1 


8 




149 


a 


3 





1 





0.6 


l 


4 




1 





Kent 


92 


6 


2 


5 


1 





0.5 


l 







1 







861 


2 


16 





5 





1.0 


4 





6.6 


4 





Prince George's. . . 


957 


3 


15 


9 


4 





1.0 


3 





7.9 


5 





Queen Anne's .... 


100 





2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1 










5 


St. Mary's 


105 


6 


2 


8 







0.8 


1 







1 







128 





2 


5 


1 





0.3 


1 


2 




1 





Talbot 


122 





2 


5 


1 





0.5 


1 







1 





Washington 


504 


5 


8 


8 


3 





X 


1 


5 


4.3 


3 





Wicomico 


193 





3 





1 





1.0 


1 







2 





Worcester 


146 


3 


3 





1 





1.0 


1 







1 






* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, English, Guidance, Handwriting, Health and 
Physical Education, History, Home Economics, Instruction, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, School 
Lunch, and Special Education. 

t Less than 0.1 of one supervisor's time. 



102 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 59 



Number of Clerks Employed in Maryland County Schools; Salaries 
Paid, 1949-1950 



County 


Number 


Salaries 


County 


Number 


Salaries 




of Clerks 


Paid 




of Clerks 


Paid 



Total Counties 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline. 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick. . . . 
Garrett 



197.7 

9.0 
29.0 
41.7 
3.0 
2.4 
8.0 
8.0 
2.0 
0.4 
12.0 
2.0 



$240,060.06 

14,236.80 
31,737.39 
57,430.57 
3,174.50 
1,661.60 
5,430.00 
4,653.01 
2,519.30 
450.00 
12,431.25 
1,641.20 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



4.0 
6.0 



42.0 



2.0 

6.4 
14.0 
7.3 
4.5 



$4,020.00 
3,075.00 
71.50 
65,298.28 



3,835.70 



416.67 
17,441.57 
8,044.72 
2,491.00 



* Less than 0.1 per cent of one clerk's time. 



TABLE 60 — Repair or Utility Men; Janitors, Cleaners, Firemen, etc., in 
Maryland Public Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Repair 


or Utility Men 




Janitors, 


Cleaners, Firemen, etc. 




County 




Full- 


Part- 


White 


Colored 




Total 


Time 


Time 


Total 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total State 


544 


370 


174 


1,206 


785 


421 


670 


272 


398 


Baltimore City . . 


205 


205 




340 


210 


130 


471 


212 


259 


Total Counties . . 


339 


165 


174 


866 


575 


291 


199 


60 


139 


Allegany 


1 


1 




78 


64 


14 


2 


1 


1 


Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 


24 
12 
2 


16 

5 
2 


' 8 
7 


71 
156 
7 


32 
82 
3 


39 
74 
4 


33 
25 
3 


3 
11 

3 


30 
14 


Caroline 


2 


2 




13 


6 


7 


5 


1 


' 4 


Carroll 


3 


1 


' 2 


18 


16 


2 


1 


1 




Cecil 


2 


2 




18 


18 




3 


3 




Charles 








7 


7 




3 


3 




Dorchester .... 
Frederick 


' 4 


' 4 




19 
43 


17 

23 


' 2 
20 


4 

8 


4 
1 


' '7 


Garrett 


' *3 


' 2 


i 


17 


17 










Harford 


7 


5 


2 


40 


22 


'is 


io 


" 2 


' 8 


Howard 


1 


1 




14 


9 


5 


9 


2 


7 


Kent 


2 


1 


i 


12 


6 


6 


6 


1 


5 


Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 


145 

65 

' i 


45 
63 
1 


100 
2 

' i 


112 
111 
13 
4 
10 
10 


106 
69 
7 
4 
9 
9 


6 
42 
6 

i 

1 


18 
45 
1 
2 
4 
4 


5 
6 
1 
2 
4 
2 


13 
39 

" *2 


Washington . . . 
Wicomico 


62 


12 


50 


62 
18 


32 
12 


30 
6 


2 
2 


2 
1 


"i 


Worcester 


' 2 


' 2 




13 


5 


8 


9 


1 


8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 61 

Parent-Teacher Associations in Maryland County White and Colored Schools: 

1949-1950 



County 




White 


Schools 








Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


1949 


1950 


Total and County Average. 


475 


505 


84 


2 


89 




250 


241 


92 


9 


96.0 


Allegany 


36 


34 


92 


3 


89 


5 


1 


1 


50 


.0 


50.0 


Anne Arundel 


36 


37 


100 





100 





31 


28 


93 


9 


100.0 




45 


49 


93 


8 


94 


2 


17 


15 


100 


.0 


100.0 


Calvert 


6 


6 


100 





100 





15 


13 


88 


2 


92.9 


Caroline 


8 


8 


88 


9 


88 


9 


3 


3 


75 


.0 


75.0 


Carroll 


16 


17 


88 


9 


94 


4 


4 


3 


100 





100.0 


Cecil 


15 


17 


71 


4 


77 


3 


3 


3 


75 





100.0 


Charles 


8 


8 


100 





100 





21 


22 


100 





100.0 


Dorchester 


19 


27 


70 


4 


100 





10 


12 


83 


3 


100.0 


Frederick 


22 


21 


71 





70 





4 


7 


50 





87.5 


Garrett 


24 


29 


51 


1 


64 


4 














20 


23 


71 


4 


79 


3 


8 


8 


80 





80!6 




9 


9 


90 





90 





8 


9 


100 





100.0 


Kent 


12 


12 


100 





100 





6 


6 


100 





100.0 


Montgomery 


46 


45 


100 





100 





20 


15 


100 





100.0 


Prince George's 


50 


53 


92 


6 


96 


4 


37 


37 


100 





100.0 




5 


14 


31 


3 


87 


5 


13 


13 


100 





100.0 


St. Mary's 


11 


11 


68 


8 


68 


8 


10 


8 


71 


4 


72.7 




12 


12 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 


Talbot 


11 


11 


100 





100 





9 


8 


100 





88.9 


Washington 


38 


39 


88 


4 


90 


7 


1 


1 


100 





100.0 


Wicomico 


16 


13 


100 





81 


3 


11 


11 


100 





100.0 


Worcester 


10 


10 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 



104 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 62 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties: 1941-1950 





White 


Colored 


Year 

Ending June 30 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 



1941 


232 


8.6 


719 


40.5 


74 


11 


9 


83 


47 


8 


1942 


190 


7.1 


670 


36.2 


66 


10 


9 


89 


46 


4 


1943 


139 


5.2 


538 


29.7 


58 


9 


7 


81 


42 





1944 


108 


4.0 


488 


27.3 


44 


7 


5 


72 


34 


8 


1945 


104 


3.7 


465 


25.8 


43 


7 


1 


78 


36 


8 


1946 


107 


3.9 


629 


29.4 


45 


7 


5 


88 


33 


7 


1947 


125 


4.5 


787 


33.8 


52 


8 


6 


103 


34 


4 


194* 


161 


5.4 


931 


36 7 


62 


10 


1 


126 


37 


2 


194° 


175 


5.5 


1,025 


38 3 


68 


10 


5 


140 


37 


3 


1950 


243 


7.1 


1,203 


41.1 


70 


10 


6 


154 


36 


6 



See TABLE X. 



TABLE 63 

Maryland Students Who Completed in June, 1948, at Colleges Indicated, the 
Requirements for Certification to Teach in Maryland Public Schools and the 
Number of Graduates Who Took Positions in Maryland County High Schools in 

the Fall of 1949* 





Number of Graduates 


College or University 


Who Met Requirements for 
Certification from 


Who Received 




Maryland 
Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Maryland County 
High School 
Positions* 


Western Maryland College 


61 


20 


45 


University of Maryland 


102 


37 


52 


Washington College 


23 
6 


7 


16 

8 


Hood College 


1 


Goucher College 




9 


1 


St. Joseph's College 


i 


2 


1 


Johns Hopkins University 


3 


5 


6 


College of Notre Dame 


1 


18 


7 









* According to reports from colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 64 — Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standard 
Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1947—1950* 



Type of Certificate 



1947 



White Colored 



1948 



White Colored 



1949 



1950 



White Colored fl White Colored 



Grand Total 

Nursery School and 
Kindergarten 

Elementary 

120 Semester hours 

Junior High (Core) 

High School 

Total High School 

Agriculture 

Art 

Commerce 

English 

Foreign Language (any) 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Library Science 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Education: 

Men 

Women 

Science: 

General Science .... 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Social Sciences 

Speech 



248 


117 


349 


168 


485 


159 


737 


208 














50 




65 


50 


92 


58 


94 


45 


126 


62 






1 




21 




101 




183 


67 


256 


110 


370 


114 


460 


146 


10 


1 


10 


4 


9 


1 


20 


4 


1 




7 




15 




12 




2 




2 




5 




9 




34 


io 


41 


i3 


62 


'20 


67 


ii 


12 


3 


22 


9 


33 


8 


13 


3 


19 


13 


23 


15 


9 


10 


24 


15 


5 


7 


9 


2 


16 


13 


28 


6 










1 








19 


5 


12 


' 8 


26 


' 8 


38 


■ '7 


9 


4 


9 


7 


14 


7 


17 


12 


15 


7 


20 


16 


39 


13 


79 


27 


10 


10 


15 


12 


23 


5 


21 


13 


4 


3 


19 


10 


8 


6 


27 


6 


5 




9 




15 


3 


10 


10 


5 




1 




6 


1 


8 








1 




5 




3 




32 


' '4 


55 


i4 


84 


19 


83 


26 


1 




1 








1 





* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first major). 



106 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 65— County Teachers in Service October, 1949, Who Attended Summer 
Schools and Evening Classes, Spring and Summer 1949 





Teachers in Service Oct. 1949 Who 
Attended in 1949 






















Number of 


County 




Number 


Per Cent 


School Attended 


Teachers 


Total 


















Num- 
ber 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 




Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White . . . 


1,315 


645 


670 


18 


9 


22 


8 


Allegany 


56 


22 


34 


8 


2 


12 


8 


Anne Arundel . . 


89 


38 


51 


15 


5 


24 


1 




298 


180 


118 


30 


2 


27 
33 


6 


Calvert 


15 


7 


8 


26 


9 


3 


Caroline 


11 


4 


7 


9 


3 


13 


5 


Carroll 


27 


16 


11 


13 


3 


8 


8 


Cecil 


44 


18 


26 


20 


5 


27 


7 


Charles 


18 


10 


8 


22 


2 


16 


3 


Dorchester .... 


30 


13 


17 


20 





27 


9 


Frederick 


62 


19 


43 


13 


1 


27 





Garrett 


42 


21 


21 


19 


6 


30 


9 


Harford 


66 


35 


31 


26 


1 


26 


5 


Howard 


23 


9 


14 


15 


5 


24 


1 


Kent 


13 


6 




17 


1 


21 


2 


Montgomery. . . 


196 


95 


101 


20 


8 


29 


s 


Prince George's 


151 


81 


70 


18 


9 


19 


4 


Queen Anne's. . 


12 


1 


11 


2 


7 


31 


4 


St. Mary's 


15 


6 


9 


14 


6 


30 





Somerset 


14 


6 


8 


15 





18 


6 


Talbot 


14 


8 


6 


20 





14 


3 


Washington . . . 


96 


42 


54 


16 


5 


22 


8 


Wicomico 


8 


2 


6 


2 


3 


10 


9 


Worcester 


15 


6 


9 


12 


8 


17 


6 



Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Columbia University 

Towson State Teachers College . . 
George Washington University. . . 

Western Maryland College 

University of Delaware 

West Virginia University 

Pennsylvania State College 

Shepherd State Teachers College . 

Temple University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Duke University 

Fairmont State Teachers College . 

Catholic University 

Boston University 

Wilson Teachers College 

Glenville State Teachers College . 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute . . . 
California, Penna. State Teachers 

College 

New York University 

One Hundred and Two Others . . . 



645 


670 


219 


256 


89 


42 


42 


60 


66 




30 


3i 


19 


29 


16 


18 


5 


29 


9 


19 


17 


9 


10 


10 


3 


13 


5 


10 


9 


4 


2 


11 


9 


2 


7 


1 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


1 


5 


77 


111 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored . . 


362 


212 


150 


32 


5 


35 


6 


Allegany 


1 


1 





20 








.0 


Anne Arundel . . 


36 


27 


9 


32 


9 


23 


.7 


Baltimore 


47 


30 


17 


43 


5 


44 


.7 


Calvert 


6 


5 


1 


17 


9 


6 


.7 


Caroline 


8 


3 


5 


20 





38 


5 


Carroll 


5 


1 


4 


12 


5 


57 


.1 


Cecil 


7 


2 


5 


22 


2 


50 





Charles 


19 


11 


8 


24 


4 


33 


3 


Dorchester .... 


19 


11 


8 


36 


7 


47 


1 


Frederick 


13 


8 


5 


47 


1 


38 


5 


Garrett 
















Harford 


13 


4 


9 


20 


6 


52 


9 


Howard 


11 


7 


4 


38 


9 


28 


6 


Kent 


14 


6 


8 


42 


9 


72 


7 


Montgomery. . . 


27 


19 


8 


45 


2 


28 


6 


Prince George's 


42 


21 


21 


20 


6 


35 





Queen Anne's. . 


7 


4 


3 


23 


5 


27 


3 


St. Mary's 


14 


9 


5 


42 


9 


38 


5 


Somerset 


15 


8 


7 


32 





33 


3 


Talbot 


15 


13 


2 


54 


2 


12 


5 


Washington . . . 


2 


1 


1 


20 





12 


5 


Wicomico 


13 


7 


6 


22 


6 


31 


6 


Worcester 


28 


14 


14 


53 


8 


63 


6 



Total 

Morgan State College 

New York University 

Hampton Institute 

Columbia University 

Temple University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Catholic University 

Howard University 

Virginia State College .... 
Pennsylvania State College 

Boston University 

Twenty-Eight Others 



212 


150 


90 


23 


18 


21 


30 


8 


10 


23 


12 


19 


7 


15 


11 


5 


8 


8 


4 


4 


1 


5 


2 


2 


19 


17 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 66 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1947-48, 1948-49, 1949-50 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1947-48 



1948-49 



1949-50 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 

Supervision of Special Subjects 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Advanced First Grade 

First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

War Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Non-Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Non-Degree 



1,459 



18 
269 
189 

40 
4 

54 



17 
295 
7 
21 
1 
14 



162 
101 



14 

137 



11 



20 
257 
196 
36 
22 
85 



19 

363 
6 



37 



167 
174 



18 
161 



18 



2,094 



20 
352 
268 
46 
69 
64 



24 
307 
5 
19 



13 



189 
360 



12 
193 



39 



108 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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lor's 
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Princ 


Master's 
Degree 


Total 


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a « 

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co^O 
c c c 



aS 

8-2 o 
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*5 



JO 



03 o. 2 

2. w P 

sfga 



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S3 S3 C S3 S3 
c3 <aJ ctf c3 



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rt 03 03 03 03 



QJCPCDCPCPCPCPCPCDCD 

-3 'S 'S -3 -3 'S T 



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DQ03 



WWMI0IO101OM 



gogogocOoogocogo a; cy q) a) a) a; cp cp 



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JMMM! 
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M bfi bO 

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bo b( 

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WW 



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GGWC 



c o y 
rtccirtcOrtcSaJCCfl 

■ cu cu <d 



> w o o 

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y cj y u u o 
fl S3 S3 C C S3 

4) CD CD a - cy 

'« 'o 'G 'G 'G "8 
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Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 74 

Number and Per Cent of Teachers New to Maryland County Schools: 1941-1950 



Year 



New to Counties 



Number 



Per Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 

of 
Teach- 
ing Posi- 
tions 
October 

to 
October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Experienced 







In 




From 




Sub- 


But 


Counties 


From 


Other 




stitutes 


New 


But Not 


An- 


Type 


Dtherf 




to 


Teaching 


other 


School 






State 


Preced- 


County* 


in Same 








ing Year 


County* 





WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1940-41 


205 


7.6 


-5 


127 


20 


29 


29 


19 


10 




1941-42 


355 


13.4 


-38 


142 


67 


63 


83 


31 


4 




1942-43 


565 


21.3 


+8 


272 




169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44 


521 


19.4 


+42 


165 


io 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944-45 


553 


20.1 


+67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46 


621 


22.7 


-52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


°50 


12 


47 


1946-47 


712 


25.3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


°57 


15 


41 


1947-48 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


x59 


20 


32 


1948-49 


646 


20.5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


J59 


26 


21 


1949-50 


692 


20.3 


+264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


z43 


26 


33 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1940-41 


262 


14.7 


+45 


173 


12 


44 


33 


20 


7 




1941-42 


421 


22.6 


+73 


233 


26 


111 


51 


25 


30 




1942-43 


587 


32.2 


-19 


270 




237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 


517 


28.7 


-55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


10 


1944-45 


525 


29.0 


+ 14 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46 


779 


37.0 


+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946-47 


763 


33.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


*57 


53 


28 


1947-48 


675 


26.7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


1/38 


43 


15 


1948-49 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


yo7 


22 


14 


1949-50 


722 


24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


°52 


42 


10 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1940-41 


41 


6 


5 


-14 


30 


2 


2 


7 


7 






1941-42 


59 


9 


8 


-24 


37 


8 


5 


9 


5 


i 




1942-43 


87 


14 


7 


-9 


65 




9 


13 


9 






1943-44 


120 


20 


3 


-6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




5 


1944-45 


132 


22 


3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46 


108 


18 


2 


-10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


i 


4 


1946-47 


104 


17 





+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


5 




1947-48 


71 


11 


7 


-5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 


1948-49 


97 


15 


1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


°9 


3 


3 


1949-50 


71 


10 


9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


3 


7 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1940-41 


42 


24 


1 


+ 12 


32 


2 


7 


1 


6 






1941-42 


38 


19 


9 


+ 11 


27 




7 


4 


3 


4 




1942-43 


65 


32 


8 


+5 


49 




10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44 


79 


37 


4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 


i 


1944-45 


90 


43 


1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46 


96 


37 





+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


°12 


ii 




1946-47 


104 


35 


3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


10 


i 


1947-48 


110 


32 


3 


+ 46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 




1948-49 


98 


26 





+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


4 


i 


1949-50 


102 


24 


2 


+44 


68 


1 


24 


9 


6 


5 


l 



* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per 
cent. . 

° One transfer from Baltimore City is included in the total number and per cent. 
X Three transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent, 
x Four transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
V Two transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 



116 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 75 



Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year, 1949-50 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 




Number New 


TO 


County Who 


Were 




Number 


Per Cent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State* 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


Experience 
u 

C++ 

el 

£° 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
Countyt 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Yearf 


Total State 


+912 


+18 


4 


+364 


394 


21 


320 




177 


53 




26 


33 


Baltimore City 




























Elementary and 




























Occupational . . 


234 


15 


1 


+100 


130 




53 




41 


10 








Total Counties. . . . 


J692 


J20 


3 


+264 


264 


21 


267 




136 


43 




26 


33 


Allegany 


33 


12 


3 


+ 6 


11 


4 


4 




10 


4 




2 


6 


Anne Arundel . . . 


73 


29 


8 


+31 


ZD 


1 


32 




10 


4 




3 


3 


Baltimore 


124 


20 


8 


+ 59 


60 


4 


33 




20 


°7 




2 


3 


Calvert 


8 


30 


8 


+ 1 


5 




1 




1 


1 










7 


16 


3 


+ 1 


1 




2 




4 










Carroll 


27 


22 


5 


+ 6 


15 


i 


5 




4 


2 




*2 




Cecil 


17 


19 


3 


+ 5 


8 


2 


4 




3 










Charles 


8 


17 


8 


+ 1 


3 




1 




2 


'2 






i 


Dorchester 


6 


9 


2 


+ 1 










3 


3 










24 


16 


5 


+ 7 


*7 




1 




7 


1 






2 


Garrett 


8 


7 


5 


- 2 


5 




1 




2 






3 


1 


Harford 


37 


27 


6 


+ 12 


22 




5 




8 


2 




1 






13 


22 


4 





5 




5 




2 


1 




1 


i 


Kent 


3 


8 


6 


+ 2 


3 














2 




Montgomery .... 


139 


30 


5 


+ 64 


26 




79 




19 


ooc 9 




2 


7 


Prince George's . 


128 


29 


9 


+57 


37 




70 




18 


3 




4 


3 


Queen Anne's . . . 


5 


13 


5 





1 




2 






1 






2 


St. Mary's 


10 


24 


4 


- 2 


6 




2 




2 










Somerset 


3 


7 


5 


+ 1 


1 








2 






i 




Talbot 


5 


12 


5 


+ 1 


2 




1 




2 










Washington 


33 


12 


9 


+ 7 


7 




12 




11 


2 




3 


3 
1 


Wicomico 


11 


12 


5 


+ 6 


9 








2 








Worcester 


9 


19 


1 





4 




i 




3 


i 









* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but trans- 
fers from Baltimore City to a county and vice versa are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are ex- 
cluded from total and percentage for total State. 

° One transfer from Baltimore City. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



TABLE 76 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior- Senior, Senior and Vocational High School 
Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School 

Year, 1949-50 



County 



New to County 



Number 



Per Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



o « c 



Total State 


J779 


J18.7 


+241 


464 


7 


223 


85 


55 


42 


10 


Baltimore City 
























36 


6.1 


- 9 


19 




7 


8 


2 








15 


2.8 


+ 5 


7 




6 




1 








10 


8.4 


+ 3 


7 




3 










Total Counties. . . . 


J722 


J24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


°52 


42 


10 


Allegany 


33 


12.4 


+ 6 


17 




11 


4 




1 


2 


Anne Arundel. . . 


66 


31.1 


+37 


30 




18 


14 


4 


8 




Baltimore 


144 


33.6 


+58 


98 




24 


10 


8 


19 




Calvert 


12 


50.0 


+ 3 


8 




2 


2 










9 


17.3 





6 




2 




i 






Carroll 


33 


26.4 


+ 3 


18 




7 


2 


5 


i 




Cecil 


18 


19.1 


+ 4 


8 




9 


1 








Charles 


12 


24.5 


+ 2 


6 




5 


1 








Dorchester 


10 


16.4 


+ 1 


6 




2 




°2 






Frederick 


44 


27.7 


+17 


29 




5 


5 


5 






n*rr»tt 


19 


27.9 


+ 5 


12 




6 


1 




2 






31 


26.5 


+ 4 


20 




3 


7 










20 


34 5 


- 1 


13 




4 


1 


2 






Kent 


6 


18.2 


— 1 


3 






1 


2 




*2 


Montgomery .... 


78 


23.0 


+27 


29 




33 


11 


4 


3 


4 


Prince George's . 


133 


36.8 


+ 60 


69 




48 


8 


8 


5 




Queen Anne's . . . 


11 


31.4 


+ 1 


8 




2 


1 








St. Mary's 


12 


40.0 


+ 2 


10 




2 










Somerset 


10 


23.3 


+ 1 


5 




3 




2 






Talbot 


10 


23.8 





5 




3 


i 


1 






Washington 


41 


17.3 


+ 11 


20 




13 


2 


5 


i 


i 


Wicomico 


11 


20.0 


+ 1 


5 




3 


2 


1 






Worcester 


10 


19.6 


+ 1 


6 




2 


2 




i 





If 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but trans- 
fers from Baltimore City to a county and vice versa are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are ex- 
cluded from total and percentage for total State. 

One transfer from Baltimore City. 



118 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 77 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools 
Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year, 1949-50 



of 



County 



New to County 



Number 



Per Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 



© 

55 



cfflh g 



if 

So 

— 



"3 w ojT 

« 8 * c 
Se^.So 



-3 oi a a; 



Total State 


fl63 


U0.4 


+78 


77 




27 


59 


tl6 


3 


7 


Baltimore City 






















Elementary and 






















Occupational. . 


fl04 


fll. 4 


+ 67 


39 




16 


37 


T12 






Total Counties .... 


m 


no. 9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


H 


3 


7 


Allegany 





0.0 



















Anne Arundel. . . 


6 


7.3 


- 1 


2 






3 










7 


10.1 


+ 3 


5 






1 








Calvert 


9 


32.1 





7 












1 


Caroline 


4 


26.7 





3 














Carroll 


1 


12.5 


+ 1 


1 














Cecil 





0.0 


+ 1 














i 


Charles 


7 


15.5 


+ 3 


3 






'2 








Dorchester 


2 


6.7 


- 1 


















1 


5.9 











i 








Garrett 






















Harford 


'6 


0.6 





















3 


16.7 


+ 2 


2 














Kent 





0.0 

















i 


Montgomery .... 


2 


4.8 











2 






l 


Prince George's . 


14 


13.7 


- 2 


8 






4 






2 


Queen Anne's . . . 


2 


11.8 


+ 1 








1 








St. Mary's 


3 


14.3 


— 1 


i 






2 








Somerset 


2 


8.0 





l 






1 








Talbot 


4 


16.7 


+ 2 








2 








Washington 





0.0 





















2 


6.5 





2 














Worcester 


6 


23.1 


+ 3 


3 






3 




i 


i 



* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers between counties and Baltimore City and vice versa are excluded from total and percentage for the 
State as a whole, but transfers from the counties to Baltimore City are included in totals and percentage for Balti- 
more City. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE 78 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High 
School Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the 

School Year, 1949-50 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 










Change 
in 






Experienced 


County 


Num'oT 


Per Cent 


Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


In- 

enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 
Countyt 


Fr^m Other 
Type of 
School in 
Same Countyf 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Re- 
turned Dur- 
ing Year* 


Total State 


fl46 

26 
6 
12 


tl7 

10 
6 
17 


6 


+81 

+ 13 
+ 8 
+ 16 

+ 44 


90 


1 


35 


20 


6 




5 


1 


Baltimore City 

Junior High 

Senior High 


9 
1 
4 


13 
1 

8 




8 
2 
1 


5 
3 
3 










Total Counties. . . . 


tl02 


|24 


2 


68 


1 


24 


9 


6 




5 


1 


Allegany 






























Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore 


6 
11 


15 

28 


8 
9 


+ 2 
+ 4 


3 
6 




2 
2 


i 


i 

1 




i 




Calvert 


4 


26 


7 


+ 1 


2 




2 














3 


23 


1 


+ 4 


3 
















Carroll 


3 


42 


9 





3 
















Cecil 


3 


30 








2 




i 












Charles 


6 


25 





+ 3 


4 




1 


i 












3 


17 


6 


+ 1 


2 






l 










Frederick 


4 


30 


8 


+ 2 


4 










































2 


11 


8 


+ '2 


1 




i 














9 


64 


3 


+ 4 


5 




3 




i 








Kent 


2 


18 


2 











i 


l 




i 




Montgomery .... 
Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 
St. Mary's 


6 
20 
3 
3 


21 
66 
27 
23 


8 
7 
3 
1 
6 


+ 2 
+ 10 
+ 1 
+ 2 


4 

9 
3 
2 




i 

7 


l 

3 


i 
i 




i 






6 


28 
6 


+ 1 


6 












i 




Talbot 


1 


3 





1 
















Washington 

Wicomico 


3 
2 


37 
10 
36 


5 
5 




+ 1 


2 




3 












Worcester 


8 


4 


+ 4 


6 




i 


i 






i 



























* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for total counties and total State. 



120 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 79 



Source of Teachers New to the Counties of Maryland: 1949-1930 





Total 


Experienced 


Inexperienced 


County 




Recruited from 


Recruited from 


Recruited from 




Total 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- 
land 


Other 
States 


Mary- Other 
land States 



WHITE TEACHERS 



All Counties 


*1,442 


681 


761 


303 


479 


378 


989 


Allegany 




37 


24 


19 


15 


18 


9 


Anne Arundel 


137 


65 


72 


32 


50 


33 


22 




252 


155 


97 


43 


58 


112 

9 


39 


Calvert 


21 


14 


7 


5 


3 


4 




17 


9 


8 


6 


4 


3 


4 


Carroll 


56 


37 


19 


13 


12 


24 


7 


Cecil 


32 


10 


22 


4 


13 


6 


9 


Charles 


20 


6 


14 


5 


6 


1 


8 


Dorchester 


16 


8 


8 


7 


3 


1 


5 


Frederick 


65 


44 


21 


18 


12 


26 


9 


Garrett 


26 


6 


20 


3 


7 


3 


13 


Harford 


68 


40 


28 


18 


8 


22 


20 


Howard 


33 


10 


23 


6 


9 


4 


14 


Kent 


9 


8 


1 


3 




5 


1 


Montgomery 


200 


65 


135 


40 


lis 


25 


20 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


258 


85 


173 


37 


118 


48 


55 


16 


5 


11 


3 


4 


2 


7 


St. Mary's 


21 


6 


15 


2 


4 


4 


11 


Somerset 


12 


8 


4 


4 




4 


1 


Talbot 


14 


5 


9 


4 


4 


1 


5 


Washington 


70 


36 


34 


20 


25 


16 


9 


Wicomico 


19 


11 


8 


5 


3 


6 


5 




19 


11 


8 


6 


3 


5 


5 



COLORED TEACHERS 



All Counties 


tl74 


98 


76 


41 


36 


57 


40 


Allegany 
















Anne Arundel 


12 


6 


6 


4 


3 


2 


3 


Baltimore 


16 


13 


3 


3 


3 


10 




Calvert 


13 


5 


8 




4 


5 




Caroline 


6 


2 


4 




1 


2 


3 


Carroll 


4 


3 


1 






3 


1 




2 




2 




i 




1 




13 


8 


5 


i 


2 


4 


3 


Dorchester 


5 


2 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 




5 


4 


1 


1 




3 


1 


Garrett 


















2 




2 




i 




i 




13 


6 


7 


i 


5 


'5 


2 


Kent 


2 


2 




2 








Montgomery 


7 


5 


2 


3 


i 


2 


i 


Prince George's 


33 


14 


19 


8 


9 


6 


10 


Queen Anne's 


4 


2 


2 


2 






2 


St. Mary's 


5 


4 


1 


3 




i 






7 


5 


2 


1 




4 


2 




5 


5 




4 








Washington 


3 




3 




3 






Wicomico 


3 


2 


1 






2 


i 


Worcester 


14 


10 


4 


'4 


i 


6 


3 



* Excludes 62 teachers for whom no information was available. Includes 95 teachers who transferred 
between counties, or Baltimore City and counties. 

t Excludes 9 teachers for whom no information was available. Includes 10 teachers who transferred 
between counties. 

Note: The "permanent home address," as listed on the teacher's application blank has been used as 
the factor determining the "source." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



TABLE 80 — Average Number Belonging per Maryland Teacher and Principal for 

Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 


Average Number Belonging 


Per Teacher and Principal 


White 


White Elementary Schools* 


Colored 


Schools 




High 


















Schools 


All Ele- 


One- 


Two- 


Three- 






Ele- 






mentary 


teacher 


teacher 


teacher 


Graded 


High 


mentary* 



State Average 


21 


4 


33 


3 














33 


7 


23 


5 


33 


3 


Baltimore City 


20 


4 


31 


9 














31 


9 


24 


5 


32 





County Average 


21 


9 


34 





22 


5 


27 


5 


31 


6 


34 


6 


22 


5 


35 


1 


Allegany 


24 


5 


31 


9 






23 


8 


28 


9 


32 


2 


16 


3 


30 


6 


Anne Arundel 


21 


7 


35 


8 






25 


4 


36 


5 


35 


9 


29 


2 


36 


6 


Baltimore 


25 


3 


35 


9 






t33 


8 






35 


9 


24 


5 


39 


9 


Calvert 


18 


8 


31 


3 






tl7 


1 


t28 


8 


33 





24 


1 


35 


8 


Caroline 


18 


3 


35 


5 






28 


8 




36 


4 


20 


7 


37 





Carroll 


19 


7 


34 


3 






23 


3 






34 


6 


18 


3 


34 


1 


Cecil 


19 


1 


34 


1 


33 


9 


28 









34 


8 


16 





33 





Charles 


18 


8 


34 


6 














34 


6 


20 


4 


34 


1 




18 


5 


29 


2 


H 


2 


29 


i 


t35 
33 


i 


33 


1 


20 


6 


34 


1 


Frederick 


21 


6 


36 


8 


T21 


3 


26 


5 


8 


37 


9 


22 


3 


36 


7 


Garrett 


19 


4 


31 


2 


20 


4 


33 


4 


30 




35 













Harford 


19 


5 


35 





29 


7 


28 


3 


T40 


3 


35 


7 


2i 


2 


33 


6 


Howard 


18 


4 


33 


3 


t25 





T24 


7 




33 


8 


21 


6 


31 


4 


Kent 


17 


8 


27 


9 




21 


5 


t30 


4 


30 


4 


24 


8 


33 


4 


Montgomery 


20 


6 


34 





t2i 


3 


28 


9 


29 





34 


1 


21 


3 


37 


9 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


23 


5 


35 





tl7 





33 


3 


t32 


1 


35 





23 


4 


32 


4 


19 


2 


31 


3 


20 


3 


26 


1 


28 


1 


34 


3 


20 


9 


28 


7 


St. Mary's 


20 


1 


26 


4 


27 


7 


24 


8 


t27 


9 


27 


1 


18 


6 


31 


7 


Somerset 


18 


2 


34 


1 


27 




22 






36 


1 


22 


7 


38 


4 


Talbot 


19 


9 


32 


6 


T20 


4 


24 


5 


t26 




34 


3 


21 


4 


30 


6 


Washington 


22 


6 


30 


6 


27 


9 


28 


6 


29 


9 


30 


8 


15 


8 


35 


7 


Wicomico 


23 


1 


36 


5 






29 


6 


32 


1 


37 


3 


23 


4 


37 


1 


Worcester 


17 


1 


32 


9 






24 





31 


9 


34 


3 


22 


2 


35 


5 



* Excludes pupils going to elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t One school only. 

For basic data by county see TABLES VI and X. 



122 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 81 

Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Maryland County Teacher and Principal 

1941-1950 



Year Ending 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 



White 



Colored 





Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1941 


35.8 


24.1 


35.8 


27.2 


1942 


36 


23.3 


36.3 


25.5 


1943 


36.8 


23.0 


36.3 


25.4 


1944 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 


1945 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 


1946 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 


1947 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1948 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 


1949 


34.0 


21.6 


34.7 


22.7 


1950 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 



Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 82 



Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1950 



Year Ending 


White 


Colored 


June 30 












Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$990 


$1,436 


$513 


$906 


1928 


1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1933 


1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1938 


1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1940 


1,360 


1,605 


906 . 


1,018 


1941 


1,387 


1,618 


993 


1,103 


1942 


1,427 


1,639 


1,124 


1,290 


1943 


1,539 


1,735 


1,291 


1,450 


1944 


1,805 


1,997 


1,551 


1,705 


1945 


1,862 


2,042 


1,599 


1,719 


1946 


2,027 


2,183 


1,737 


1,845 


1947 


2,306 


2,439 


2,002 


2,100 


1948 


3,234 


3,446 


3,157 


3,178 


1949 


3,236 


3,318 


2,916 


2,885 


1950 


3,342 


3,344 


3,023 


2,888 



Maryland State Department of Education 



All Colored Schools 


1 




— 10 OOt^OO OOCOOO 

s s 2 slfesl issss 

* ID ■* ^iOiC«"* -«f «* <M ■<*< -*< 


oggo 00*00 gg£ 

2828 82SS8 2gS 

■>»<■*' CO COCOCOCO'!^^ lO-*J<CO 




3 s S= SJ28SS sssss 


{2§8§ ^^g^g &??3 
S££2~ 




g § s§ £g£Sg S8£oS 


£^ss nisi g|S 


| 

1 




g S E2 ~S88S ~SSS~ 

■>*< to CO CO CO CO CO (M CO 


pis lips pi 

COCO-* COCO COCO COCM 


■ 

.«■ 


- g co »»2 S «2: S^ocojo 

s s s. ssRgfe sssag 


3,196! 
2,689 
3 236 
3 330 

2,816 
3,167 
2,610 
2,572 
2,715 

3,318 
2,835 
2,611 


J-il 


« g co SS2S2 

3 8 8 SSS^Sg 


PP. PIP PI 


1 

Eh 


Prin- 
cipalf 


£. 00 ^ ONCjJOOO 00,0*0 

8 3 8 SS^gg. S.mS. 


pp. imp. m 




;o g g. ca;-c,« t-o^t.co 

55 S 88 SSSSfeS S&SftSS 


pit pip. pi 


HI 


1 i 1 gJMI 


p.p. IjfMi. IP. 


All White Schools 


1 


Prin- 
cipalf 


2 S3 S §££82 8S3KS SS8£S Son 
- S S 88823 S88SS SoSSoS ^Sco 


h 


§ S S oSSSSS sssss g££ 

§ w § SSSccg SSSSS ~cq«o>o» 


reach- 

er : 
Prin- 
cipal 


2 £ 5 §££3S SSSSSS ssskg sks 
» 5 S J5S3388 8.3533.3 SSSSS S8.S8.8. SS^ 


1 


il 


2 £ 8 ££8E8 ^8S5S3 ££§855 SK8 
oc S col SSSfeS £83.83 *«g2S SS«S38. SK8. 


U 


g S S KSSSS J5o"8£!5 ^SS§ SSSSSS 

« £ 8 coS?S8£ S§S2oS 8.28.88. 8§88.5=. £88 


Teach- 
er 
Prin- 
cipal 


£33 32£38 g^Kcoo g££SS %£3 
3 « « SS5oS8 S.SS38 8.S3.3S SSSSSg SS2 


1 

H 


Prin- 
cipal 


2 8 3 s^gSS? 8S££3 3°.35£ £82 

s g s 33.398$ ShSss.s s.s&qs ff.fc.sas ssq 


h 


S co g SS^S- 283°.£ 288 ' 
2 § § SSSgg 88*882 &2S^S -Sj^S8 EJ2.8 


Mi 


I S I IS31S iljll Pill SsiSs i|I 


3 

l! 
I 


il 


1 1 E llSii iSIEi ISliS iMII HI 


1. 


1 s l pill ipsi iipi IMP. §M 


reach- 

er 1 
Prin- 
cipal 


1 1 § IMP. illM PMI =111.1 m 


4j 


3 
1 


il 


s 1 1 mm mm mm mm m 


i. 


? g 1 SIMS SMI! PIP. PM.t. Ill 


^each- 

er 
Prin- 
cipal 


1 1 1 ipij. iMii ii.P.i piii m 


All 
Schools 


Prin- 
cipal! 


i 1 1 ipii ssiie piii iiiji lis 




1 1 1 mm ipii pip. UMi in 


Mi 


i 1 1 PMS illis ppg Pill IP 


p 

O 


Total State ! 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick . 


Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



124 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 84 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools* 

1941-1950 







County Elementary School Teachers 








White 






Colored 




Year 


























Ending 
June 30 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 
















Number 


Per Cent 




Number 


Per Cent 


1941 


2,921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 85— Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties: Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Schools for 


White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 




Teachers in One- 


Pupils 


in One- 


Teachers in One- 


Pupils 


in One- 


County 


Teacher Schools 


Teacher Schools 


Teacher 


Schools 


Teacher Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total and Average 


64 


1 


9 


1,439 


1 


2 


63 


9 


6 


1,785 


7.8 


Allegany 














1 


20 





33 


21.0 


Anne Arundel 














2 


2 


4 


68 


2.3 


Baltimore 














1 


1 


5 


38 


1.4 


Calvert 














5 


17 


9 


160 


16.0 


Caroline 
























Carroll 














i 


12 


5 


Yl 


6^2 


Cecil 


4 


4 


4 


136 


4 


4 












Charles 














6 


13 


6 


23 i 


14^8 


Dorchester 


13 


20 


6 


224 


11 


8 


6 


19 


4 


158 


15.1 


Frederick 


1 





7 


21 





4 


3 


17 


6 


91 


14.6 


Garrett 


24 


22 


4 


489 


14 


7 












Harford 


5 


3 


6 


149 


3 


1 


'4 


20 


6 


ioi 


15.3 






1 


7 


25 


1 


2 


2 


11 


1 


65 


11.5 


Kent 














3 


21 


4 


90 


19.3 


Montgomery 


i 





2 


2i 





i 


1 


2 


4 


38 


2 3 


Prince George's 


1 





2 


17 





1 


8 


7 


8 


210 


6.3 




3 


8 


1 


61 


5 


3 


10 


58 


8 


269 


55.0 


St. Mary's 


4 


9 


8 


111 


10 


2 


6 


27 


3 


132 


19.2 


Somerset 


3 


7 


5 


81 


6 















Talbot 


1 


2 


5 


20 


1 


6 












Washington 


3 


1 


2 


84 


1 


1 












Wicomico 














4 


12 


9 


84 


7.3 


Worcester 

























* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 86 — Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City, 
Number of Teachers and Principals : Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Number 




>> 

5 




1 




























rge's | 


T. 














OF 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 


All Schools 


Baltimore ( 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


s 

A 

u 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgome 


Prince Geo 


Queen Ann 


St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washingtoi 


Wicomico 


| Worcester 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


a574 


75 


34 


30 


44 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


25 


28 


44 


27 


9 


10 


38 


44 


13 


14 


10 


9 


38 


15 


10 


1.0- 1.4 


83 




*°3 


*1 






*1 


*°3 


4 




13 


*2 


24 


*6 


1 


°2 


*2 


*t3 


°5 


4 


3 


*2 


3 




*1 


1.5- 2.4 


75 




3 


1 


t2 


i 


2 




to 




7 


4 


9 


5 


1 


4 


2 


u 


n 


7 


2 


1 


8 


3 


2 


2.5- 3.4 


31 




2 


4 


1 






1 




1 


3 


2 


1 




1 


2 


1 


2 


1 




1 


4 


2 


2 


3.5- 4.4 


50 




1 


2 


5 


2 


i 


i 


2 


1 




6 


4 


1 


i 


1 


4 


2 


2 




'i 


3 


6 


2 


1 


4.5- 5.4 


31 


3 


2 




3 


1 




l 


1 


3 




3 


1 


2 


l 




1 


1 


1 




i 


1 


2 


2 


1 


5.5- 6.4 


32 




4 


4 


1 




3 


3 


2 




i 


3 


1 


3 








4 












1 


1 


6.5- 7.4 


32 




5 


4 


4 




1 


3 




i 


l 


2 




2 


3 




1 


1 






i 




i 


1 




7.5- 8.4 


22 




2 


3 


5 






1 








1 




1 




1 




3 






l 




2 




i 


8.5- 9.4 


25 


i 


3 


2 


1 






1 


1 








2 


3 






2 


4 






l 




3 






9.5-10.4 


17 


3 






1 




"i 


2 


1 




2 






1 


i 






4 












i 




10.5-11.4 . . . 


16 


4 




"i 


2 














i 








i 


i 


2 










i 


i 




11.5-12.4. . . . 


20 


7 


2 


2 


1 














1 










3 












1 


2 




12.5-13.4 


21 


7 


1 


1 


3 
























3 


2 










3 






13.5-14.4 


14 


1 


1 


2 










li .. 




1 


1 








2 


3 










1 






14.5-15.4 


15 


4 


1 


1 


2 








1 






1 










3 


2 
















15.5-16.4 


8 


3 


1 






























2 








i 








16.5-17.4 


9 


4 






1 
























3 


















17.5-18.4 


11 


7 






























4 


















18.5-19.4 . . . 


7 


2 






1 
























1 


3 
















19.5-20.4. . . . 


12 


3 




2 


4 
























1 


1 










i 






20.5 or more. . 


43 


24 


2 




8 . . 




1 




1 








1 






2 


2 










2 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


a284 


47 


2 


27 


14 


13 


4 


3 


3 


19 


11 


8 




10 


9 


6 


14 


34 


12 


11 


8 


9 


1 


n 


8 


1.0- 1 


4 


67 


tl 


1 


*3 


1 


5 




1 




6 


*7 


3 




4 


t3 


3 


1 


8 


10 


6 








4 




1.5- 2 


4 


95 


4 




15 


6 


4 




1 


i 


7 


1 


4 




4 


4 


1 


t8 


14 




3 


5 


t6 




3 


4 


2.5- 3 


4 


33 


1 




4 


1 


1 






l 


4 


1 






1 


1 


1 


3 


6 


i 


1 






3 


1 


3.5- 4 


4 


16 




i 






3 


i 




i 












1 






3 


1 




2 


1 






2 


4.5- 5 


4 


9 


i 




i 






1 


i 












1 






i 


1 








1 


"i 






5.5- 6 


4 


8 


2 




l 


i 












1 


1 








i 




1 
















6.5- 7 


4 


7 






2 












2 




















1 


1 








1 


7.5- 8 


4 


3 








3 










































8.5- 9 


4 


3 


1 






1 


































1 








9.5-10 


4 


2 


1 






























i 


















10.5-11 


4 


2 


2 
















































11 . 5-12 


4 


2 


1 












































1 




12.5-13 


4 


6 


5 


















1 






























13.5-14 


4. . . . 


4 


3 




1 












































14.5-15 


4 


1 


1 
















































15.5-16 


4 


1 


1 
















































17.5-18 


4 


4 


3 






1 










































20 . 5 or more . . 


21 


20 
































1 

















a Includes a total of eleven seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum; white — one in Allegany and eight in Baltimore; colored — one each in Anne Arundel and Baltimore. 
* Includes one school having a two-teacher organization. 
° Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization, 
t Includes one school having a graded organization. 



126 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Refort 



TABLE 87— Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City, 
Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1950 







>> 

3 




V 


























>. 


rge's 


"<v 








c 






Average 
Number 


ools 


o 


>» 


d 

5 


o 












ster 


Frederick 










0) 

£ 

<-> 


Geo 


Ann 


ry's 


Somerset 




o 

M 


o 
u 


u 

-2 


Belonging 


All Sch 


Baltirm 


Allegan 


Anne A 


Baltim' 


Calvert 


Carolin 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorche 


Garret! 


Harfon 


Howan 


Kent 


Montgi 


Prince 


Queen 


St. Ma 


Talbot 


Washin 


Wicom 


Worces 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


574 


75 


34 


30 


44 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


25 


28 


44 


27 


9 


10 


38 


44 


13 


14 


10 


9 


38 


15 


10 


Less than 26 


58 




3 


1 






1 


3 






12 


1 


17 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 




1 


26- 50 . . . 


49 




1 






i 






5 




3 


3 


9 


5 


1 


3 




1 


4 


6 


2 




4 




1 


51- 100 


73 


i 


4 


2 


2 


1 


*2 




4 




5 


4 


9 


4 




2 


4 


5 


2 


4 


1 


2 


9 


' 4 


2 


101- 150 ; '. 


47 


2 


1 


5 


3 


2 




i 


3 


i 


1 


2 


3 


1 


i 


1 


4 


1 


1 






3 


6 


3 


2 


151- 200. . . . 


52 


3 


4 


1 


5 


1 


i 


i 


1 


3 


1 


7 


2 


4 


i 




1 


5 


2 




2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


201- 250 .... 


44 


1 


6 


3 


2 




3 


5 


2 






4 


1 


2 


3 


i 


1 


2 




i 


1 




3 


3 




251- 300 


44 


4 


5 


7 


7 


i 


1 


2 


1 


' i 


i 


3 




3 






1 


2 






1 




3 




i 


301- 350 .... 


30 


1 


2 


2 


2 






1 


1 




l 




2 


4 


i 


i 


1 


6 


1 


i 


1 




2 






351- 400 


29 


11 


1 


1 


3 




i 


2 






l 














5 










2 


i 




Af\1 AKC\ 




O 


q 




1 
























o 












I 


i 




451- 500 ... . 


25 


5 


1 


4 


2 








1 
















5 


3 










1 


2 


'i 


501- 550 


18 


9 






2 .. 






1 






1 


1 








2 


2 
















551- 600 


22 


5 


i 




2 














1 




1 


l 




5 


4 










1 






601- 650 


11 


5 
















l 














3 


1 










1 






651- 700 


8 








4 
























1 


2 










1 






701- 750 


7 


1 


2 


2 




























1 
















751- 800 


9 


6 






2 
























1 


















801- 850 ... . 


6 


3 






1 
























1 


1 
















851- 900 


4 


3 






1 










































901- 950 


3 


3 
















































951-1000 


4 


3 






























1 


















1101-1150 


2 


1 






1 










































1151-1200 


2 








2 










































1251-1300 


1 


1 
















































1401-1450 


1 


1 
















































1451-1500 


1 


1 
















































1501-1550 


1 








1 










































1701-1750 


1 








1 











































ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools . . . 


284 


47 


2 


27 


14 


13 


4 


3 


3 


19 


11 


8 




10 


9 


6 


14 


34 


12 


11 


8 


9 


1 


n 


8 


Less than 26 . . 


32 






1 




1 




1 




1 


5 


1 




3 








4 


4 


5 




3 




3 




26- 50 


50 


2 


i 


2 


*i 


4 








5 


2 


2 




2 


3 


3 


1 


7 


6 


4 


i 


3 




1 




51- 100 


91 


3 




16 


5 


4 




1 


1 


11 


1 


4 




4 


4 


2 


7 


15 


1 




4 






4 


4 


101- 150 


33 


2 




3 


2 


1 


3 




2 




1 








2 




4 


5 


1 






i 




2 


2 


151- 200 


16 


2 




1 


1 


3 


1 


i 












1 








1 






2 


1 


i 




1 


201- 250. . . . 


9 


2 




1 


1 












1 










1 


1 


1 














1 


251- 300 


9 






2 


2 










2 




1 
















1 


1 










801- 350 


7 


5 








































1 




1 




351- 400 ... . 


5 


4 






























1 


















401- 450. .. . 


4 


3 






1 










































451- 500 


2 






i 














1 






























501- 550. .. . 


2 


2 
















































551- 600 


1 


1 
















































601- 650. .. . 


4 


4 
















































651- 700 


1 


















































701- 750 


4 


4 
















































801- 850. .. . 


2 


2 
















































901- 950. . . 


2 


1 
































1 
















951-1000 


3 


3 
















































1001-1050 . . . 


1 


1 
















































1051-1100 


1 


1 
















































1101-1150 


2 


2 
















































1201-1250 


1 


1 
















































1251-1300. . . . 


1 


1 
















































1401-1450 


1 


1 

















































Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



TABLE 88 — Number of Maryland White Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers: 

Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Number 
of 

Teachers 


All Schools 


Baltimore City 


>» 

c 

cS 

be 
— 
< 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 


— > 

S 
_> 

"3 
O 


■ 
s 

~ 

u 
CS 

O 


: 
u 
E 
ea 
O 


'3 

0) 

U 


-= 

W 


1 

an 
- 
- 
- 

Q 


.* 

r 
— 

i. 
fa 


Z 

a 

"J 


-o 
& 

S3 

S 


T3 

33 

o 

=: 


c 


1 

o 
— 
= 

o 


OS 

t 

h 
O 
- 

O 

S 
£ 


0B 

"sj 
c 

B 
< 

a 

3 

a 


30 

V. 


I 

= 

o 
aj 


Q 
Si 

a 
— 


c 

5 

^: 
c 

a 

a 


Wicomico 


— 

00 

0J 

«j 
u 

o 


Grand Total. . 


181 


27 


10 


9 


14 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 




8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


11 


14 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 


JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 


Total 


134 

1 

3 
2 
3 
5 
6 
6 
3 
9 
3 
5 

10 
7 
2 
6 
6 
3 
4 

50 


14 


8 


4 


8 


1 


5 


8 


7 


2 


6 

1 
1 


6 


5 


8 


4 


4 




10 


3 


2 


4 


3 7 


4 4 


2 










3 




























1 
















1 




4 
























1 










1 






5 












1 


























1 




1 
1 




6 


















2 










1 
1 










1 


7 












1 




2 
1 
1 


1 






1 












8 


1 


1 












1 
1 
1 






1 












1 


9 
















1 






















10 


i 


2 


1 








3 


2 
























11 
















1 
1 






















12 












1 
1 
1 
1 






1 


1 


i 


i 


















1 


13 


l 
l 










2 
1 




2 






1 




1 






14 




1 


i 




1 








1 




1 


15 




























16 








1 














1 


i 


2 


1 


"i 


2 








1 


17 


























1 
1 




1 
1 




18 






















1 
1 

2 


i 


2 
1 


19 




















1 
















20 and over . 


10 


5 


2 


7 


1 




1 


1 


1 






4 


8 








1 


4 


1 




JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 


Total 


♦47 

1 

5 
4 
1 

2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

23 


13 


2 


5 


6 






1 


1 


4 


1 


2 










4 


4 






i 

1 




. 






1 










3 








3 










1 

2 
























1 






4 












1 


1 


























5 


i 


1 








































6 


















1 




























8 






1 








































9 
















1 
















1 
















10 




1 










































11 


1 












































13 














1 






























14 






























1 


1 
















15 


i 
l 

10 




1 








































16 












































17 
















































20 and over. 




3 


2 














1 










3 


2 










2 







* Excludes a total of nine seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum; one in Allegany and eight in Baltimore. 

For teaching staff in individual high schools, see TABLE XXIL 



128 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE 89 — Number of Maryland White Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
and White Junior High Schools by County and Baltimore City — Average Number 
Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1950 









































as 


















5 




jS 
'O 


























b 


L- 


*0> 














Average 
Number 
Belonging 


Schools 


0> 

c 

s 


>> 
c 
cs 
to 


c 

3 
U 
< 

® 

c 


s 

I 


IB 
> 


roline 


rroU 


1 


S 

u 


rchestor 


>derick 


-u 

2 
h. 


rford 


ward 


c 


•ntgome 


nce Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


1 
i 


tbot 


ishingtoi 


comico 


•rcester 




< 


13 
A 


< 


c 

< 


It 
H 


3 

u 


CS 

o 


o 


U 


x; 
O 


o 
Q 


fa 


o 


= 


o 
K 








& 


w 


o 
t: 


a 
H 








Grand Total . . 


*190 


27 


*11 


9 


*22 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


11 


14 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 



JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



Total 




134 


14 


g 


4 


8 


1 


5 


g 


7 


2 


6 


6 


5 


8 


4 


4 


7 


10 


3 


2 


4 


3 


7 


4 


4 


25 or less . . 


1 




















1 






























26- 


50 
































1 




















51- 


100 


12 












1 






1 


3 






1 




1 










2 


1 




2 




101- 


150 


12 


1 










1 




3 






i 


i 


1 




1 






1 










1 


' i 


151- 


200 


18 


3 


2 


1 








3 


1 




i 




2 


2 


"i 




"i 
















l 


201- 


250 


13 




1 








2 


2 








i 




1 


l 




l 




1 


1 




1 






l 


251- 


300 


9 






1 


1 




1 


2 


1 








i 




l 












i 










301- 


350 


8 
















1 














1 


l 


1 


1 




l 




1 




i 


351- 


400 


10 


















1 


l 


l 




2 


l 






1 




i 






2 






401- 


450 


4 










1 












2 






















1 






451- 


500 


5 


2 






























l 


2 
















501- 


550 


4 




1 




1 








1 


























1 








551- 


600 


3 


i 


1 




















l 


























601- 


650 


3 
































l 


1 










1 






651- 


700 


1 


























1 
























701- 


750 


2 


































1 










1 






751- 


800 


2 








1 


























1 
















801- 


850 


3 






1 


1 






1 




































851- 


900 


1 


































1 
















901- 


950. .. . 


2 




1 


1 












































1001- 


1050 


4 
































l 


2 












1 




1051- 


1100 


2 








1 














1 




























1101- 


1150 


1 
































l 


















1151- 


1200 


2 


1 










































1 






1401- 


1450 


3 




1 




2 










































1451- 


1500 


1 








1 










































1501- 


1550 


1 


1 
















































1751- 


1800 


1 


1 
















































1801- 


1850 


2 


1 


1 














































1901 and over 


3 


3 

















































JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 



*56 
3 
4 
12 
1 
3 
4 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 

3 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

2 



13 



1901 and over 



*14 
2 
3 
5 
1 
1 



* Includes a total of nine seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high 
school curriculum; one in Allegany and eight in Baltimore County. 

For average number belonging in individual county high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 90 — Number of Maryland Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High 
Schools by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers ; and by County and Baltimore 
City — Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Number 
of 

Teachers 

Average 
Number 
Belonging 



Grand Total f44 811311113 11.. 2111 



12 2 11 13 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY NUMBER OF TEACHERS 



3 


**2 
**3 
*1 
*3 
2 
3 
3 
*2 
3 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

1 

*** 
11 


































**2 
















4 


















*1 


















1 










*1 
*1 


5 












































6 








1 






1 




















*1 














7 




























1 






8 
















1 








1 














1 




9 








1 


























1 










10 














1 
















*1 














11 


1 


























1 




1 














12 
















1 
























13 












1 








1 


















1 










14 
























1 


















1 


15 










1 




































16 








































1 








17 


































1 














19 










































1 




20 and over 


■*** 
7 




1 


1 
























1 


1 













NUMBER OF SCHOOLS BY AVERAGE NUMBER BELONGING 



51- 


100 


101- 


150 


151- 


200 


201- 


250 


251- 


300 


301- 


350 


351- 


400 


401- 


450 


451- 


500 


501- 


550 


551- 


600 


601- 


650 


951- 


1000 


1101- 


1150 



2001 and over 



***4 
***8 
5 
1 
*7 
5 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
*1 

*1 

1 

*3 



*3 



*2 



** 2 
*1 



t Excludes two seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school 
curriculum: one each in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties. 
* Each asterisk represents one junior high school. 

For teaching staff and average number belonging in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII- 



130 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 91 



Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subject: Adult Education Classes: 
Counties of Maryland:" 1949-50 



County 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total Counties 


417* 


15,481 


910 


3,617 


1,770 


2,196 


6,988 


WHITE ADULTS 




370* 


14,402 


880 


3,208 


1,720 


2,050 


6,544 


Allegany 


59 


2,663 


624 


1,196 


238 


262 


343 


Anne Arundel .... 


15 


529 


38 


115 


143 


19 


214 


Baltimore 


96 


2,928 




291 


398 


343 


1,896 


Calvert 


















"i 


23 










23 


Carroll 


13 


380 




ii2 


25 


69 


174 


Cecil 


2 


104 








104 




Charles 


1 


19 










19 


Dorchester 


10 


201 


25 






37 


139 


Frederick 


4 


288 




i39 






149 


Garrett 


















'48 


1,427 




202 




475 


750 


Howard 


10 


217 


*39 


40 




64 


74 


Kent 


5 


186 




13 




32 


141 




49 


3,428 


133 


781 


495 


275 


1,744 


Prince George's. . . 


17 


672 




121 




294 


257 


Queen Anne's .... 


2 


40 










40 


St. Mary's 


3 


183 






si 




152 


Somerset 
















Talbot 


' e 


i45 


21 


21 




26 


'77 


Washington 


23 


693 




121 


390 




182 


Wicomico 


7 


190 




31 




50 


109 


Worcester 


4 


86 




25 






61 



COLORED ADULTS 



All Counties 


49* 


1,079 


30 


409 


50 


146 


444 




1 


19 




19 








Anne Arundel .... 


9 


212 




78 


21 


28 


'85 


Baltimore 


13 


213 




83 


17 


35 


78 


Calvert 
















Caroline 
















Carroll 
















Cecil 


"i 


22 










22 


Charles 


2 


40 










40 


Dorchester 


4 


106 


i6 


54 




'ii 


19 


Frederick 


1 


32 










32 


Garrett 
















Harford 


' 2 


'72 




72 








Howard 


4 


54 




18 




i6 


20 


Kent 


1 


19 




19 








Montgomery 


6 


156 


ii 


16 




50 


86 


Prince George's. . . 
















Queen Anne's .... 


' i 


12 




12 








































Talbot 


















' 2 


50 




38 






62 


Wicomico 


3 


62 










Worcester 

















* Excludes duplications among counties and between white and colored classes. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 92— Descriptive Titles of Courses Offered in Maryland County Adult Educa- 
tion Program Under Classifications of Agriculture, Home Economics, Trade and 
Industries, Business Education, and General, 1949-1950 



Type of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Type of Course 



Number 
of Classes 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Machinery and Repairing . . . 

Farm Mechanics 

Food Processing 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Clothing Problems 

Food Preservation 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Furnishings and Decoration 

Meal Preparation 

Parent Education 

Total 

Trade and Industries 

Aircraft Trades 

Arc Welding 

Auto Mechanics 

Blue Print Reading 

Building Construction 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Hours Control 

Machine Shop Practice 

Metal Shop 

Radio and Television 

Related Instruction for Apprentices 

Shop Mathematics 

I Woodworking and Cabinetmaking . 

Total 

Distributive Education 

Merchandising 



156 



81 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Bookkeeping and Typing 

Business Administration 

Business Education 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Typing and Shorthand 

Total 

General 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Ceramics and Pottery 

Clothing 

Community Chorus 

Country Dance 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

English and English Fundamentals 

English for Displaced Persons 

General Educat'n & Fundamentals 

Group Leadership 

Health Training & Phy. Education 

Home Arts 

Home Mechanics 

Industrial Arts 

Interior Decoration 

Jewelry and Gem Cutting 

Lip Reading 

Mathematics 

Merchandising 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal . . 

Nursing 

Nutrition 

Parent Education 

Photography 

Plastics 

Psychology 

Public Speaking 

Radio 

Recreation 

Related Instruction for Apprentices 
Woodwork and Metalcraft 

Total 



132 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE 93— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 1949 and 1950 







Net Roll, 


February 




Type of Class 


White 


Colored 




1949 


1950. 


1949 


1950 



Total 

Americanization 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Commercial (Distributive Education) 
Vocational: 

Industrial 

Home Economics 

Parent Education 

Industrial Training 

Informal Program 

Speech and Lip Reading 

Vocational Education (Veterans) 

Veterans Institute 

Foremanship and Apprentice Training . . 

Total Number of Teachers and Principals 



8,702 

573 
130 
2,580 
424' 

663 
512 
1,378 
180 
525 
13 
191 
93 
1,440 



10,098 

764 
465 
3,208 
370 

1,155 
701 

1,563 
117 
474 
53 
691 

537 



359 



5,119 



657 
957 
147 

986 
970 
544 
46 
40 

672 
100 



2,756 



279 
832 



732 
465 
28 



30 



79 



* Not reported prior to 1950. 



TABLE 94— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1940-1949 and by Type 

of School, 1949 



Type of School 



Number 

of 
Schools 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment 



Net Roll at End of Term 



Total 



Taking 



Review 
Work 



Advance 
Work 



Number 
of 

Principals 

and 
Teachers 



All Schools 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948* 

1949 

White Schools 

Secondary 

Senior 

Junior 

Demonstration 

Colored Schools 

Secondary 

Senior \ 

Junior / 

Demonstration 



6,988 
6,494 
6,994 
6,357 
6,874 
6,465 
6,851 
6,565 
3,686 
4,222 

3,182 

2,156 
828 
198 

1,040 

339 
494 
207 



6,135 
5,728 
6,154 
5,483 
5,976 
5,750 
6,159 
6,039 
3,421 
3,865 

2,886 

1,968 
722 
196 

979 

327 
452 
200 



5,370 
4,987 
4,819 
4,548 
5,108 
5,052 
5,428 
5,287 
2,895 
3,275 

2,536 

1,877 
659 



739 



289 
450 



765 
741 
1,335 
935 
868 
698 
731 
752 
526 
590 

350 

91 
63 
196 

240 

38 
2 

200 



127 
120 
147 
130 
142 
123 
122 
146 
86 
92 

67 

40 
17 
10 

25 

6 
11 

8 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 95 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1942-50 





Applicants 




Year Ending 






Number of 


June 30 


Nonhigh School 


High School 


Certificates Issued 




Graduates* 


Graduates! 




1942 


64 




6 


1943 


70 




14 


1944 


55 




9 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


U.525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


°1,288 


1950 


1,081 


81 


xl,079 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges, 
j Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
° Includes 457 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
x Includes 322 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



134 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 96 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered in Maryland: Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 





Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed; 


Closed — 


County 


Number 


Reha- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Being 


Other 




Cases 


bilitated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


Counseled 


Services 


Total State 


3,562 


818 


56 


313 


750 


1,260 


865 


Baltimore City 


1,690 


363 


39 


195 


369 


544 


180 


Total Counties 


1,872 


455 


17 


118 


381 


716 


185 


Allegany 


162 


35 




11 


46 


55 


15 


Anne Arundel .... 


89 


20 


2 


7 


26 


21 


13 


Baltimore 


292 


68 


4 


26 


62 


118 


14 


Calvert 


15 


4 




3 




7 


1 


Caroline 


32 


5 




3 


'7 


14 


3 


Carroll 


52 


13 


i 


2 


19 


10 


7 


Cecil 


64 


20 


1 


2 


12 


26 


3 


Charles 


29 


6 


1 


3 


6 


9 


4 




58 


12 




3 


13 


26 


4 


Frederick 


62 


10 




7 


15 


22 


8 


Garrett 


43 


6 






11 


18 


8 


Harford 


79 


14 


2 


2 


16 


43 


2 


Howard 


29 


5 




1 


9 


11 


3 


Kent 


37 


4 




4 


6 


17 


6 


Montgomery 


154 


40 




6 


21 


67 


20 


Prince George's. . . 


211 


55 


6 


13 


31 


80 


26 


Queen Anne's .... 


43 


16 




3 


6 


14 


4 


St. Mary's 


21 


4 




1 


3 


8 


5 


Somerset 


44 


14 




1 


7 


19 


3 


Talbot 


31 


10 






6 


10 


5 


Washington 


156 


48 




'8 


31 


56 


13 


Wicomico 


122 


31 




10 


17 


49 


15 


Worcester 


47 


15 




2 


11 


16 


3 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Otherf 


Char- 


Total 


Reha- 


Otherf 


acteristic 




bilitated* 


acteristic 




bilitated* 




Total Number . . 


3,562 


818 


2,744 


Race 












White 


2,643 


651 


1,992 


Age 








Colored. . . . 


918 


166 


752 


Under 21 


1,127 


192 


935 


Other 


1 


1 




21-30 


775 


180 


595 










31-40 


694 


201 


493 


Sex 








41-50 


535 


139 


396 


Male 


2,418 


576 


1,842 


Over 50 


431 


106 


325 


Female .... 


1,144 


242 


902 


Education 








Marital Status 








None 


106 


28 


78 


Single 


1,894 


336 


1,558 


1-3 


235 


47 


188 


Married . . 


1,278 


366 


912 


4-6 


667 


156 


511 


Other 


390 


116 


274 


7-9 


1,281 


290 


991 






10-12 


777 


185 


592 


Employment 








H.S. Graduate 


341 


77 


264 


History (At 








13-14 


78 


13 


65 


time of sur- 








15-16 


42 


12 


30 


vey) 








College 


31 


10 


21 


Employed . . 


373 


134 


239 


Unknown .... 


4 




4 


Unemployed 


3,189 














Never 








Dependents 








worked . . 




105 


680 





2,200 


441 


1,759 


Worked at 








1 


491 


114 


377 


some time . . 




579 


1,825 


2 


325 


97 


228 










3 


218 


61 


157 


Number on 








4 


126 


42 


84 


Welfare (At 








5 


93 


30 


63 


time of 








Over 5 


109 


33 


76 


survey) .... 


292 


58 


234 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (818). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (2,744). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 97— Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 



Type of Service 


Total 
Expenditure 


Number 
of Clients 


Average 
Cost 


Total Expenditure 


1909 Q7Q 0^ 






Excimiriti t ions 








^Medical 


9 257.98 


1 204 


$7.69 


Psychiatric 


70.00 


7 


10.00 


Surgery and Treatment 








Medical 


2,756.66 


106 


26.01 


Psychiatric 


1 446.56 


11 


131.51 


Surgical 


-L£,£OU.OO 


103 


118.94 


Dental 


9 4^9 00 


22 


111.77 






54 


73.35 


Prosthetic Appliances 








Artificial limbs 


1 ^ 044 90 


92 


163.53 


Braces 


3 073 ^3 


68 


45.20 


Hearing aids 


6,911.96 


66 


104.73 


Glass and artificial eyes 


886.10 


81 


10.94 


Surgical appliances 


1,332.36 


49 


27.19 


Wheel chairs, hand and power operated 


146.10 


7 


20.87 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 








Hospitalization 


26,403.83 


133 


198.53 


Convalescent home care 


420.00 


4 


105.00 


Nursing care in client's residence 








Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


1,529.00 


34 


44.97 


Educational institutions 


49,630.30 


358 


138.63 


Employment 


1,825.92 


32 


57.06 


Correspondence , 


432.80 


21 


20.61 


Tutorial 


1,041.25 


27 


38.56 


Training materials 


6,237.16 


234 


26.65 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 








Training 


45,483.40 


220 


206.74 


Medical or physical restoration 


578.32 


16 


36.15 


Inter-current illness 


136.92 


4 


34.23 


Placement 


41.17 


5 


8.23 


Transportation 








Training 


4,031.20 


218 


18.49 


Medical or physical restoration 


773.52 


222 


3.48 


Occupational Tools, Equipment, and Licenses 


4,358.56 


44 


99.06 


Equipment for Business Enterprises Programs 


351.20 


10 


35.12 


Miscellaneous (Other) 


107.86 


20 


5.39 



136 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1950 



AO 



30 



25 



5 



















f- 














I 












1 
/ 


i 














/ 
/ 
1 

/ 

1 












/ / 
/ / 

/ / 
/ / 

-/ H 







Current Exp 


;nses - Bait 


.more City 


^<r> — ■ 


/ / / 
/ / 

y 






-^-^Curr 


?nt Expenses 


^ 

- Counties 










State Aid - 


Counties 
State A 


.d - Baltimo 


-e City 


/ 

/ 

— — 






Mil] 


III! 


[ Till] 


i rrrj 


n i i 


MM 



1923 1928 1933 1938 1943 1948 1953 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 98 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1950 





Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


Debt 


Capital 


School Year 


Total 


State 


Federal 


Local 


Service 


Outlay 



TOTAL STATE 



$12,764,250 


$3,058,180 


$46,966 


$9,659,104 


$789,311 


$4,776,355 


16,147,689 


3,207,088 


69,150 


12,871,451 


2,131,699 


3,430,589 


18,293,874 


4,616,690 


80,139 


13,597,045 


3,142,211 


1,955,727 


20,467,797 


6,196,636 


209,722 


14,061,439 


3,739,854 


2,335,232 


21,301,963 


*5,922,162 


225,625 


15,154,176 


3.985,448 


2,786,810 


22,267,465 


t6,323,786 


216,803 


15,726,876 


3,964,528 


1,262,309 


23,297,176 


6,888,809 


239,686 


16,168,681 


4,055,300 


1,721,378 


23,546,628 


6,960,882 


245,787 


16,339,959 


3,776,207 


834,802 


26,772,479 


9,350,554 


155,604 


17,266,321 


4,119,423 


431,809 


28,121,601 


8,982,115 


520,720 


18,618,766 ' 


4,063,754 


817,053 


31,068,741 


10,803,700 


434,104 


19,830,937 


4,192,979 


2,197,635 


36,621,996 


11,594,496 


1,234,736 


23,792,764 


3,878,466 


3,547,469 


51,175,927 


21,534,379 


1,547,581 


28,093,967 


4,506,683 


10,681,767 


57,567,186 


22,993,313 


1,235,487 


33,338,386 


4,893,175 


20,338,146 


64,661,563 


24,640,596 


2,011,407 


38,009,560 


6,800,278 


27,153,046 



BALTIMORE CITY 



1923 


$6,799,794 


$1,052,845 


$13,256 


$5,733,693 


$685,620 


$3,301,086 


1928 


8,360,391 


999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,580,599 


1,897,871 


1933 


9,312,282 


1,568,928 


11,131 


7,732,223 


1,983,157 


1,267,230 


1938 


10,103,224 


1,463,505 


61,200 


8,578,519 


2,335,256 


758,798 


1940 


10,587,327 


*953,033 


55,462 


9,578,832 


2,304,428 


13,032 


1941 


10,627,658 


tl,347,439 


57,256 


9,222,963 


2,291,143 


145,492 


1942 


10,817,205 


1,467,042 


55,978 


9,294,185 


2,277,294 


238,119 


1943 


10,620,120 


1,495,480 


64,355 


9,060,285 


2,105,427 


17,989 


1944 


11,925,742 


2,265,683 


45,953 


9,614,106 


2,192,721 


8,271 


1945 


12,357,985 


1,981,734 


75,627 


10,300,624 


2,210,496 


113,214 


1946 


13,048,637 


2,176,054 


77,328 


10,795,255 


2,349,885 


605,127 


1947 


14,455,866 


2,243,349 


175,615 


12,036,902 


1,958,255 


372,505 


1948 


20,500,455 


4,779,040 


656,839 


15,064,576 


2,307,374 


431,267 


1949 


22,625,966 


5,016,904 


277,450 


17,331,612 


1,628,980 


823,371 


1950 


25,684,535 


5,422,725 


717,106 


19,544,704 


1,647,487 


4,328,32^ 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



$5,964,456 
7,787,298 
8,981,592 
10,364,573 
10,714,636 
11,639,807 
12,479,971 
12,926,508 
14,846,737 
15,763,616 
18,020,104 
22,166,130 
30,675,472 
34,941,220 
38,977,028 



$2,005,335 
2,207,335 
3,047,762 
4,733,131 
4,969,129 
4,976,347 
5,421,767 
5,465,402 
7,084,871 
7,000,381 
8,627,646 
9,351,147 
16,755,339 
17,976,409 
19,217,871 



$33,710 
51,910 
69,008 
148,522 
170,163 
159,547 
183,708 
181,432 
109,651 
445,093 
356,776 

1,059,121 
890,742 
958,037 

1,294,301 



$3,925,411 
5,528,053 
5,864,822 
5,482,920 
5,575,344 
6,503,913 
6,874,496 
7,279,674 
7,652,215 
8,318,142 
9,035,682 
11,755,862 
13,029,391 
16,006,774 
18,464,856 



$103,691 
551,100 
1,159,054 
1,404,598 
1,681,020 
1,673,385 
1,778,006 
1,670,780 
1,926,702 
1,853,258 
1,843,094 
1,920,211 
2,199,309 
3,264,195 
5,152,791 



* Excludes $492,002 due retirement system on account of teachers which was not appropriated be- 
cause of overpayments in previous years, 
t Excludes $102,501 for above reason. 

N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



138 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Charles 

Garrett 

Calvert 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Howard 

Cnieen Anne's 

Kent 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Carroll 

Anne Arundel 

Frederick 

Prince George's 

■Washington 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Montgomery 



■ State, Excluding 
Equalization Fund 

Received 

from Equalization Fund 



9- 



25 



Federal Aid 

County Levy and 
Other County Funds 

75 100 




2 = 






22 


























Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 99 



Sources of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 


Total 
Current 
Funds 


State 


Federal 


Local Levy 
and Other 
Local Sources 


Per 
Total 


Cent 
State 

Equal- 
ization 
Fund 


FROM E 

Other 


Iach S 

Fed- 
eral 


DURCE 

Local 
Levy 

and 
Other 
Local 
Sour- 
ces 


State 1948-49 


$57,567,185.75 


$22,993,312.96 


$1,235,487.40 


$33,338,385.39 


40 


.0 


15 


.5 


24 


.5 


2 


.1 


57 9 


State 1949-50 


64,661,562.85 


24,640,595.75 


2'01l',406!64 


38,009,560.46 


38 


.1 


14 


.4 


23 


.7 


3 


.1 


58^8 


Balto. City 


t25,684,534.62 


f5, 422,724.84 


717,105.67 


fl9,544,704.11 


21 


1 






21 


.1 


2 


8 


76 1 


Tot. Counties 


£38,977,028.23 


{19,217,870.91 


1,294,300.97 


18,464,856.35 


49 


3 


24 





25 


3 


3 


3 


47 . 4 


Allegany. . . 


3,034,491.34 


1,507,129.43 


316,574.12 


1,210,787.79 


49 


7 


30 


7 


19 





10 


4 


39.9 


An.Arundcl . 


2,727,149.52 


1,545,385.73 


55,682.24 


1,126,081.55 


56 


7 


33 


7 


23 





2 





41.3 


Baltimore 


5,685,241.77 


1,350,239.11 


85,460.58 


4,249,542.08 


23 


8 




5 


22.3 


1 


5 


74 .7 


Calvert 


480,337.21 


345,815.20 


35,109.26 


99)412.75 


72 





50 


7 


21 


3 


7 


3 


20 7 


Caroline . . . 


587,879.89 


409,107.38 


16)024.70 


162,'747!81 


69 


6 


47 


4 


22 


2 


2 


7 


21.1 


Carroll 


1,188,586.73 


672,074.67 


38,625.71 


477,886.35 


56 


6 


33 


7 


22 


9 


3 


2 


40.2 


Cecil 


919,587.72 


443,469.29 


16,947.64 


459,170.79 


48 


2 


26 





22 


2 


1 


9 


49.9 


Charles 


767,795.18 


547,091.72 


82,954.29 


137,749.17 


71 


3 


48 


9 


22 


4 


10 


8 


17.9 


Dorchester . 


805,342.09 


528,326.75 


22,183.15 


254,832.19 


65 


6 


43 


8 


21 


8 


2 


8 


31.6 


Frederick . . 


1,588,841.83 


860,202.48 


47,972.64 


680,666.71 


54 


1 


31 


7 


22 


4 


3 





42.9 


Garrett .... 


847,588.63 


667,263.00 


20,033.79 


160,291.84 


78 


7 


57 


6 


21 


1 


2 


4 


18.9 


Harford .... 


1,378,069.36 


577,863.03 


59,540.05 


740,666.28 


41 


9 


18 


9 


23 





4 


3 


53.8 


Howard .... 


704,800.76 


438,405.02 


20,892.12 


245,503.62 


62 


2 


40 


2 


22 





3 





34.8 


Kent 


476,657.11 


278,075.89 


11,865.60 


186,715.62 


58 


3 


37 


6 


20 


7 


2 


5 


39.2 


Montgome'y 


4,984,414.83 


1,123,548.57 


114,440.66 


3,746,425.60 


22 


5 


4 


9 


17 


6 


2 


3 


75.2 


Pr. George's 


4,472,312.48 


2,411,763,64 


96,249.76 


1,964,299.08 


53 


9 


31 


1 


22 


8 


2 


2 


43.9 


Qu. Anne's . 


525,260.23 


314,569.14 


17,268.57 


193,422.52 


59 


9 


40 


1 


19 


8 


3 


3 


36.8 


St. Mary's. . 


516,302.60 


344,404.81 


51,317.66 


120,580.13 


66 


7 


44 


9 


21 


8 


9 


9 


23.4 


Somerset. . . 


578,849.96 


424,332.69 


24,398.72 


130,118.55 


73 


3 


49 


5 


23 


8 


4 


2 


22.5 


Talbot 


560,660.57 


324,065.24 


11,887.78 


224,707.55 


57 


8 


34 


8 


23 





2 


1 


40.1 


Washington 


2,547,948.62 


1,258,367.59 


106,596.93 


1,182,984.10 


49 


4 


29 





20 


4 


4 


2 


46 4 


Wicomico . . 


943,687.86 


474,970.54 


28,870.35 


439,846.97 


50 


3 


26 


9 


23 


4 


3 




46.6 


Worcester. . 


676,391.04 


392,569.09 


13,404.65 


270,417.30 


58 





35 


7 


22 


3 


2 





40.0 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1949 and excludes those for the cur- 
rent year received after June 30, 1950. Also excludes expenditures made by county, City and State health depart- 
ments for services rendered public school pupils. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: State $1,367,809.00; local 
$515,780.00; total $1,883,589.00. 

% Includes $1,978,830.90 for the Teachers' Retirement System not distributed to the counties in these columns. 



140 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Including Transportation 




Maryland State Department of Education 141 
TABLE 100 



Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Current Expenses 




County 


General 
Control 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 
Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies* 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


Capital 
Outlay! 



including cost of transportation 



Total State 


2 


99 


1 


70 


63 


49 


3 


77 


7 


50 


4 


16 


9 


73 


tS 


66 


29 


56 


Baltimore City .... 


3 


48 


1 


73 


64 


85 


3 


37 


9 


00 


4 


22 


5 


86 


£7 


49 


14 


42 


Total Counties 


2 


66 


1 


68 


62 


o9 


4 


03 


6 


52 


4 


12 


12 


28 


+6 


12 


36 


90 


Allegany 


2 


71 


1 


51 


62 


99 


3 


20 


6 


38 


4 


12 


17 


84 


1 


25 


12 


65 


Anne Arundel .... 


2 


79 


1 


53 


67 


10 


4 


44 


7 


74 


4 


00 


10 


73 


1 


67 


56 


25 




2 


46 


1 


77 


DO 


HQ 


5 




n 
I 


oc 
£o 


O 


1 o 


o 

o 


io 





66 


39 


68 




4 


07 


2 


02 


57 


i i 


o 
o 


14 





oy 


o 
£ 


11 


£.6 


no 

yy 


1 


25 


14 


18 


Caroline 


3 


08 


2 


07 


63 


25 


3 


56 


4 


29 


4 


60 


17 


85 


1 


30 


4 


44 




3 


06 


2 


05 


65 


84 


4 


21 


6 


14 


2 


87 


14 


26 


1 


57 


47 


37 


Cecil 


2 


36 


1 


80 


66 


51 


4 


83 


6 


97 


3 


55 


13 


19 


o 


79 


28 


42 


Charles 


2 


40 


1 


17 


60 


48 


3 


69 


8 


33 


2 


96 


19 


52 


1 


45 


19 


20 


Dorchester 


2 


76 


1 


78 


65 


13 


2 


49 


6 


49 


3 


83 


16 


07 


1 


45 


1 


33 


Frederick 


2 


13 


1 


.64 


67 


32 


3 


07 


5 


86 


3 


12 


16 


11 





75 


21 


88 




2 


81 




68 


61 


27 


5 


29 


4 


01 


2 


67 


19 


13 


3 


14 


5 


14 


Harford 


2 


85 


1 


62 


66 


68 


4 


.73 


6 


41 


5 


83 


11 


23 





65 


72 


.77 




3 


17 


2 


10 


62 


40 


4 


18 


6 


33 


3 


27 


15 


67 


2 


88 


7 


33 


Kent 


4 


07 


2 


72 


64 


28 


3 


14 


5 


65 


3 


51 


15 


98 


o 


65 


61 


18 


1Y.L UU L£ U lild y .... 


2 


65 


1 


79 


65 


23 


4 


72 


8 


58 


4 


93 


11 


43 


o 


67 


40 


36 


Prince George's 


2 


94 


1 


76 


68 


98 


3 


67 


7 


94 


5 


38 


8 


46 


o 


87 


43 


71 


Queen Anne's .... 


2 


76 


2 


55 


58 


82 


4 


42 


5 


27 


4 


14 


18 


87 


3 


17 


11 


76 


St. Mary's 


3 


28 


3 


04 


57 


78 


4 


25 


6 


83 


4 


33 


19 


98 





51 


6 


85 




3 


25 


2 


15 


64 


59 


3 


65 


4 


75 


4 


16 


15 


37 


1 


91 


3 


06 


Talbot 


2 


68 


2 


22 


66 


02 


3 


08 


5 


27 


5 


48 


14 


28 


o 


97 


13 


90 


TIT v.- 


3 


41 


1 


58 


70 


28 


3 


14 


5 


29 


3 


07 


12 


76 


o 


47 


19 


30 


Wicomico 


3 


10 


1 


53 


62 


87 


4 


41 


5 


92 


3 


60 


15 


42 


3 


15 


39 


91 


Worcester 


2 


97 


1 


89 


63 


51 


3 


96 


5 


61 


4 


54 


16 


79 





73 


13 


75 








EXCLUDING 


COST OF TRANSPORTATION 












Total State 


3 


15 


1 


79 


66 


95 


3 


98 


7 


91 


4 


38 


4 


81 


%i 


03 


30 


67 


Baltimore City .... 


3 


49 


1 


74 


65 


00 


3 


38 


9 


02 


4 


22 


5 


65 


+ 7 


50 


14 


45 


Total Counties 


2 


91 


1 


83 


68 


35 


4 


40 


7 


12 


4 


49 


4 


21 


J6 


69 


38 


97 


Allegany 


2 


89 


1 


62 


67 


30 


3 


42 


6 


82 


4 


40 


12 


22 


1 


33 


13 


40 


Anne Arundel .... 


3 


06 


1 


67 


73 


47 


4 


86 


8 


47 


4 


38 


2 


26 


1 


83 


58 


47 


Baltimore 


2 


65 


1 


91 


73 


33 


6 


41 


7 


81 




49 


1 


69 





71 


41 


47 


Calvert 


4 


94 


2 


45 


69 


40 


3 


81 


6 


78 


3 5 


37 


7 


73 


1 


52 


16 


71 


Caroline 


3 


60 


2 


42 


73 


88 


4 


16 


5 


01 


5 


37 


4 


04 


1 


52 


5 


15 


Carroll 


3 


42 


2 


30 


73 


79 


4 


72 


6 


88 


3 


21 


3 


92 


1 


76 


50 


21 


Cecil 


2 


65 


2 


03 


74 


81 


5 


43 


7 


84 


4 


00 


2 


35 





89 


30 


87 


Charles 


2 


87 


1 


40 


72 


36 


4 


42 


9 


97 


3 


55 


3 


70 


1 


73 


22 


14 


Dorchester 


3 


18 


2 


05 


75 


04 


2 


87 


7 


48 


4 


42 


3 


29 


1 


67 


1 


53 


Frederick 


2 


41 


1 


85 


76 


11 


3 


47 


6 


63 


3 


53 


5 


16 





84 


24 


05 


Garrett 


3 


37 


2 


02 


73 


46 


6 


34 


4 


81 


3 


20 


3 


04 


3 


76 


6 


11 




3 


05 


1 


73 


71 


46 


5 


07 


6 


87 


6 


25 


4 


87 





70 


74 


12 


Howard 


3 


64 


2 


40 


71 


48 


4 


78 


7 


25 


3 


75 


3 


40 


3 


30 


8 


31 


Kent 


4 


68 


3 


13 


73 


90 


3 


61 


6 


50 


4 


03 


3 


40 





75 


64 


44 


Montgomery .... 


2 


82 


1 


91 


69 


49 


5 


03 


9 


14 


5 


25 


5 


65 





71 


41 


89 


Prince George's . . 


3 


12 


1 


86 


73 


12 


3 


89 


8 


42 


5 


70 


2 


97 





92 


45 


15 


Queen Anne's .... 


3 


27 


3 


03 


69 


79 


5 


24 


6 


25 


4 


91 


3 


75 


3 


76 


13 


66 


St. Mary's 


3 


94 


3 


65 


69 


46 


5 


11 


8 


21 


5 


20 


3 


81 





62 


8 


13 




3 


70 


2 


45 


73 


54 


4 


15 


5 


41 


4 


74 


3 


65 


2 


36 


3 


47 


Talbot 


3 


05 


2 


52 


75 


07 


3 


50 


5 


99 


6 


23 


2 


53 


1 


11 


15 


51 




3 


64 


1 


68 


75 


13 


3 


36 


5 


66 


3 


28 


6 


74 





51 


20 


36 




3 


51 


1 


74 


71 


34 


5 


01 


6 


71 


4 


08 


4 


03 


3 


58 


42 


97 


Worcester 


3 


49 


2 


21 


74 


51 


4 


63 


6 


59 


5 


33 


2 


38 





86 


15 


75 



* Excludes estimated expenditures for health services rendered public school pupils by county, City and State 
health offices. 

t Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expense excluding debt 
service. 

X Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement funds for county 
teachers are not distributed to the counties in this column. 



142 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 101 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control 

1945, 1948, 1949, 1950 



State of Maryland: 



County 


1945 


1948 


1949 


1950 


State Average 


$2 


67 


$4 


75 


$5 


63 


$5 


93 


Baltimore City 


3 


32 


5 


51 


7 


06 


7 


89 


Total Counties 


2 


27 


4 


31 


4 


84 


4 


94 


Allegany 




92 


4 


46 


4 


76 


5 


37 


Anne Arundel 


2 


53 


4 


84 


4 


69 


4 


32 


Baltimore 


1 


41 


2 


53 


3 


24 


3 


90 


Calvert 


3 


88 


7 


83 


8 


69 


7 


48 


Caroline 


3 


88 


4 


93 


4 


90 


5 


46 


Carroll 


2 


35 


3 


79 


4 


43 


5 


16 


Cecil 


2 


46 


3 


99 


4 


62 


4 


10 


Charles 


2 


45 


3 


80 


4 


08 


4 


05 


Dorchester 


2 


84 


4 


72 


5 


42 


5 


04 


Frederick 


1 


.94 


3 


05 


3 


23 


3 


47 



County 



1945 



1948 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$3.68 
2.02 
2.87 
4.07 
2.80 

1.41 
4.38 
4.53 
3.03 
3.64 

1.85 
3.10 
2.31 



$5.68 
3.73 
5.23 
8.10 
6.09 

4.15 
5.35 
6.29 
3.70 
4.70 

4.67 
3.90 
4.19 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 102 



Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: Counties of Maryland: 

1923—1950 





All Schools 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Year 






























Tot alf 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923. 


$43 


.00 


$46.22 


$17 


07 


$34.84 


$39.84 


$17.08 


$90 


.79 


$91.12 


$77 


38 


1928. . 


52 


62 


55.85 


24 


25 


42.91 


47.81 


22.97 


93 


.51 


95.82 


52 


13 


1933. . 


51 


.89 


54.37 


25 


95 


42.51 


46.82 


24.12 


79 


32 


82.35 


44 


34 


1938. . 


61 


.12 


63.20 


35 


15 


50.70 


53.41 


30. ]0 


87 


59 


90.87 


58 


54 


1940. . 


64 


81 


66.21 


42 


11 


53.88 


56.07 


35.77 


88 


48 


91 .45 


64 


32 


1941. . 


66 


46 


67.74 


45 


32 


55.29 


56.95 


38.69 


90 


69 


93.49 


68 


45 


1942 . . 


70 


36 


70.86 


52 


11 


58.73 


58.75 


43 40 


95 


69 


97.86 


78 


57 


1943. . 


71 


16 


72.48 


56 


54 


60.39 


60.70 


48.34 


100 


46 


102.57 


84 


23 


1944°. 


81 


77 


82.62 


66 


04 


69.04 


71.16 


58.43 


116 


06 


118.20 


100 


45 


1945°. 


86 


64 


86.62 


68 


30 


72.37 


74.83 


60.23 


120 


87 


123.04 


105 


18 


1946 J. 


98 


28 


98.27 


76 


97 


80.29 


83.15 


67.46 


124 


73 


127.02 


107 


44 


1947. . 


114 


54 


114.15 


91 


43 


92.83 


95.84 


76.69 


145 


20 


147.66 


134 


92 


1948. . 


157 


30 


153.19 


122 


59 


124.19 


128.27 


105.62 


194 


71 


198.28 


169 


78 


1949 . . 


172 


47 


163.29 


133 


69 


133.08 


136.89 


115.20 


207 


84 


211.59 


182 


48 


1950. . 


176 


92 


166.09 


140 


53 


137.60 


140.91 


121.18 


208 


07 


211.11 


187 


57 



* Estimated expenditures made by county, City, and State health departments for health services are 
excluded. See TABLE XVI. 

t General Control, Fixed Charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are 
excluded elsewhere in this table. 

% Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

° Includes State and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1950, see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



144 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 104 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 









Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




Salaries of 






Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








visionf 


and 




















Teachers 












Total State 


$148 


13 


$2.99 


$106.48 


$5.98 


$13.00 


$8.43 


$11.25 


$56.26 


Baltimore City 


166 


83 


3.98 


125.14 


6.87 


18.21 


10.74 


1.89 


35.10 


Total Counties . 


140 


91 


2 . 61 


99 . 27 


5 . 63 


10.99 


7.54 


14.87 


64 . 43 


Allegany 


148 


93 


2.63 


108.01 


4.19 


11.45 


7.36 


15.29 


18.22 


Anne Arundel .... 


121 


76 


1.67 


84 21 


5.31 


10.91 


6.70 


12.96 


40.15 




131 


08 


1.98 


94.15 


6.78 


9.53 


8.35 


10.29 


51.43 


Calvert 


179 


44 


6.41 


110.16 


4.88 


14.89 


5.05 


38.05 


26 65 


Caroline 


137 


91 


3.17 


92.62 


5.08 


6.18 


5.85 


25.01 


9.63 


Carroll 


124 


95 


2.59 


87.27 


4.39 


9.44 


4.02 


17.24 


155.48 


Cecil 


128 


04 


3.06 


89.27 


5.10 


8.92 


4.03 


17.66 


75.99 


Charles 


J145 


17 


3.00 


85.94 


6.38 


17.08 


6.20 


26.57 


2.16 


Dorchester 


152 


38 


2.57 


106.75 


3.07 


11.43 


6.63 


21.93 


5.30 


Frederick 


129 


26 


2.35 


89.35 


3.28 


9.35 


3.82 


21.11 


37.80 




150 


65 


2.93 


99 . 03 


7.51 


7.11 


4.29 


29.78 


3.60 


Harford 


131 


67 


2.16 


92.81 


5.27 


10.02 


9.44 


11.97 


158.93 


Howard 


135 


26 


2.54 


91 71 


5.00 


10.15 


4.53 


21.33 


10.85 


Kent 


179 


48 


5.31 


123 . 17 


5.60 


13.76 


6.58 


25.06 


95 . 58 


Montgomery 


175 


35 


4.00 


120.92 


9.29 


16.76 


10.64 


13.74 


134.50 


Prince George's . . . 


130 


62 


2 14 


96 . 95 


4.09 


11.02 


9.07 


7.35 


54.40 


Queen Anne's .... 


168 


81 


4.43 


104.63 


7.19 


10.49 


11.38 


30 . 69 


0.07 


St. Mary's 


U78 


65 


4.65 


111.65 


7.73 


18 . 58 


8.45 


27.59 


9.50 


Somerset 


135 


53 


3.77 


92 40 


6.62 


7.31 


4.57 


20.86 


0.22 


Talbot 


155 


94 


3.79 


99.17 


3.29 


10.99 


17.59 


21.11 


2.53 


Washington 


149 


64 


2.65 


116.00 


3.78 


8.80 


5.48 


12.93 


75.91 


Wicomico 


126 


06 


1.51 


86.01 


5.81 


10.57 


4.69 


17.47 


157.40 


Worcester 


149 


. 55 


2.75 


94.29 


5.02 


11.18 


9.09 


27.22 


10.05 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, kindergartens, Federal funds for school lunches, and estimated ex- 
penditures made by county, City and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

t Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head and Patuxent River are included. 
See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



146 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 105 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior- Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



OOUNTY 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instr 

Super- 
visiont 


UCTIONAL S 

salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


ERVICE 

Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 




$230 


.21 


$4 


.13 


$171.65 


$10 


.85 


$18 


.87 


$9 


.41 


$15 


.30 


$146 


.60 


Baltimore City 


278 


.47 


5 


.01 


218.78 


9 


.91 


28 


.03 


10 


.77 


5 


.97 


46 


.46 


Total Counties 


211 


.11 


3 


.78 


153 . 00 


11 


.22 


15 


.25 


8 


.87 


18 


.99 


186 


.23 


Allegany 


197 


.85 


3 


.62 


145.82 


9 


.08 


14 


.13 


9 


.24 


15 


.96 


43 


.80 


Anne Arundel .... 


205 


.99 


4 


.66 


14o . to 


10 


.66 


15 


.73 


8 


.32 


17 


.89 


474 


.47 




194 


.94 


3 


.63 


138.87 


14 


47 


14 


.87 


8 


.18 


14 


.92 


210 


96 


Calvert 


250 


25 






152.11 


10 


48 


13 


83 


11 


.17 


62 


.66 


72 


65 


Caroline 


225 


87 


4 


.59 


158.11 


9 


88 


11 


.02 


15 


.34 


26 


.93 


13 


11 


Carroll 


210 


89 


4 


.77 


156.15 


11 


74 


12 


03 


6 


40 


19 


.80 


124 


35 


Cecil 


226 


63 


3 


18 


163.60 


13 


76 


16 


52 


9 


.40 


20 


.17 


73 


09 


Charles 


1253 


81 






168.95 


8 


58 


24 


44 


7 


51 


44 


33 


143 


86 




237 


76 


4 


47 


164.22 


7 


52 


19 


74 


12 


56 


29 


25 





61 


Frederick 


197 


56 


3 


04 


145.50 


7 


52 


10 


47 


7 


75 


23 


28 


67 


97 


Garrett 


227 


01 


3 


69 


154.55 


15 


75 


8 


50 


6 


80 


37 


72 


26 


83 




220 


77 


3 


46 


160.88 


14 


00 


14 


52 


12 


14 


15 


77 


220 


62 


Howard 


232 


74 


4 


84 


163.11 


12 


60 


14 


73 


10 


00 


27 


46 


13 


65 


Kent 


258 


01 


9 


22 


190.11 


8 


64 


13 


95 


9 


77 


26 


32 


804 


07 




247 


15 


3 


83 


185.57 


13 


40 


22 


77 


10 


65 


10 


93 


157 


19 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


188 


21 


2 


84 


136.95 


8 


63 


16 


35 


8 


16 


15 


28 


225 


09 


240 


80 


6 


75 


154.42 


13 


36 


16 


33 


7 


04 


42 


90 


76 


89 




241 


56 


9 


94 


137.09 


13 


56 


18 


24 


13 


90 


48 


83 





92 


Somerset 


234 


26 


6 


47 


169 . 88 


9 


52 


13 


91 


12 


81 


21 


67 


9 


84 


Talbot 


209 


91 


5 


86 


153.77 


10 


36 


9 


69 


6 


13 


24 


10 


41. 


65 




205. 


67 


3 


70 


158.54 


9. 


20 


11 


58 


6 


51 


16 


14 


3. 


23 


Wicomico 


202. 


39 


2 


97 


141.44 


11. 


78 


11. 


32 


8. 


97 


25. 


91 


88. 


72 


Worcester 


257. 


51 


3 


07 


181.90 


11. 


87 


14. 


72 


13. 


04 


32. 


91 


78. 


94 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, Federal funds for school lunches, and estimated expenditures made by 
county, City and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

X Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head are included. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 106 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1950 









Instructional Service 




















Total 




























County 


Current 






Salaries of 










Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








visionf 


and 




























Teachers 




















Total State 


$144 


56 


$3 


35 


$109 


12 


$5 


30 


$12 


65 


$6 


38 


$7 


76 


$32.22 




164 


50 


3 


28 


128 


68 


6 


17 


16 


88 


7 


65 


1 


84 


21 . 63 




121 


18 


3 


43 


86 


19 


4 


28 


7 


70 


4 


88 


14 


70 


44.64 


Allegany 


146 


05 





13 


122 


50 


3 


71 


11 


09 


5 


59 


3 


03 




Anne Arundel .... 


115 


05 


1 


77 


89 


78 


3 


89 


9 


25 


3 


04 


7 


32 


32.55 




119 


25 


3 


14 


86 


44 


6 


25 


8 


91 


7 


02 


7 


49 


3.73 


Calvert 


104 


07 


4 


54 


77 


85 


2 


79 


5 


20 


1 


84 


11 


85 


13.41 


Caroline 


119 


68 


3 


79 


82 


25 


2 


61 


4 


94 


2 


18 


23 


91 




Carroll 


119 


89 


5 


17 


72 


86 


4 


77 


9 


60 


3 


05 


24 


44 


233.67 


Cecil 


132 


38 


3 


24 


80 


46 


4 


40 


9 


83 


3 


69 


30 


76 


7.47 


Charles 


107 


88 


2 


68 


73 


83 


4 


57 


5 


33 




82 


19 


65 


3.47 


Dorchester 


122 


66 


4 


23 


85 


11 


2 


84 


5 


03 


2 


87 


22 


58 




Frederick 


107 


22 


2 


30 


75 


94 


3 


80 


7 


26 


2 


18 


15 


74 


8.39 


































Harford 


132 


2i 


4 


52 


96 


97 


5 


99 


6 


57 


6 


95 


ii 


21 


323^67 


Howard 


124 


36 


4 


90 


87 


21 


4 


52 


6 


29 


3 


57 


17 


87 


4.10 


Kent 


147 


23 


5 


05 


96 


28 


5 


61 


6 


10 


6 


55 


27 


64 


185.10 


Montgomery 


164 


05 


4 


82 


103 


84 


4 


62 


14 


48 


10 


55 


25 


74 


211.03 


Prince George's . . . 


119 


48 


3 


34 


88 


70 


4 


21 


9 


94 


7 


53 


5 


76 


34.39 


Queen Anne's .... 


157 


71 


4 


58 


110 


75 


7 


65 


4 


95 


4 


97 


24 


81 


0.02 




123 


54 


6 


80 


82 


29 


2 


34 


2 


36 


2 


27 


27 


48 


27.34 


Somerset 


97 


66 






69 


14 


2 


70 


3 


56 


4 


65 


17 


61 


0.08 


Talbot 


126 


66 


3 


47 


90 


93 


2 


86 


7 


46 


2 


88 


19 


06 


68.89 


Washington 


126 


41 






92 


92 


2 


11 


11 


92 


2 


84 


16 


62 


7.87 


Wicomico 


109 


46 


4 


14 


77 


82 


3 


35 


4 


49 


4 


83 


14 


83 


0.15 


Worcester 


110 


22 


5 


12 


73 


45 


5 


27 


4 


65 


2 


97 


18 


76 


1.03 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, Federal funds for school lunches, and estimated expenditures made by 
county, City and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



148 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 107 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Insti 

Super- 
visionf 


IUCTIONAL 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Service 
Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$200 


18 


$3 


88 


$148 


81 


$9 


01 


$16 


99 


$5 


97 


$15 


52 


$180 


38 




212 


16 


3 


85 


163 


37 


8 


88 


20 


77 


5 


72 


4 


57 


100 


59 


Total Counties 


187 


57 


3 


91 


128 


23 


9 


14 


13 


02 


6 


22 


27 


05 


264 


37 


Allegany 


291 


97 





18 


226 


24 


11 


17 


22 


48 


13 


60 


18 


30 






Anne Arundel .... 


157 


29 






103 


29 


7 


41 


11 


92 


1 


84 


26 


83 


754 


85 


Baltimore 


203 


96 


ii 


32 


133 


70 


16 


12 


25 


32 


4 


55 


12 


95 


373 


06 


Calvert 


184 


54 






110 


01 


9 


91 


9 


53 


6 


65 


48 


44 


32 


7S 




187 


98 


3 


09 


124 


23 


7 


96 


9 


17 


8 


27 


35 


26 








228 


89 


4 


71 


160 


40 


10 


31 


12 


68 


7 


44 


33 


35 


400 


90 


Cecil 


274 


40 


3 


80 


167 


03 


17 


45 


30 


32 


17 


08 


38 


72 


4 


76 


Charles 


182 


16 






123 


64 


6 


65 


13 


25 


6 


72 


31 


90 


91 


80 


Dorchester 


186 


19 






140 


87 


6 


29 


9 


32 


3 


57 


26 


14 





40 


Frederick 


170 


65 


4 


84 


128 


33 


7 


16 


6 


17 


2 


80 


21 


35 




02 






































185 


92 


3 


27 


138 


70 


12 


37 


9 


56 


9 


05 


12 


97 


59 i 


37 




188 


34 


6 


11 


116 


52 


11 


21 


17 


17 


4 


81 


32 


52 


57 


46 


Kent : 


176 


16 






112 


70 


6 


79 


9 


08 


5 


74 


41 


85 


413 


64 




249 


61 


4 


65 


164 


68 


13 


04 


21 


50 


12 


90 


32 


84 


266 


54 


Prince George's . . . 


172 


35 


7 


80 


113 


79 


6 


37 


11 


74 


6 


50 


26 


15 


430 


18 


Queen Anne's .... 


203 


61 


6 


69 


135 


56 


9 


26 


9 


71 


6 


49 


35 


90 


80 


84 


St. Mary's 


236 


08 






158 


83 


15 


20 


10 


75 


13 


63 


37 


62 


36 


68 




152 


17 


4 


98 


109 


90 


4 


04 


7 


34 


7 


67 


18 


24 


22 


27 


Talbot 


165 


19 






132 


87 


6 


15 


4 


57 


1 


38 


20 


22 


4 


23 


Washington 


286 


32 






213 


47 


8 


51 


27 


98 


7 


12 


29 


24 


19 


33 


Wicomico 


179 


05 


2 


84 


125 


48 


9 


38 


6 


88 


5 


29 


29 


18 


38 


16 


Worcester 


162 


28 


2 


26 


115 


55 


6 


79 


7 


00 


5 


05 


25 


63 


45 


88 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, Federal funds for school lunches and estimated expenditures made by 
county, City and State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 





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1 


Total 

Anne Arundel . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester , , . . 



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150 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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420.0 

6 
39.0 
38.0 
15.0 
13.0 

6.0 
10.0 
24.0 
17.0 
13.0 

14.0 
11.0 
28.0 
60.0 
11.0 
13.0 
20.0 
16.0 
7.0 
19.0 
23.0 




1 


376.0 

6.0 
36.0 
33.0 
14.0 
11.0 

7.0 
10.0 
20.0 
16.0 
11.0 

15.6 
10.0 
11.0 
26.0 
51.0 
10.0 
11.0 
19.0 
15.0 
7.0 
18.0 
19.0 


°m 

I 


1 


338.7 

6 1 

33.0 
29.1 
8.0 
9.0 
6.8 
9.0 
20.0 
15.0 
10.5 

15:6 

8.5 
11.0 
24.0 
40.7 
10.0 

9.8 
18.7 
14.5 

6.0 
18.0 
16.0 


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* 
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162.7 

4.3 
13.0 
2.9 
6.0 
7.3 
4.1 
4.0 
12.0 
10.0 
7.0 

5.9 
2.0 
5.0 
7.C 

17.0 
5.0 
8.0 
9.0 
8.0 
2.7 

13.5 
9.0 




1 


102.0 

3.8 
9.0 

2.6 
7.0 
3.0 
3.0 
5.0 
6.0 
3.5 

4.i 

4.2 
4.0 

12.4 
3.0 
2.0 
7.0 
5.8 
2.4 

10.8 
4.0 




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Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's .... 

Queen Anne s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Worcester 



lit 

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Ill 

m 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 110 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland: 1949-50 



Type op 


1950 


1950 


Balance 


Vocational Program 


Allottment 


Expenditures 


June 30, 1950 


Total 


$316,144.44 


$307,451.72 


$3,692.72 




81,371.30 


81,371.30 






113,969.90 


105,277.18 


8,692.72 




52,982.32 


52,982.32 




Teacher Training and Supervision 


48,719.15 


48,719.15 




Distributive Education 


19,101.77 


19,101.77 









TABLE 111 

Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 1949-50 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


All 

Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland .... 

Instruction in Counties: 

Day Schools— White 

Color-d 


$307,451.72 

112,870.00 
23,206.72 
45,145.96 
5,433.00 

26,541.06 
12,583.96 
5,851.88 
1,275.81 
13,787.88 
3,287.50 

2,362.30 
6,386.50 
20,823.29 

27,895.86 


$94,012.80 

59,039.34 
16,500.96 
5,538.50 
292.50 


$122,155.08 

29,891.21 
525.00 
18,621.96 
1,007.00 

24,320.66 
11,734.97 

4,285.95 
905.63 

5,236.00 


$69,054.53 

21,239.45 
6,180.76 

20,858.00 
4,133.50 


$22,229.31 
2,700.00 


Evening Schools — White 

Colored .... 

Instruction in Baltimore City: 
Day Schools— White 


127.50 

2,220.40 
848.99 
1,365.50 


Colored 






Evening Schools — White 

Colored 




200.43 
370.18 


Co-operative and Continuation 




8,551.88 
3,287.50 


Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 




2,362.30 
6,386.50 
9,416.15 

7,461.75 




Volunteer Firemen 








Teacher Training 

State Supervision and Guidance . 


5,463.05 
7,178.45 


5,342.62 
10,729.59 


601.47 
2,526.07 



152 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Salaries 


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£ P 

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Teachers' 
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Travel 


Q 
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Salaries 
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ME ECONOMI 


Teachers' 
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Ho 


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Total 
Federal 
Aid for 
White 
High 
Schools 


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Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



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154 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 

Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties: 1949-50 



County 


Expenditures for Salaries* 


Per Cent of 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Total Counties 


$104,950.15 


$48,234.50 


$46,707.50 


$10,008.15 


46.0 


44.5 


9.5 


$7,131.14 


| $18,486.94 





WHITE 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$93,687.37 


$42,801.50 


$42,034.10 


21,680.06 
3,491.50 
14,28*7.77 


14,645.50 
2,242.00 
7,979.00 


5,112.94 
1,249.50 
5,734.00 


180.00 




180.00 


3,561.71 
169.00 


705.50 


1,057.50 
169.00 


60.50 




60.50 


1,076.64 
805.00 


85.50 
320.00 


807.50 
485.00 


11,091.51 
751.18 
794.00 

21,238.50 
3,459.00 
390.50 


1,682.50 
293.00 
55.00 

8,238.50 
465.00 


8,392.75 
456.00 
739.00 
9,865.41 
2,950.00 
390.50 


3,322.50 


1,440.00 


1,882.50 


1,216.00 
4,924.00 
723.00 
465.00 


336.00 
3,953.50 
66.00 
294.50 


704.00 
970.50 
657.00 
170.50 



$8,851.77 


45 


7 


44 


9 


9.4 


$6,323.70 


$17,458.01 


1,921.62 


67 
64 


5 
2 


23 
35 


6 

8 


8.9 


620.69 
220.00 


2,683.89 
380.00 


574.77 


55 


8 


40 


2 


'4.6 


3,383.04 


4,497.00 


1, 798.7 i 


i9 


8 


100 

29 
100 



7 



56!5 


48.66 
69.61 


48.00 
291.00 








100 
75 
60 











183.64 


'7 
39 


9 
8 



2 


ii'.i 


38.25 


51.00 












1,016.26 
2.18 


15 
39 
6 


2 

9 


75 
60 
93 


6 
7 
1 


'9.2 
0.3 


186.00 
29.83 
168.06 


827.95 
183.00 


3,134.59 
44.00 


38 
13 


8 
4 


46 

85 
100 
56 


5 
3 

.7 


ii'.i 
1.3 


1,101.74 
93.50 


7,210.54 
788.00 




43 


.3 




















176.66 


27 
80 


6 

.3 


57 
19 


9 
.7 


ii'.5 


181.41 
152.77 


118.00 
243.63 




9 


.1 


90 


9 




30.80 


136.00 




63 


.3 


36 


.7 























COLORED 



All Counties $11,262.78 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington .... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



779.98 
,767.00 
,709.23 



184.00 
313.50 
801.76 
15.00 



,069.49 
281.32 
132.00 
815.50 



110.00 



816.00 
468.00 



$5,433.00 

184.00 
1,211.50 
1,299.50 



450.00 



971.50 
93.50 
132.00 
165.00 



110.00 



816.00 



$4,673.40 



555.50 
301.50 



184.00 
313.50 
215.00 
15.00 



187.00 
433.96 



468.00 



$1,156.38 

595. 
108. 



136. 
' 97 
216 



23 



76 



48 


2 


41 


5 


10.3 


23 


6 






76.4 


43 


8 


56 


2 




48 





48 





'4.6 






l66 











100 







56 


i 


26 


8 


ii'.i 






100 







90 


8 






'9.2 


33 


2 


66 


5 


0.3 


100 











20 


2 


53 


2 


26.6 


l66 


6 








l66 


6 












l66 


6 





$807.44 

22.33 
100.00 
294.18 



25.50 
11.17 
27.94 
265.00 



25.32 
36.00 



* Exclude reimbursement of supervisors' and nonteaching principals' salaries and travel expenses. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



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156 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 157 



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158 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 119 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Maryland Pupil 
Transported: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Average Expenditure 





All Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


County 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total State 


$28 
81 


85 


$28 
80 


33 


$29 

85 


64 


$28 


08 
33 


$27 
73 


63 


$28 
84 


76 


$33 


05 


$32 
117 


16 


$34.34 
127.73 


Baltimore City . . 


27 


81 


60 


74 


09 


34 


118 


05 


87 


Total Counties . . 


28 


52 


27 


82 


29 


55 


27 


79 


27 


20 


28 


66 


32 


50 


31 


24 


34.31 


Allegany 


29 


36 


29 


52 


29 


16 


29 


22 


29 


53 


28 


84 


66 


31 


18 


48 


72.83 


Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore 


22 
21 


85 
96 
83 


21 
21 


36 
48 
09 


24 
22 


88 
72 
90 


21 
21 


23 
67 


20 
21 


64 

33 


22 
22 


09 
17 


31 
26 


46 
21 


25 
23 


87 
19 


37.09 
34.07 


Calvert 


40 


33 


52 


48 
38 


89 


43 


64 


57 


00 


30 


97 


20 


27 


47.82 


Caroline 


38 


55 


38 


57 


38 


51 


81 


39 


25 


38 


17 


37 


81 


36 


70 


39.45 


Carroll 


24 


89 


23 


89 


26 


67 


24 


05 


23 


07 


25 


80 


40 


27 


38 


39 


44.05 


Cecil 


30 


15 


29 


52 


31 


19 


28 


31 


27 


51 


29 


67 


48 


29 


52 


01 


43.59 


Charles 


36 


32 


32 


26 


43 


71 


40 


54 


33 


60 


52 


19 


30 


54 


30 


54 


30.55 


Dorchester .... 
Frederick 


46 

32 


70 
48 


48 
31 


79 
70 


43 
33 


79 

66 


46 
32 


65 
11 


48 
31 


32 
25 


44 

33 


68 
40 


46 

37 


83 
35 


49 

37 


63 
41 


40.89 
37.27 


Garrett 


47 


13 


49 


87 


42 


34 


47 


14 


49 


87 


42 


34 












Karford 


19 


62 


19 


62 


19 


61 


19 


77 


19 


64 


20 


00 


18 


53 


19 


si 


17^2 


Howard 


27 


35 


26 


57 


28 


53 


27 


28 


26 


98 


27 


76 


27 


60 


24 


94 


31.03 


Kent 


39 


95 


39 


21 


41 


09 


38 


00 


38 


73 


36 


83 


43 


69 


40 


15 


48.76 


Montgomery . . 


24 


33 


24 


76 


23 


47 


22 


60 


23 


04 


21 


74 


35 


17 


35 


52 


34.47 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


21 

45 
45 
33 


25 
22 
45 
35 


17 
43 
45 
34 


97 
58 
72 
28 


24 
47 
45 
31 


38 
46 
13 
79 


20 
45 
46 
37 


57 
11 
88 
13 


18 
41 
46 

37 


02 
75 
11 
58 


23 
49 
47 
36 


43 
96 
69 

38 


23 
45 
42 
28 


44 

55 
73 
23 


17 

50 
45 
29 


71 
01 
12 

87 


27.72 
40.37 
38.48 
25.45 


Talbot 


36 


05 


36 


98 


34 


67 


41 


29 


42 


61 


39 


58 


27 


97 


29 


39 


25.40 


Washington . . . 
Wicomico 


28 
41 


74 
23 


28 
39 


45 
88 


29 
43 


08 
64 


27 
43 


97 
61 


27 
41 


79 
65 


28 
47 


17 

54 


116 

35 


40 

54 


116 
34 


42 

98 


116.38 
36.31 


Worcester 


40 


12 


38 


67 


42 


45 


46 


69 


45 


00 


49 


51 


30 


11 


28 


65 


32.32 

























N.B.— Underlying data will be found in TABLES 117 and 118. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 120— Number of Maryland Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided 
at Public Expense, and Number of Buses Used, Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Number of Different Schools 


Number of Vehicles 






Schools for White Pupils 




Buses Owned by 


Private 


County 


Total 


Ele- 
rncntjiry 
Only 


Com- 

Elem. & 
High 


High 
School 
Only 


Colored 
Schools 


County 


Con- 
tractors 


Cars and 
Station 
Wagons 


Total State 


♦676 


332 


86 


64 


*194 


242 


tl,057 


I no3 


Baltimore City. . . 


7 


3 


1 




3 




T14 




Total Counties . . . 


♦669 


329 


85 


64 


*191 


242 


U.043 


: # io3 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 


36 
*46 
58 
15 
13 


23 
23 
32 
5 
4 


6 
3 
6 

5 


5 
5 
8 
1 


2 

♦15 
12 
9 
4 


33 
1 


87 
84 
tl04 
29 
38 


12 
1 
1 

5 


Carroll 


19 


8 


8 


i 


2 


'4 


t52 
39 


'4 


Cecil 


22 


11 


5 


3 


3 


1 


7 


Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick 


28 
32 
32 


2 
13 
17 


4 

5 
6 


2 
2 
2 


20 
12 
7 


5 


40 
47 
81 


4 
4 


Garrett 


32 
29 


27 
12 


4 
6 


1 

2 


9 


2 
17 


60 

28 


J16 




18 


6 


3 


1 


8 


29 




Kent 


17 


7 


2 


2 


6 




28 


3 


Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's 


56 
♦51 
25 
23 
18 


33 
24 
11 
13 

5 


4 

3 

2 


7 
7 
3 
2 
2 


12 
*17 
11 

8 
9 


98 
57 


32 
27 
29 
39 


24 
11 


Talbot 


19 


7 


1 


2 


9 


2 


28 


4 


Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


41 

20 
19 


30 
10 
6 


5 
3 
4 


5 
1 


1 
6 
9 


22 


45 
52 
45 


°3 
2 
2 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there, 
t Includes common carrier lines: 50 in Baltimore, 1 in Carroll, and 14 in Baltimore City. 
X Excludes one horse. 

Includes one county-owned station wagon. 



160 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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161 



TABLE 122 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as of 

June 30, 1950 







.... . , 
lyoU Assessed 


■j 

1 Assessed valua- 


Per Cent School 




oCiiooi ooncis 


^^aluation Tax— 


tion per Dollar of 


Bonded Indebted- 




Outstanding 


able at Full Rate 


School Bonded 


ness Is 


of As- 


County 


June 30, 1950 


for County 


Indebtedness 


sessed Valuation 






Purposes 










«fi1 OQQ Q07 17 


«7n qai sen 




2 


2 


Baltimore City 


*16,720,071.13 


tl,702,786,319 


102 


1 







ttA K<7Q OQ(t t\A 


1 OC7 fir^c C/11 
l,yb / ,ooo,o41 


OK) 


3 


3 


Allegany 


3,970.000.00 


131,956,300 


33 


3 





Anne Arundel 


9,064,000.00 


tlll.229.819 


12 


8 


1 




16,635,000.00 


t443,806,416 


27 


3 


7 


Calvert 


614,000.00 


9,874,199 


16 


6 


2 


Caroline 


64,000.00 


20,263,120 


317 





3 


Carroll 


1,500,000.00 


60,935,053 


41 


2 


5 


Cecil 


129,232.20 


t59,692,640 


462 





2 


Charles 


884,000.00 


U8,699,688 


21 


4 


7 


Dorchester 


231,620.00 


34,425,845 


149 





7 


Frederick 


636,800.00 


88,610,080 


139 





7 


Garrett 


1,425,000.00 


23,780,917 


17 


6 







4,087,500.00 


t85,283,626 


21 


4 


8 


Howard 


664,543.50 


27,018,099 


41 


2 


5 


Kent 


900,000.00 


20,948,004 


23 


4 


3 




12,111,163.20 


t324,594,430 


27 


3 


7 


Prince George's 


*6,417,377.14 


fl96,912,505 


31 


3 


3 




823,000.00 


22,659,935 


27 


3 


6 






16,389,340 








Somerset 


9,000.00 


17,750,003 


1,972 


6 


i 


Talbot 


759,000.00 


30,560,890 


40 


2 


5 




492,000.00 


128,320,444 


261 





4 


Wicomico 


1,622,000.00 


58,593,290 


36 


2 


8 


Worcester 


1,540,000.00 


35,250,898 


23 


4 


4 



* Sinking Fund balances have been deducted as follows: Prince George's $252,622.86; Baltimore 
City $2,098,928.87. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority property. 



162 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 123 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belonging: 1949-50 



County 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



Interest 
Payments 



County 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 
ness 



State Average . . 

Baltimore City. 

County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 



$249.05 

147.37 

303.21 

259 . 54 
513.37 
464 . 00 
234.71 
24.47 

452 . 63 
24.43 

194.46 
52.47 
64.91 



$6.14 
4.06 
7.25 



14.03 
9.58 
6.52 
0.74 

4.01 
0.75 
5.38 
1.65 
2.57 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$306.85 
506 . 69 
169.22 
391.30 
493.69 

226 . 40 
323 . 13 

2.53 
235.93 

36.49 
266.99 
400.73 



TABLE 124 



Value of Maryland School Property, 1923-1950 





Value 


of School Property* 


Value i 


>er Pupil Enrolled 


Year 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


Cityt 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


t31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1940 


86,373,506 


49,768,110 


t36,605,396 


291 


412 


208 


1941 


87,253,746 


49,827,220 


Wi ,426,526 


292 


414 


210 


1942 


88,171,154 


49,728,358 


t38,442,796 


296 


421 


213 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


t39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1944 


89,951,808 


50,127,722 


t39,824,086 


304 


427 


223 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


t39,934,051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


t45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


t47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


t53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


t70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 


1950 


147,205,363 


50,659,159 


f96,546,204 


429 


417 


435 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 125 



Value of Maryland School Property* per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1950 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 


per Pupil 


Total 


npr "Pur^ll 


Total 




Total State 






*19Q 7fi7 907 








Baltimore City 


t50,659,159 


446.52 


142,727,895 


575.02 


17,931,264 


202.60 


Total Counties. . . . 


96,546,204 


453.31 


87,039,312 


482.10 


9,506,892 


293.06 


Allegany 


5,527,470 


361.38 


5,440,877 


361.91 


86,593 


330.63 


Anne Arundel . . . 


7,066,430 


400.22 


6,586,000 


487.95 


480,430 


115.51 


Baltimore 


19,026,029 


530.70 


16,819,716 


522.64 


2,206,313 


601.35 


Calvert 


869,340 


332.35 


689,290 


549.85 


180,050 


132.19 


Caroline 


1,638,518 


494.48 


1,369,688 


548.58 


268,830 


329.13 


Carroll 


4,749,700 


674.80 


4,532,900 


682.46 


216,800 


546.51 


Cecil 


2,733,500 


516.83 


2,631,950 


544.63 


101,550 


222.45 


Charles 


11,901,540 


418.28 


11,321,250 


529.05 


580,290 


283.25 


Dorchester 


2,753,750 


623.80 


2,494,538 


826.55 


259,212 


185.61 


Frederick 


2,539,790 


258.91 


2,388,290 


268.11 


151,500 


167.98 


Garrett 


651,608 


140.31 


651,608 


140.31 






Harford 


13,909,150 


484.59 


13,805,150 


539.91 


104,000 


102.04 


Howard 


1,388,000 


353.41 


1,011,400 


330.58 


376,600 


433.92 


Kent 


502,050 


218.26 


447,105 


284.40 


54,945 


75.46 


Montgomery .... 


14,438,895 


588.56 


13,581,375 


608.06 


857,520 


390.31 


Prince George's . 


12,986,407 


458.16 


10,939,477 


462.92 


2,046,930 


434.30 


Queen Anne's . . . 


1,191,750 


467.90 


1,058,950 


579.10 


132,800 


184.85 




1373,542 


143.03 


1300,092 


178.41 


73,450 


79.01 


Somerset 


1,157,233 


325.11 


1,040,333 


487.30 


116,900 


82.06 


Talbot 


769,343 


239.17 


561,139 


260.99 


208,204 


195.19 


Washington 


4,002,080 


296.83 


3,519,080 


266.90 


483,000 


1,624.07 


Wicomico 


5,477,129 


901.61 


5,070,904 


1,131.65 


406,225 


254.88 


Worcester 


892,950 


232.35 


778,200 


320.46 


114,750 


81.11 



* Excludes administration buildings, teacherages, janitors' homes, warehouses, storage buildings, re- 
pair shops, and buildings under construction or no longer in use. 
t Value of equipment has been excluded. 

1 Value of school properties owned by the Federal Government has been excluded. 



164 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 126 

Tax Levies and Appropriations Made by Maryland Counties and Baltimore City: 1949-50 



County 



Total Levied 
by the Counties 
and Baltimore 
City 



Appropriations for Public Schools 



Total for 
Schools 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total State $110,778,702.42 $43,798,746.00 



Baltimore City* . 
Total Counties . . 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel* 
Baltimore*. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 



Carroll* . . . 

Cecil 

Charles .... 
Dorchester* . 
Frederick* . 



Garrett* .... 
Harford* . . . 
Howard* . . . 

Kent* 

Montgomery 



Prince George's 
Queen Anne's*. 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 



Washington* 
Wicomico. . . 
Worcester . . . 



68,500,145.09 

42,278,557.33 

t2,700,101.37 
f3,267,232.89 
tll,289499.91 
224,529.53 
316,274.00 

959,986.11 
831,998.06 
345,928.24 
660,131.30 
1,573,935.23 

f642,368.60 
1,412,872.55 
640,738.17 
663,417.52 
7,907,574.00 

3,842,675.51 
358,167.56 
225,408.12 
t321,978.36 
405,373.90 

1,968,549.93 
1,124,099.38 
595,717.09 



20,951,947.70 

22,846,798.30 

1,596,068.46 
1,483,705.61 
5,283,123.69 
. 149,691.66 
166,816.00 

563,785.22 
560,592.90 
159,909.00 
299,466.75 
975,338.84 

230,191.74 
758,488.13 
316,180.60 
264,835.00 
4,466,635.00 

2,552,961.97 
212,225.60 
123,947.45 
139,037.91 
236,040.00 

1,319,322.73 
626,547.00 
361,887.04 



$37,312,996.74 
£19,364,088.70 
17,948,908.04 

$1, 163,207.96 
1,151,623.81 

$4,307,826.19 
76,766.66 
$146,811.00 

480,930.34 
510,920.04 
144,538.50 
$258,732.00 
$660,898.69 

$163,781.54 
$652,775.65 
249,392.20 
$185,750.00 
3,592,401.00 

$1,791,975.00 
175,298.60 
115,428.64 
$121,916.28 
204,400.00 

$1,086,600.00 
439,312.00 
$267,621.94 



$5,117,382.92 

1,587,859.00 

3,529,523.92 

372,860.50 
286,001.80 
731,964.40 
68,925.00 
9,505.00 

x 

18,987.50 
7,897.50 
40,734.75 
114,440.15 

56,407.20 
14,475.00 
57,752.40 
74,435.00 
874,234.00 

534,661.97 
11,950.00 



7,500.00 
16,640.00 

98,223.00 
129,635.00 
2,293.75 



$1,368,366.34 



1,368,366.34 

60,000.00 
46,080.00 
243,333.10 
4,000.00 
10,500.00 

82,854.88 
30,685.36 
7,473.00 



200,000.00 

10,003.00 
91,237.48 
9,036.00 
4,650.00 



226,325.00 
24,977.00 
8,518.81 
9,621.63 
15,000.00 

134,499.73 
57,600.00 
91,971.35 



* Counties operate on calendar year. 

t State funds excluded: Allegany $225,000; Anne Arundel $220,000; Baltimore $460,000; Garrett $10,615; 
Somerset $2,190. 

$ Local funds for the retirement of teachers are included as follows: Baltimore City $549,475; Allegany $15,000; 
Baltimore $3,232.92; Caroline $3,060; Dorchester $360; Frederick $11,879.70; Garrett $3,540; Harford $3,329; Kent 
$2,800; Prince George's $33,000; Somerset $4,916.28; Washington $60,000; Worcester $2,364.98. 

x Paid out of surplus. 

° Local levy for Bethesda and Silver Spring. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 126A 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates 

1949-50 





Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 






Additional 


















Rates in 


















Districts 


County 








Debt Service 


Published 


and 




Total 


Current 


and 


Tax Rates 


Incorp. 






Expenses 


Capital 






Places 










Outlay 








Total State 


$1.16 


$0 


98 


$0 


18 








Baltimore Cityt 


1.19 


1 


10 





09 


$2 


78 




Total Counties 


1.13 





88 





25 








Allegany 


1.19 





86 





33 




65 


$0.45-1.25 


Anne Arundelf 


1.12 





80 





32 


al 


92 


2 . 39-2 . 48 


Baltimore 


1.10 





91 





19 


2 


08 


60.03 


Calvert 


1.22 


1 


16 





06 


1 


88 


0.75-1.50 


Caroline 


0.89 





73 





16 


1 


30 


0.25-1.15 


Carrollt 


0.86 





72 





14 


1 


25 


0.50-1.00 


Cecil 


0.95 





76 





19 


1 


28 


0.40-1.50 


Charles 


JO. 75 


to 


65 





10 


1 


10 


0.50-0.80 


Dorchesterf 


0.84 





73 





11 


1 


75 


0.65-1.35 


Frederickt 


1.08 





74 





34 


1 


35 


0.10-1.25 


Garrett 


0.71 





66 





05 


2 


00 


0.40-0.90 


Harfordt 


0.94 





76 





18 


1 


42 


0.95-1.10 


Howardf 


1.06 





88 





18 


al 


70 


cO. 04-0. 08 


Kentf 


1.16 





85 





31 
29 


1 

al 


55 
90 


0.35-1.30 
0.30-1.13 


Montgomery 


1.37 


1 


08 





Prince George's 


1.24 





97 





27 


al 


97 


0.08-3.11 


Queen Anne's 


0.90 





79 





11 


1 


35 


0.25-1.25 


St. Mary's 


*0. 70 


to 


65 





05 


1 


40 


0.90 


Somerset 


79 





69 





10 


1 


30 


0.75-1.50 


Talbot 


0.80 





68 





12 


2 


00 


0.85-1.25 


Washington t 


1.41 





90 





51 


1 


50 


0.37-0.90 




0.84 





70 





14 


1 


25 


0.30-0.85 




0.99 





70 





29 


1 


35 


0.25-1.40 





















* Obtained by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valuations, 
t Calendar year fiscal period. 

t Excludes funds from U. S. Navy for schools at Indian Head and Patuxent River. 

° Excludes State property tax. 

a Excludes rates for special service levies. 

b Ad valorem tax. 

c Special levy for police. 



166 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHART 5 

Per Cent of Total Tax Levies Appropriated for Public Schools: 
Counties and Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1949-1950 (1949*) 



County 



Total 



Current 
Expenses 



10 



20 



50 



□ 

4o 50 



Debt Service end 
Capital Outlay 



60 70 



Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 
Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Washington 

Queen Anne'e 

Carroll 

Harford 

Charles 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Howard 

Baltinore 

Prince George's 

F redericlc 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel 

Dorchester 

Calvert 

Somerset 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Kent 

Wicomico 
Garrett 



56.8 

50.6 

45-1 

62.0 
52.9 
56.2 
54.8 
50.9 
47.0 
44.5 
46.0 
44.5 
49-5 
46.8 
55.1 
49.7 
41.2 

41.5 
56.4 
61.0 
55-4 
58.8 
57.2 
57.7 
57.1 
52.4 




* Calendar year 1949. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



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168 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



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170 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 130 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1949-50 



County 



Total Basis Assessable at 
Full Rate for County 
Purposes 



Number of 
Pupils Belonging 



Total State 

Baltimore City. . . . 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$3,704,060,526 

*1,718,131,719 

1,985,928,807 

131,956,300 
*111,348,743 
*448,614,108 
9,874,199 
20,263,120 
*60,935,053 
60,267,140 
19,358,908 
*34,425,845 
*88,610,080 
*23,780,917 
*89,136,826 
*27,018,099 
*20,948,004 
325,958,316 
203,908,349 
*22,659,935 
16,389,340 
17,750,003 
30,560,890 
*128,320,444 
58,593,290 
35,250,898 



326,436 

113,455 

212,981 

15,296 
17,656 
35,851 
2,616 
3,314 
7,039 
5,289 
4,546 
4,414 
9,810 
4,644 
8,067 
3,927 
2,300 
24,532 
28,345 
2,547 
2,612 
3,559 
3,217 
18,482 
6,075 
3,843 



* Calendar year (1949). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



CHART 6 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1949-1950 



County 



Per Capita Income Tax 
6 8 

— i r 



10 



•Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 



Montgomery 

Talbot 
Washington 

Baltimore 
Wicomico 
Queen Anne' 3 

Prince George' 3 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Harford 

Howard 

Anne Arundel 

Worcester 

Cecil 

Kent 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, Fiscal Year 1950, page 94; 
population estimates from 1950 Census of Population, preliminary. Bureau of the Census, U. S. 
Department of Commerce. 



172 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



CHARTS 7 and 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Fourteen States, Including Maryland: 1949 
1950 and Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1950 



Per Capita Income Payments (in Hundreds of Dollars) 

2 L 6 8 10 12 11 16 13 2 C 

T — I i I ' I ' — I — ' 1 ' i — » — I — 



1 


Delavare 


EBB 


2 


Nevada 


■BBi 


3 


New York 




U 


Connecticut 


BKEB 


5 


Illinois 




6 


California 




7 


Nev Jersey 


K689 


8 


Washington 




9 


Montana 




10 


Massachusetts 




11 


Michigan 


BEE 


12 


Ohio 




13 


Rhode Island 




U 


Maryland 


BKSfl 



16 



12 



[ II I II 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

1929 1955 1941 19^7 1955 

Year 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1951. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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174 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 133 

Total Enrollment* at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 
Fall of 1940-1949 



Fail of 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 


1940 


1,259 


953 


221 


221 


511 


306 


150 


156 


1941 


1,139 


823 


195 


209 


419 


316 


155 


161 


1942 


912 


638 


145 


159 


334 


274 


120 


154 


1943 


776 


537 


96 


154 


287 


239 


109 


130 


1944 


684 


440 


83 


120 


237 


244 


110 


134 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,704 


1,372 


336 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1,688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 



* Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students ; 
see also TABLES 134, 135, and 136. 



TABLE 134 

Enollment by College and Class: Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1949 





Grand 


Total 








Total 






Class 


Total 


White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 



TEACHER TRAINING 



Total 


1,594 


1,204 


279 


167 


758 


390 


190 


200 




524 


392 


102 


38 


252 


132 


82 


50 


Sophomore 


389 


302 


65 


22 


215 


87 


32 


55 


Junior 


395 


288 


62 


67 


159 


107 


44 


63 


Senior 


286 


222 


50 


40 


132 


64 


32 


32 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Total 


362 


357 


94 


117 


146 


5 


5 




Freshman 


229 


225 


59 


75 


91 


4 


4 




Sophomore 


133 


132 


35 


42 


55 


1 


1 


• • • 


OTHER STUDENTS 


Extension or 


















Evening 


142 


127 


71 


56 




15 


15 




Elementary School . . 


1,520 


553 


162 


125 


266 


967 


116 


85i 



176 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 136 

Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges by County-Class: 

Fall of 1949 





Grand Total 


Total White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Area 


Total 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 




Grand Total 


362 


229 


133 




132 ' 


59 
3 


35 


75 


42 


91 


OO 






Out-of-State 


20 


16 


4 


16 


4 


12 


4 


1 






Baltimore City . . . 


70 


41 




A 1 


9Q 






q 




qs 


9Q 






Trivial fminHpa 


272 


172 


100 


168 


99 


56 


35 


60 


38 


52 


26 


4 


1 


Allptriinv 


87 


53 


34 


53 


34 


53 


33 








1 






Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore 


4 

57 


3 
33 


1 

24 


3 
33 


1 

24 




i 


1 


3 
32 


1 

23 






Calvert 


2 


2 


2 






2 










8 


6 


2 


6 


2 






5 


2 


i 








Carroll 


3 


3 




2 












2 




1 




Cecil 


4 


4 




4 








2 




2 








Charles 


3 


3 




2 








2 








i 




Dorchester 


10 


8 


2 


8 


2 






8 












Frederick 


1 






1 








1 












Garrett 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 






1 










14 


10 


4 


9 


I 3 






3 




6 








Howard 


2 


2 




2 












2 








Kent 


1 






1 








i 












Montgomery . . . 


2 


1 


i 


1 


i 






1 






i 






Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 


4 


4 




4 


!• • 






2 












Somerset 


9 


5 


4 


5 


4 






5 


4 










Talbot 


3 


1 


2 


1 


2 






1 


2 










Washington .... 
Wicomico 


2 
39 


2 
19 


20 


2 
19 


20 


2 




i9 


20 










Worcester 


13 


9 


4 


8 


4 






7 


4 


i 




i 































178 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 137 



Enrollment in Public Junior Colleges of Maryland by County : 
Fall of 1949 



Area 


Grand Total 


Baltimore 
City 


Hagerstown 


Montgomery 


Grand Total 


1,042 


431 


219 


392 


Out-of-State 


135 


9 


21 


105 




336 


334 




2 




571 


88 


198 


285 




3 


1 


2 




Anne Arundel 


6 


4 




2 




66 


66 






Calvert 


1 


1 


















2 


2 






Cecil 


2 


2 


















i 


i 








6 


1 






Garrett 












7 


'f 






Howard 










Kent 


2 


2 






Montgomery 


275 


1 




274 


Queen Anne's 


8 






8 












i 






i 


Somerset 










Talbot 










Washington 


i9i 




19 i 




Wicomico 





















Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



TABLE 138 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1941-1950 







Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 
Endino 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees 


To 
State 



FROSTBURG 



1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 



210 


$82,220 


$36,535 


$45,685 


$392 


a$174 


$218 


186 


83,889 
69,071 


33,398 


50,491 


451 


al79 


272 


116 


20,757 


48,314 


595 


al79 


416 


75 


♦85,257 


13,536 


♦71,721 


1,136 


al80 


956 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


♦71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


6134 


568 



SALISBURY 



1941 


211 


$84,281 


$40,444 


$43,837 


$400 


a$192 


$208 


1942 


194 


92,625 


37,588 


55,037 


478 


al94 


284 


1943 


143 


68,922 


23,185 


45,737 


482 


al62 


320 


1944 


114 


♦87,428 


22,572 


♦64,856 


767 


al98 


569 


1945 


103 


♦93,031 


21,157 


♦71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


6211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


6194 


751 



TOWSON 



1941 


482 


$219,112 


$82,597 


$136,515 


$455 


a$171 


$284 


1942 


403 


222,487 


74,468 


148,019 


553 


al85 


368 


1943 


292 


187,934 


53,264 


134,670 


644 


al83 


461 


1944 


234 


♦208,906 


43,145 


♦165,761 


892 


al84 


708 


1945 


222 


♦211,981 


46,227 


♦165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


6106 


572 



BOWIE 



1941 


140 


$60,295 


$19,270 


$41,025 


$431 


d$138 


$293 


1942 


144 


63,134 


19,359 


43,775 


439 


dl35 


304 


1943 


104 


56,693 


15,960 


40,733 


545 


dl53 


392 


1944 


103 


♦72,307 


14,939 


♦57,368 


702 


tfl45 


557 


1945 


103 


♦76,536 


15,099 


♦61,437 


743 


dl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


cl41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


A81 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


A27 


899 



♦ Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

/ Resident students paid $171. There is no tuition fee except for out-of-state and junior college 
students. 



180 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 141 



Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service and Their 
Contributions* During the Year Ending July 31, 1950 



County or Institution 


Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1950 


Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1950 


Grand Total 


$1,049,302.39 


6,575 


Total Counties 


$973,220.79 


6,233 


Allegany 


82,069.61 


503 


Anne Arundel 


70,726.73 


453 


Baltimore 


144,453.94 


912 


Calvert 


10,279.75 


81 


Caroline 


14,809.79 


105 




O 1 A AO i O 


OQA 
&C± 


Cecil 


25,056.16 


168 






1 At\ 
11V 


Dorchester 


22,828.86 


158 




a o z t\f\ a c 

42,oyo.yo 


077 


Garrett 


21,113.70 


141 


Harford 


33,592.62 


230 




1 C OO A 

lo.aoO.o i 


111 


Kent 


13,468.11 


86 


Montgomery 


137,059.74 


746 


Prince George's. . . . 


110,346.98 


724 


Queen Anne's 


13,624.67 


93 


St. Mary's 


10,435.77 


74 


Somerset 


16,707.93 


122 


Talbot 


14,352.39 


100 


Washington 


75,135.96 


452 


Wicomico 


28,224.99 


206 


Worcester 


19,338.45 


121 


Total Schools and Departments 


$76,081.60 


342 


Junior Colleges 


$ 8,617.44 


30 


Hagerstown 


4,510.56 


10 


Montgomery 


4,106.88 


20 


Teachers Colleges 


$31,261.64 


140 


Bowie 


3,077.50 


16 


Frostburg 


7,761.95 


29 


Salisbury 


5,577.84 


28 


Towson 


14,844.35 


67 


Departments 


$21,133.88 


90 


County Libraries 


3,626.44 


24 


Education 


17,123.24 


64 


Retirement 


384.20 


2 


Other Schools 


$15,068.64 


82 


Barrett School for Girls . 


952.87 


8 


Md. School for the Deaf 


4,627.17 


26 


Md. Training School for Boys 


4,109.70 


20 


Montrose School for Girls . 


1,789.58 


10 


Rosewood State Training School . . 


2,248.58 


10 


St. Mary's Seminary Junior College 


1,340.74 


8 



* To the Annuity Savings Fund. 



182 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 143 



Income by Source for Maryland Libraries Open to the Public and Amount per 
Capita: Year Ending June 30, 1950 



VUUiN 1 X 


Source of Income 


Prelimi- 

Census 
April ' 
1950 


Total 

A mnnnf" 

V a pi X<L 


Total 


County 
Funds 


City or 
District 
Funds 


State 
Funds* 


Other 
Funds 


Total State 


$1,886,238 


$240,490 


$1,485,252 


$48,198 


$112,298 


2,324,243 


$.81 


Baltimore City 


1,389,885 




1,333,467 


17,182 


39,236 


940,205 


1.48 


Total Counties 


496,353 


240,490 


151,785 


31,016 


73,062 


1,384,038 


.36 


Allegany 


20,281 




18,300 




1,981 


89,484 


.23 


Anne Arundel .... 


30,472 


23,03 i 


1,000 


4,i03 


2,338 


111,187 


.27 




98,275 


84,111 




6,233 


7,931 


269,362 


.36 


Calvert 












12,272 






360 








360 


18,198 


' .02 


Carroll 


10,600 








10,600 


44,504 


.24 


Cecil 


15,383 


11,977 




2,113 


1,293 


33,320 


.46 


Charles 


235 






235 




23,363 


.01 


Dorchester 


3,767 


1,750 


1,200 




Sli 


27,780 


.14 


Frederick 


17,158 


5,000 


5,035 




7,123 


62,158 


.28 




6,752 


4,703 




1,758 


291 


21,206 


.32 




22,323 


17,775 


'700 


2,104 


1,744 


52,014 


.43 


Howard 


6,818 


5,303 




1,374 


141 


23,064 


.30 


Kent 


1,136 








1,136 


13,66 =S 


.08 




104,753 




95,200 




9,553 


163,749 


.64 


Prince George's . . . 


57,753 


39,022 


11,390 


5,369 


1,972 


193,799 


.30 


Queen Anne's .... 


7,818 


5,600 




1,158 


1,060 


14,491 


.54 


St. Mary's 


786 






585 


201 


28,953 


.03 


Somerset 


1,878 


900 


200 




778 


20,710 


.09 


Talbot 


16,787 


6,117 


2,500 


1,503 


6,667 


19,368 


.87 




57,579 


23,640 


15,760 


2,409 


15,770 


78,726 


.73 




14,376 


11,561 




2,072 


743 


39,541 


.36 


Worcester 


1,063 




'500 




563 


23,124 


.05 



* Excludes appropriation of $70,946 for Division of Library Extension. 



184 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



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186 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE 146 



Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health, Year Ending June 30, 1950 





O d 




Number of 
Children 


Number of 






Time* 
















County 




Given to 


Ex- 




Total 












IB 


Service 


amined by 




Opera- 


Fillings 


Teeth 


Clean- 


Treat- 








Dentist 


Treated 


tions 


Inserted 


Extracted 


ings 


ments 


Total 


33 




39,261 


7,063 


30,097 


15,612 


6,526 


2,546 


5,413 


Allegany 




Full 


4,513 


902 


4,319 


622 


1,493 


391 


1,813 


Anne Arundel 




Part 


663 


413 


689 


211 


419 


59 




Baltimore 


21 


Part 


15,803 


2,058 


12,375 


8,080 


2,129 


1,008 


1,158 


Calvert 




Part 


75 


75 


153 


32 


107 




14 


Charles 




Part 


470 


93 


404 


237 


132 


' 3 


32 






Part 


213 


177 


581 


445 


76 


6 


54 


Harford 




Part 


288 


272 


1,028 


557 


296 


31 


144 


Howard 




Part 


1,574 


686 


791 


233 


307 


194 


57 


Kent 




Part 


272 


204 


648 


334 


301 




13 


Montgomery 




Full 


13,082 


822 


3,691 


2,254 


657 


'i6 


764 


Prince George's 




Part 


69 


45 


118 


76 


39 


3 


'is 


Somerset 




Part 


23 


15 


84 


31 


26 


9 






Full 


2,216 


1,301 


5,216 


2,500 


544 


826 


1,346 



* fc The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



LIST OF FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL TABLES 
Maryland, 1949-50 

Page 

Financial Statements 188-190 

I Number of Public Schools 191 

II Total Public School Enrollment 192-193 

III Catholic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 194-195 

IV Non-Catholic, Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching 

Staff 196-198 

V Total Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 199 

VI Average Number of Pupils Belonging: Public Schools 200 

VII Average Daily Attendance: Public Schools 201 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance: Public Schools 202 

IX Average Days in Session; Per Cent of Attendance: Public Schools.. 203 
X Number of Teaching and County Office Positions: Public 

Schools 204-205 

XI A. Receipts from State of Maryland 206 

B. Receipts from Federal Government 207 

XII Receipts from All Sources 208 

XIII Disbursements for All Purposes 209 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 210 

XV Disbursements for Instruction and Operation 211 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance, Auxiliary Agencies, and Fixed 

Charges 212 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service and Capital Outlay 213 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Schools 214 

XIX Disbursements for White High Schools 215 

XX Disbursements for Colored Elementary Schools 216 

XXI Disbursements for Colored High Schools 217 

XXII Cost, Teachers, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates and Courses 

in Individual Public High Schools 218-223 

XXIII Enrollment bv Subject in Individual Public High Schools 224-229 

XXIV Statistics of Public Libraries 230-231 



188 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Department of Education and the State Teachers Colleges: 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Source or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Frostburg 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Salisbury- 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Bowie 
State Teach- 
ers College 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1948-1949 
General Fund Appropriation .... 

Student's Fees 

Receipts to Budget Items. . . . 
Transfers by Budget Amendments 

Total Funds Available 


% 9,778.23 
414,060.00 

36,594.42 


$ 10,480.19 
480,130.00 
116,349.21 
47,910.69 
11,480.00 


$ 8.69 
215,462.00 
48,033.38 
37,276.62 


$ 2,968.81 
226,977.00 
55,342.11 
17,514.98 
13,000.00 


$ 46,135.50 
187,186.00 
26,125.28 
27,400.31 








$460,432.65 


$666,350.09 


$300,780.69 


$315,802.90 


$286,847.09 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special 
Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power, and Water . 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing Other than Office 

Supplies 

All Other Contractual Services . 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies . 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning, and 

Disinfecting Supplies 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical Sup- 
plies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Material 

Materials for Equipment 

Highway Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory 

Equipment 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Equipment 

Motor Vehicles 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment 

Tools and Machinery . . 

Rent 

All Other Equipment 

Nonstructural 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Cafeteria 

Veterans' Clearing Account .... 

Prior Year Funds 

Refunds on Students' Fees 

Summer Session 

Total Disbursements .... 

Unexpended Balance Returned 
to State Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1950 



$352,770.48 
556.01 
1,283.96 
42.00 
27,739.58 
428.11 
11,122.24 

4,477.20 
3,938.73 



6,094.11 



5,695.89 
4,252.68 



5,521.99 

5,396.33 
251.05 
1,263.50 

' 889.62 



$431,723.48 



$ 21,724.70 



$ 6,984.47 



$421,254.91 
9,712.54 
1,125.94 
10,777.59 
1,148.00 
165.28 
4,249.83 

5,085.59 
519.08 
69,350.00 
42.50 
15,911.23 
2,699.55 
677.07 

1,607.21 
56.50 

5,823.36 

224.46 
1,597.34 

464.57 

369.70 
6,661.31 

466.88 
8,720.62 

.36 
1,370.04 
26.00 
1,843.38 
6,259.43 



2,788.95 



11,483.80 
1,761.60 



748.72 



596.39 
2,309.02 

24,534.11 
8,054.43 
1,257.00 

10,716.96 



$642,461.25 



$ 7,296.56 



$ 16,592.28 



$188,664.89 
4,252.52 
194.54 
3,434.17 
1,112.67 
14.32 
1,597.76 

1,199.02 
1,608.23 
24,529.34 



4,036.26 
1,142.63 
634.92 

582.76 



413.60 



1,247.00 

4,620.66 
94.92 
35.00 

' 416.50 
158.42 
235.00 
387.33 
19,179.55 
8.69 
1,488.50 



$274,783.62 



$ 10,521.30 



$ 15,475.77 



$170,242.68 
17,741.08 
509.06 
5,819.93 
999.87 
3.61 
1,624.91 

229.20 
1,669.31 
35,010.79 



5,726.41 
394.27 
880.23 

1,259.47 
23.30 



2,850.53 


4,325.02 


2,647.56 


158.23 




438.39 


808.94 


1,007.59 


1,198.90 


35.20 


13.00 


43.78 


3,163.85 


4,109.14 


929.07 


81.69 


34.93 


6.45 


806.08 


2,924.81 


731.89 


48.10 




8.96 






164.35 




70.88 






22.79 


2.42 


1,366.55 


576.02 


36.27 


4,175.25 


1,270.60 


2,070.70 



711.11 

817.40 
1,397.00 

5,859.19 

17.27 

' 420.54 



8,974.75 
2,184.82 
1,647.50 



$278,518.48 



$ 7,211.89 



$ 30,072.53 



190 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1950 



Source and Purpose 


Total 


Bowie 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Balance Forwarded from 1949: 

General Construction Loan of 1947 
Deferred Maintenance 


$27,310.86 
87.40 
225.24 
31,000.00 


$11,983.00 
87.40 


$2,385.60 




$12,942.26 


Reconstruction of Dormitory .... 
Construction of Dormitory 


$225.24 


Dormitory for Boys 






31,000.00 


Total (Forwarded from 1949) 

Unexpended Amounts Remaining in the 
General Construction Loan of 1949 
Men's Dormitory 








$58,623.50 
$844,000.00 

a aaa aa 

150,000.00 
100,000.00 

145,135.00 
50,000.00 

150,000.00 
25,000.00 

375,000.00 

100,000.00 
7,000.00 


41 O 070 Af\ 

$250,000.00 
250,000.00 
150,000.00 
100,000.00 


»0 QOC £?A 


$225.24 
$250,000.00 


$43,942.26 

$344,000.00 
200,000.00 


"O nil or "PloT-ir 




Fire Protection System 






Sewage Disposal Plant 








Additional Land (Frostburg in- 
cludes sale of building $135.00) 
Athletic Field 


$75,135.00 
r;n aaa no 

150,000.00 


rrr\ AAA AA 

70,000.00 








Science Building 








Garage 




25,000.00 




"^^omen's Dormitory 






375,000.00 
100,000.00 

7 AAA AA 


Dining Hall and Kitchen Facilities 
Equipment, Repairs, Improvements 

Total Available 








$2,454,758.50 


$762,070.40 


$277,520.60 


$345,225.24 


$1,069,942.26 


Disbursements 

General Construction Loan of 1947 
Deferred Maintenance 


$8,764.77 
80.00 

15,978.56 
8,399.07 
1,370.00 
4,373.25 

137,498.95 
35,760.17 
9,817.03 
3,297.08 


$4,791.55 
80.00 

12,004.20 
4,821.57 
1,370.00 
4,373.25 


$2,385.60 




$1,587.62 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 




General Construction Loan of 1949 
Men's Dormitory 




$3,400.00 


574.36 
3,577.50 


Boiler Plant 




Fire Protection System 






CoTTTo crp T^ior»(**c!5i 1 "Plant" 








Additional Land (Frostburg in- 
ciuucs «poo i .uu transierrtJQ xo 

DPT "Nn 


Oo,U£o.lO 

35,760.17 


cq A7(\ 77 




Athletic Field 






Women's Dormitory 






9,817.03 
3,297.08 


Equipment, Repairs, Improvements 








$225,338.88 


$27,440.57 


$10b,l io.ito 


• 70 Q7A 77 


3j>lo,ooo.oy 


Balance rorwarded to 1951: 

General Construction Loan of 1947 


$18,546.09 
7.40 
225.24 
31,000.00 

828,021.44 
441,600.93 
148,630.00 

95,626.75 
7,636.05 

14,239.83 
150,000.00 

25,000.00 
365,182.97 
100,000.00 
3,702.92 


• 7 1Q1 AC 

n ai\ 
1 .4U 






$11,354.64 








Construction of Dormitory 




$225.24 




Dormitory for Boys 






31,000.00 

343,425.64 
196,422.50 


General Construction Loan of 1949 
Men's Dormitory 


237,995.80 
245,178.43 
148,630.00 
95,626.75 




246,600.00 


Boiler Plant 




Fire Protection System 
















$7,106.82 
14,239.83 
150,000.00 


529.23 


Athletic Field 














Garage 




25,000.00 


365,182.97 
100,000.00 
3,702.92 








Dining Hall and Kitchen Facilities. 
Equipment, Repairs, Improvements 

Total Balance Forwarded to 1951 








$2,229,419.62 


$734,629.83 


$171,346.65 


$272,354.47 


$1,051,088.67 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 











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1,685.9 
332.0 

284.8 
47.7 

1,353.9 

136.2 
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Pupils 

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4,159.7 
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590.8 
527.6 
118.2 

2,923.1 

264.4 
212.1 
427.2 
24.0 
52.0 
121.5 
91.8 
47.7 
60.5 
159.1 
67.5 
114.0 
57.0 
32.3 
339.3 
363.2 
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30.0 
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124.1 
88.8 

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20.2 
54.2 
42.7 
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64.5 
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167.5 

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108.4 
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4.3 
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24.6 
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35.2 

130. i 
91.6 

1.6 

55.3 
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Elementary . . . 
Occupational 
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otal Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charl-s 

Dorchester . . . . 
Frederick 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



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207 



TABLE XI-B — Receipts from the Federal Government for Public School Purposes* in Mary- 
land: Year Ending June 30, 1950 





Total 




School 


From Veterans Administration 




County 


Federal 
Funds 


Vocational 
Education 


Lunch 
Program 


Institutonal 
On-the-Farm 
Training 


On-the-job, 
Related 
Training 


Schools 


Other 



Total State 

Baltmore City . . 

Total Counties. 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard ...... 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Pr. George's. 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's. . . 
Somerset. . . . 
Talbot 



Washington 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester . . 



$2,011,406.64 

717,105.67 

1,294,300.97 

316,574.12 
55,682.24 
85,460.58 
35,109.26 
16,024.70 

38,625.71 
16,947.64 
82,954.29 
22,183.15 
47,972.64 

20,033.79 
59,540.05 
20,892.12 
11,865.60 
114,440.66 

96,249.76 
17,268.57 
51,317.66 
24,398.72 
11,887.78 

106,596.93 
28,870.35 
13,404.65 



$291,845.98 

66,047.47 

225,798.51 

35,733.34 
15,984.42 
23,234.24 
1,462.31 
961.37 

1,678.81 
1,614.05 
10,975.33 
5,029.72 
5,183.90 

6,854.37 
13,289.50 
4,129.13 
1,853.69 
33,896.94 

15,879.44 
4,259.19 
6,197.07 
2,392.48 
3,511.76 

27,633.86 
1,554.38 
2,489.21 



$685,898.61 

122,265.63 

563,632.98 

141,898.88 
29,630.89 
51,362.61 
2,326.19 
9,534.61 

20,370.25 
8,641.96 
6,809.95 
8,947.81 

29,688.61 

5,698.63 
27,313.16 
9,736.89 
4,867.07 
68,109.49 

53,990.72 
4,759.96 
1,603.34 
8,128.49 
5,797.23 

42,122.83 
14,422.39 
7,871.02 



$225,382.11 



225,382.11 

6,775.50 
9,878.70 
8,831.35 
31,320.76 
5,528.72 

14,603.03 
5,721.45 

13,827.66 
7,321.60 
8,615.17 

7,480.79 
8,937.39 
7,026.10 
5,144.84 



26,379.60 
8,249.42 
7,006.18 

13,877.75 
2,578.79 

12,720.29 
10,512.60 
3,044.42 



$53,442.41 
31,282.04 
22,160.37 



2,032.38 



1,973.62 
970.18 



884.02 
4,484.96 



9,434.23 



2,380.98 



$653,985.11 

497,510.53 

156,474.58 

132,166.40 
188.23 



24,119.95 



$100,852.42 



100,852.42 



t51 f 341.35 



10,000.00 

3,000.66 



t36,511.07 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1949 and excludes those for the cur- 
rent year received after June 30, 1950. 

t For salaries, operation, and maintenance expenditures at the Indian Head School in Charles County and the 
Frank Knox School in St. Mary's County. 



208 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



Tuition 
and Other 
Fees from 
Pupils and 
Patrons 


$254,516.99 

63,968.14 

190,548.85 

3,979.45 
569.00 
19,423.67 


143.00 
1,076.88 


368.00 
96.00 

35,190.56 
400.00 
438.25 
o84.239.51 

18,936.38 


138.00 

625,183.15 
187.00 
180.00' 


Payments from 
Adjoining 

Cities, 
Counties, 
and States 


$36,136.20 

36,136.20 
18,550.07 
1,598.43 


1,197.50 

4,089.50 
120.00 
385.00 
70.00 

1,401.93 

2,833.25 
414.00 
382.00 

1,250.00 
490.00 

830.53 
815.00 


85.00 

488.99 
50.00 
1,085.00 


Licenses, 
Special 
Taxes, and 

nterest on 
Deposits 


$709,485.73 

c52,321.50 

657,164.23 

29, 60 1.96 
cl, 876.66 
951.08 
20,049.35 
23,993.52 

35,377.71 


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1,433.91 
170.82 
941.30 


$66,188.29 

50,875.27 

15,313.02 

94.71 
2,873.69 
3,476.67 
235.48 
197.00 

42.45 
204.64 
434.28 
191.03 
523.36 


1,177.45 
458.00 
722.25 

1,561.37 

333.25 
216.13 
297.17 
200.00 
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25.00 
948.82 
867.52 


$17,050.20 

7,879.30 

9,170.90 

50.00 
871.00 
1,916.30 
358.10 
288.15 

73.44 
256.13 
465.73 
273.60 

36.91 


261.98 
281.00 
510.92 
390.91 

1,114.38 
553.78 

46.08 
480.50 

34.75 

71.62 
469.59 
366.03 


$109,498.65 

81,749.65 

27,749.00 

214.04 
3,687.60 
5,755.18 
245.67 
347.54 

315.43 
322.42 
884.79 
408.30 
381.14 


1,116.81 
668.19 
320.73 

3,787.82 

1,167.68 
157.88 
473.34 
861.81 

121.85 
296.48 
1,363.94 


$71,836.45 
25,800.29 
46,036.16 

231.32 
4,286.42 
5,936.29 
1,952.34 

596.28 

903.10 
522.13 
5,355.26 
2,091.40 
1,426.64 


1,394.24 
1,146.16 
1,072.34 
1,668.14 

7,626.69 
1,797.20 
1,110.66 
1,435.49 
971.42 

165.98 
2,134.52 
2,212.14 


$4,972,795.05 

3,210,697.96 

1,762,097.09 

19,514.40 
239,237.60 
210,859.10 
62,551.20 
35,067.64 

20,378.00 
20,288.00 
97,527.33 
78,203.87 
47,340.00 


63,921.69 
43,019.94 
42,070.19 
139,018.44 

261,865.89 
47,503.62 
56',632'.28 
59,166.67 
59,734.25 

16,921.19 
79,396.75 
61,879.04 


$475,958.54 
257,058.54 
218,900.00 


31,500.00 
25,425.00 
15,400.00 
10,000.00 

3,600.00 
17,800.00 
10,800.00 


6,300.00 
3,000.00 
27,300.00 

31 575 00 
6,600.00 

7,200.00 
7,100.00 


10,100.00 
5,200.00 


$9,473.34 

2,141.45 

7,331.89 

1.70 
550.00 
710.65 
450.00 
237.23 

71.90 
108.86 
475.00 
221.02 

42.55 


109.68 
252.00 
262.18 
615.74 

1,310.88 
338.28 
480.00 

250.00 


364.22 
480.00 



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4,330.42 
3,558.98 
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32,897.47 
2,416.22 
1,625.50 
3,422.15 
5,486.65 

2,170.23 
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206,265.72 
112,254.45 

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1,194.87 

852.65 
1,095.25 
2,848.65 
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4,581.51 
2,016.78 
3,064.27 
16,897.88 

2,430.52 
1,560.02 
4,463.15 
2,113.97 

517.97 
5,552.44 
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49,518.15 

37,950.50 

483.19 
22,064.05 
20,469.74 
11,866.24 
13,100.50 

6,836.43 
9,131.53 
30,701.48 
23,612.90 
9,812.99 


7,393.21 
10,105.38 
12,941.06 
41,228.21 

19,043.86 
12,119.15 
18,909.30 
16,907.59 
14,006.55 

3,026.04 
17,056.31 
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II 



Maryland State Department of Education 



223 







CT> • 
OO 


. . . . . 


OS 


• OO -co • 

• OO • o • 

CO 


co 




3,629 
1 ,653 


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— 
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3,442 


cm r-- • oo r~ 

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CO — < 




• CO • • 
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11089 






7,288 
58 
221 

3,522 






9,981 






7,145 

88 
112 

2,636 



co co o. co • 



o> oo • • — « o «o 
oo co • — < ■ oo tn co 
oo o >o lOW- 



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224 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Enrollment in Maryland County Junior, Junior-Senior and Senior High 



County 
High School 


Total 
Enrollment 


Cere 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


M athe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 




3,541 


3,355 


136 


129 


3,397 


3,225 


3,104 


2,910 


3,019 


2,703 


2,714 
98 


2,435 


192 


311 


i 


ni/itnnm <5r Tr 


98 


105 






98 


105 


98 


105 


98 


99 


105 






Q 





142 


103 






142 


103 


142 


103 


133 


98 


128 


87 






^ 


Vnrt Will <Jr Tr 


1,001 


943 






995 


942 


905 


825 


842 


760 


803 


650 


51 


83 


e 





784 


721 






782 


721 


683 


608 


601 


564 


562 


492 


58 


110 


C 





275 


322 






275 


322 


247 


302 


237 


266 


237 


234 


26 


33 


7 




89 


103 


38 


42 


51 


61 


51 


61 


85 


83 


78 


83 









Pontml Qr Tr 


278 


247 


31 


27 


247 


220 


231 


203 


213 


187 


219 


194 


30 


37 


Q 


RpqH <ir Tr 


483 


495 


15 


14 


468 


481 


408 


433 


438 


349 


233 


302 


27 


48 


10 




111 


104 


33 


37 


78 


67 


78 


67 


111 


104 


111 


104 






11 




88 


70 






88 


70 


88 


70 


88 


70 


88 


70 






12 


Beall Elem.-Jr 


132 


95 


19 


9 


113 


86 


113 


86 


113 


86 


113 


86 






1 Q 


f„ C- Tr ICrA ~S 


60 


47 






60 


47 


60 


47 


60 


37 


44 


28 






14 


A A 


3 ,047 


3 ,107 


1 ,213 


1 ,166 


1 ,804 


1 ,940 


1 ,408 


1 ,625 


2 ,069 


2 ,070 


2 ,204 


2 ,244 


82 


106 


1 n 
10 




477 


520 






477 


520 


302 


462 


221 


220 


287 


294 


24 


37 


16 




95 


95 






95 


95 


95 


95 


93 


82 


78 


67 


4 


1 ® 


1 7 




417 


459 






416 


458 


412 


454 


273 


260 


300 


271 


47 


56 


] g 




142 


162 






142 


162 


131 


136 


117 


132 


108 


122 






1 




311 


315 


3ii 


3i5 










124 


148 


124 


148 






20 




425 


435 






425 


435 


425 


435 


422 


435 


425 


435 






1 




173 


158 


130 


115 


43 


43 


43 


43 


110 


95 


173 


158 






22 




133 


95 


133 


95 










133 


95 


133 


95 






no 
zo 




271 


255 


271 


255 










171 


160 


171 


160 






01 

-4 


> t ney n. nates or. -jr. iloi.; 


5S6 


597 


351 


370 


206 


227 






388 


427 


388 


478 


'7 


7 


OR 
ZD 


uia ^ on way tiiem.-jr. ^oi.; 


17 


16 


17 


16 










17 


16 


17 


16 










6,188 
763 


6,327 


4,363 


4,440 


1 ,820 


1 ,886 


1 ,791 


1,866 


5,716 


5,529 
619 


5,471 


5,127 


228 


276 


27 


pQtnncirillo Qr Tr 


774 


419 


436 


343 


338 


336 


332 


671 


618 


565 


76 


91 


96 


\filfnrrl Mill Tr 


406 


409 


324 


320 


82 


89 


81 


88 


402 


384 


367 


348 


4 


17 


29 




274 


292 


178 


187 


96 


105 


91 


107 


234 


220 


245 


225 


13 


23 


30 




169 


153 


88 


93 


81 


60 


81 


60 


161 


120 


113 


107 




49 


31 




516 


619 


195 


209 


318 


410 


311 


403 


395 


408 


435 


386 


37 


61 


TV , t , ,J 1 K Q T 


803 


778 


560 


563 


242 


215 


235 


211 


783 


724 


733 


622 


39 


35 


"XI 
o.J 




806 


740 


393 


378 


413 


361 


411 


358 


701 


597 


605 


482 


52 


56 


34 


Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 


424 


461 


279 


288 


145 


173 


145 


172 


342 


356 


329 


311 


7 


E 



35 


Fifth District Jr 


38 


45 


38 


45 










38 


45 


38 


45 






00 


Sixth District Jr 


44 


38 


44 


38 










44 


38 


44 


38 






37 




41 


46 


41 


46 










41 


46 


41 


46 






QQ 

oo 




481 


442 


481 


442 










481 


442 


481 


442 






39 


r\, a * „ ~- T- 


101 


89 


101 


89 










101 


89 


101 


89 








Stemmers Run Jr 


663 


677 


663 


677 










663 


677 


663 


677 






A 1 
•4 1 


8 Elem. Schools with Jr. 7th . 


212 


213 


212 


213 










212 


213 


212 


213 






42 


Banneker Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 


68 


74 


45 


56 


23 


is 


23 


18 


68 


74 


68 


74 






43 


Carver Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 


126 


159 


96 


117 


30 


42 


30 


42 


126 


159 


126 


159 






44 


Sollers Point Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . . 


237 


301 


190 


226 


47 


75 


47 


75 


237 


301 


236 


281 






45 


T> T7M T_ \ 


16 


17 


16 


17 










16 


17 


16 


17 






40 




405 


434 


121 


92 


283 


338 


277 


331 


326 


334 


334 


302 


18 


48 


47 




235 


230 


121 


92 


113 


135 


113 


135 


208 


184 


190 


155 


18 


48 


48 


T 1 1 O _ T , 1 \ 


170 


204 






170 


203 


164 


196 


118 


150 


144 


147 






49 




667 


629 


395 


348 


270 


281 


307 


319 


628 


579 


556 


531 


20 


38 


50 




139 


116 


82 


67 


57 


49 


57 


49 


117 


97 


100 


85 


3 


7 


51 




138 


146 


98 


100 


39 


46 


44 


60 


131 


127 


117 


132 


11 


11 


52 


Preston Sr.-Jr 


75 


58 


48 


39 


26 


19 


44 


28 


74 


58 


58 


49 


4 


10 


53 




120 


139 


69 


59 


51 


80 


51 


80 


112 


128 


101 


110 


2 


10 


54 


Ridgely Sr.-Jr 


44 


41 


21 


19 


23 


22 


23 


22 


43 


40 


44 


41 






55 




151 


129 


77 


64 


74 


65 


88 


80 


151 


129 


136 


114 






56 




1,283 


1 362 






1 283 


1 ,362 


1 278 


1 ,355 


1 247 


1 263 


1 038 


1 067 


19 


40 


57 


Taneytown Sr.-Jr 


117 


127 






'll7 


127 


'll7 


*127 


*117 


'll8 


'lOO 


99 
112 


5 


10 


58 




147 


161 






147 


161 


147 


161 


144 


139 


121 






59 


Manchester Sr.-Jr 


117 


1 12 






117 


112 


117 


112 


115 


95 


98 


91 


14 




60 




412 


452 






412 


452 


410 


449 


393 


428 


303 


356 


30 


61 




88 


80 






88 


80 


85 


76 


80 


73 


81 


73 






62 


New Windsor Sr.-Jr 


84 


83 






84 


83 


84 


83 


81 


79 


66 


65 






63 


Elmer Wolfe Sr -Jr 


90 


92 






90 


92 


90 


92 


89 


89 


68 
101 


67 






64 


Mount Airy Sr.-Jr 


119 


154 






119 


154 


119 


154 


119 


141 


117 






65 




43 


43 






43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 






66 


Robert Moton Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 


66 


58 






66 


58 


66 


58 


66 


58 


57 


44 






07 


Cecil 


1,024 

68 


1,007 


121 


136 


901 


869 


881 


867 


920 


896 


932 


891 


10 


29 


OS 


Cecilton Sr.-Jr 


75 






68 


75 


68 


75 


68 


75 


68 


75 






69 


Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 


82 


63 






82 


63 


82 


63 


69 


51 


68 
251 


47 


io 




70 


Elkton Sr.-Jr 


306 


279 






306 


278 


294 


290 


271 


244 


217 


29 


71 


North East 8r.-Jr 


166 


173 






166 


173 


166 


173 


162 


159 


162 


161 






72 




138 


160 


101 


lis 


35 


41 


36 


41 


98 


116 


138 


159 






73 




82 


90 


20 


18 


62 


72 


57 


58 


80 


84 


75 


68 
50 






74 


Calvert Sr.-Jr 


59 


53 






59 


53 


59 


53 


58 


53 


58 






75 




36 


32 






36 


32 


36 


32 


36 


32 


36 
76 


32 






76 


Carver Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 


87 


82 






87 


82 


83 


82 


78 


82 


82 







Maryland State Department of Education 225 



Schools By Subject, Excluding Duplicates, for Year Ending June 30, 1950 





1 Agriculture | 


Industrial 


Home Economics. 


Business 


Physical 


Art-Arts 


French 


Spanish 1 






Subjects 


Education ■ Music 


and Crafts 




I Gen. 1 Voc. I 


Arts 1 Edu. 


Gen. 1 Voc 









B 


G 


B 


G 


B* 


1 B 


1 B 


1 G 


1 Bt 


B 


1 G 


1 G * 


| B 


1 G 


1 B 


1 G 


B 


G 


B 


1 


1 


31 


97 


60 


79 21 


274 1 ,428 


3 


155 


11 


1 ,461 


1 26S 


896 


1 ,117 


2,730 2,339 2,628 2,513 1,127 


1,031 
•• 


2 












36 










51 


51 






9$ 


105 8< 


) 103 


3 












43 


73 








45 


41 






I 142 103 128 101 ! 




4 






24 


21 


21 


19 


389 




76 




388 


56 


119 


305 


771 68( 


) 790 637 44S 


411 


5 


H 


22 


36 


58 




39 


416 








314 


39 


442 


364 584 432 48f 


432 304 


269 


g 


2 


25 








104 


52 








129 


47 


67 


138 210 222 240 285 




7 














85 








83 




1£ 


25 8C 


7S 


71 


99! .. 




g 


g 


26 










154 








140 




103 


79 j 256 


208 204 218 




9 




24 








33 


259 


3 


79 


11 


311 


31 


147 


206 247 


236 229 322 191 


219 


10 






























111 


104 111 


104 




1 1 






























8S 


70 88 


70 70 


46 


12 






























132 


95 


132 


95 113 


86 


1 3 






























11 


6 


60 


47 




14 


152 


176 


35 


74 


19 


128 


1 ,778 




441 




1 ,933 


{415 


184 


640 


2 ,783 


2,785 


1,857 2, 09C 


1.357 


1,147 


15 


53 


78 










137 




234 




217 60 


45 


220 


447 


478 


103 


257 70 


75 


16 












57 


23 








27 


58 


16 


31 


91 


61 










17 


63 


55 


22 


42 






157 




75 




63 105 


81 


264 


413 


445 


62 


89 


49 


71 


18 


fj 


9 








48 


101 








87 


66 


29 


48 


132 


156 


129 


159 19 


19 


19 














311 








315 








311 


315 311 


315 311 


315 


20 














425 








435 








421 


414 425 


435 425 


435 


21 














173 








158 








173 158 173 


15S 


67 


52 


22 














133 








95 








133 


95 










23 














271 








255 










255 


271 


255 


171 


160 


24 


30 


34 


13 


32 


19 


23 


47 




132 




281 


{126 


13 


77 


W, 


392 


352 


406 


228 


4 


25 






























17 


16 


17 


16 


17 


16 


26 


239 


233 


191 


157 


40 


68 


3,689 


3 


196 




3,223 


352 


728 


1 .422 


6,123 


6,203 4,741 


5 ,069 3 ,358 


3 477 


27 


23 


23 


34 


30 






562 


2 


17 




444 


69 


164 


246 


754 


746 


480 


505 


302 


317 


2v 


4 


7 


21 


5 






262 








255 


50 


62 


406 


409 


336 


373 


331 


342 


29 


21 


18 






40 


22 


131 








112 38 


34 


78 


2741 292 


188 210 


147 


147 


30 


25 


12 








46 


70 




52 




92 1 14 


16 


41 


169 


153 


109 


112 


95 


108 


31 


37 


60 


85 


94 






341 




46 




254 


138 


121 


286 


507 


605 


219 


317 


225 


276 


32 


36 


19 










477 








366 


67 


96 


167 


782 


753 


596 


604 


601 


578 


33 


30 


45 


51 


28 






538 




43 




347 


26 


181 


280 


800 


715 


492 


517 


377 


351 


34 


21 


16 










265 


1 


38 




319 




64 


161 


424 


447 


294 


340 165 


159 


35 














38 








45 








38 


45 


38 


45 






36 














44 








22 








44 


38 


44 


38 






37 














41 








46 








41 


46 


41 


36 






38 














232 








194 








463 


432 


481 


442 


249 


248 


39 














68 








57 








101 


89 


101 89 


33 


32 


40 














292 








294 








663 


677 


663 


677 


371 


383 


4 1 






























212 


213 


212 


213 


212 


213 


42 














68 








74 








68 


74 


68 


74 


9 


16 


43 














91 








114 








124 


151 


126 


159 


35 


45 


44 


42 


33 










169 








188 




2 


101 
1U1 


237 


301 


237 


301 


190 


245 


45 






























16 


17 


16 


17 


16 


17 


46 


9 


13 






16 


68 


263 








215 


123 


13 


50 


390 


401 


173 


192 


15 


11 


47 


g 


13 








27 


173 








135 


16 


13 


50 


221 


202 


173 


192 






48 










16 


41 


90 








80 


107 






169 


199 






i5 


11 


40 


g 


14 






21 


36 


402 








372 


22 


76 


104 


666 


616 


481 


480 


104 


91 


5 ( i 


3 


g 










126 








75 




39 


29 


139 


113 


92 


116 






51 


g 


g 










105 








114 




18 


50 


137 


144 


105 


110 






52 






















30 








75 


58 


38 


31 


22 


ig 


5 ] 














82 








59 


22 


19 


25 


120 


136 


95 


108 


33 


31 


54 










21 




11 
















44 


36 






12 


9 


55 












36 


78 








94 








151 


129 


151 


115 


37 


35 


56 


46 


fiQ 

oy 






19 


27 


1,137 


19 
XL 


13 


15 


1,079 


44 




346 


1,265 


1,319 


1,082 


1,205 


285 


330 


57 














114 








So 


32 


27 


27 


117 


124 


117 


127 






58 


4 


12 










123 








123 




34 
01 


57 


144 


146 
108 


128 


112 






59 


U 


10 










105 








86 




9ti 


37 


116 


92 


97 






60 


16 


21 










353 




10 




353 


12 


00 

yy 


92 


398 


443 


292 


380 


272 


318 


61 


5 


g 










73 


19 




1 K 
10 


59 




91 

i. l 


20 


SS 


80 


75 


76 






,,_> 


2 


■ 












82 








79 




22 


24 


84 


83 


76 
90 


83 






63 














76 








72 




26 


27 


90 


89 


86 






64 


g 


14 










102 








121 




27 


48 


119 


145 


103 


143 






H5 














43 








43 








43 


43 


43 


43 






66 










19 


27 


66 








58 




9 


14 


66 


58 


66 


58 


13 


12 


67 


10 


20 


23 


35 


9 




898 


42 




15 


750 


125 


114 


178 


787 


691 


820 


840 






68 


3 


5 










68 








75 








68 


69 


58 


75 






69 
70 














75 


10 






49 




13 


13 


82 


63 


56 


42 










9 


8 






278 






15 


177 


52 


65 


77 


274 


196 


225 


200 






71 






5 


7 






144 








151 




22 


53 


149 


141 


142 


142 






72 






9 


20 






118 








118 


30 






101 


118 


102 


1471 . . 




73 


6 


5 










75 








73 


15 


14 


35 






75 


86 






74 


1 


10 










26 








53 








26 


22 


39 


34 






75 














36 


32 


















36 


32 






76 










9 




78 








54 


28 






87 


82 


87 


82 







226 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment in Maryland County Junior, Junior-Senior, and 



CoUNTT 

High School 



Total 










Social 
















Enrollment i 


Core 


English 


Studies 




Science 


Mathe- 


Latin 
























matics 






B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 



B 


G 


B 


G 


n 1 

B 1 


G 


B 


G 


712 


772 


363 


361 


348 


410 


348 


40< 


) 


490 


524 


577 


583 


23 


27 


55 


47 






55 


46 


55 


45 


52 


35 


46 


35 






212 


206 


119 


88 


92 


118 


92 


118 


163 


144 


145 


117 


23 


27 


25 


32 






25 


32 


25 


32 


25 


32 


25 


32 




41 


31| 


22 


14 


19 


17 


19 


17 


19 


17 


22 


14 






116 


113 


116 


113 












26 


37 


116 


113 






46 


43 






46 


43 


46 


43 


46 


43 


46 


43 






55 


78 






55 


78 


55 


78 


50 


66 


44 


56 






113 


159 


57 


83 


56 


76 


56 


76 


109 


150 


84 


110 






49 


63 


49 


63 
















49 


63 






769 


776 


387 


343 


381 


433 


311 


416 


685 


703 


723 


693 


12 


21 


194 


185 






194 


185 


156 


171 


156 


133 


191 


178 


9 


11 


46 


40 


30 


20 


16 


20 


26 


38 


46 


40 


46 


40 






40 


37 


28 


25 


12 


12 


10 


6 


37 


32 


40 


36 


3 


10 


27 


38 


19 


16 


8 


22 


8 


22 


27 


33 


23 


30 






13 


13 


5 


1 


8 


12 


13 


18 


13 


13 


13 


13 






103 


99 


78 


56 


24 


43 


26 


43 


98 


88 


84 


79 






167 


172 


167 


172 












167 


172 


167 


172 






179 


192 


60 


53 


119 


139 


72 


118 


141 


192 


159 


145 






1,914 


1,973 


1 ,085 


996 


829 


977 


765 


92 




1,048 


915 


1,435 


1,363 


148 


220 


547 


573 


186 


166 


361 


407 


361 


407 


423 


411 


309 


284 


95 


112 


215 


236 


116 


104 


99 


132 


79 


131 


192 


81 


182 


176 


5 


43 


80 


78 


50 


49 


30 


29 


30 


29 


29 


29 


70 


69 


22 


22 


216 


216 


144 


109 


72 


107 


68 


91 


113 


91 
108 


161 


135 


7 


30 


188 


215 


80 


77 


108 


138 


68 


101 


103 


94 


90 


19 


13 


103 


116 


48 


43 


55 


73 


55 


73 


55 


73 


92 


107 






369 


350 


369 


350 








' 








369 


350 






53 


44 


38 


36 


15 


8 


is 




3 


15 


8 


53 


44 






143 


145 


54 


62 


89 


83 


89 


83 


118 


114 


105 


108 






687 


6 ^ 
93 


687 


689 












359 


386 


544 


517 


15 


31 


103 


103 


93 












43 


56 


87 


72 






125 


150 


125 


150 












63 


83 


94 


104 






96 


66 


96 


66 












57 


35 


78 


56 






291 


309 


291 


309 












166 


177 


213 


214 


15 


31 


72 


71 


72 


71 












30 


35 


72 


71 






1,375 
99 


1,4 X 

89 


926 


912 


449 


496 


453 


493 


718 


706 


1,228 


1,239 


32 


50 


72 


63 


27 


26 


27 


26 


50 


51 


99 


89 






195 


215 


134 


135 


61 


80 


61 


75 


92 


85 


159 


163 


3 


8 


359 


344 


223 


201 


136 


143 


132 


139 


212 


176 


317 


295 


9 


21 


132 


126 


94 


76 


38 


50 


37 


50 


63 


77 


131 


124 






45 


41 


27 


29 


18 


12 


18 


12 


24 


19 


45 


41 






74 


75 


52 


59 


22 


16 


22 


1 


6 


27 


21 


61 
75 


71 






89 


121 


63 


80 


26 


41 


24 


41 


46 


69 


108 




21 


197 


205 


128 


134 


69 


71 


69 


65 


86 


80 


181 


183 


20 


96 


104 


68 


73 


28 


31 


39 


43 


29 


40 


95 


103 






89 


88 


65 


62 


24 


26 


24 


2 


5 


89 


88 


65 


62 






748 


698 


522 


452 


224 


241 


218 


236 


589 


529 


610 


545 


18 


25 


167 


149 


116 


97 


51 


52 


48 


48 


163 


129 


131 


107 


12 


10 


178 


202 


134 


141 


44 


61 


44 


6 


] 


118 


139 


146 


158 


2 


6 


129 


108 


98 


73 


31 


35 


31 


35 


123 


98 


118 


99 






114 


79 


60 


32 


54 


47 


54 


47 


111 


71 


87 


62 


4 


9 


160 


160 


114 


109 


44 


46 


41 


4 


B 


74 


92 


128 


119 






439 


438 


275 


276 


162 


160 


162 


159 


408 


430 


381 


392 


22 


38 


23 


26 






23 


26 


23 


26 


23 


26 


23 


26 






44 


44 


28 


29 


16 


15 


16 


15 


44 


44 


38 


43 


4 


7 


183 


165 


106 


103 


76 


60 


76 


59 


153 


157 


132 


120 


15 


19 


64 


sr 


49 


38 


14 


19 


14 


19 


63 


57 


63 


57 


3 


12 


125 


146 


92 


106 


33 


40 


33 


40 


125 


146 


125 


146 






4 ,087 




1 ,586 


1 ,534 


2 .481 


- ,04- 


2 002 


2,056 


2 808 


2 517 


3,305 


2,852 


304 


455 


576 


531 


564 


527 


398 


365 


'416 


'314 


425 


248 


70 


89 


612 


645 






605 


642 


474 


497 


458 


378 


358 


176 


62 


87 


107 


114 


25 


27 


82 


87 


62 


6 




73 


85 


79 


83 




29 


332 


370 


174 


173 


158 


197 


132 


163 


242 


269 


252 


234 


17 


159 


162 


78 


69 


80 


93 


65 


79 


136 


122 


124 


123 


28 


33 


252 


252 


125 


107 


127 


145 


103 


9 




189 


186 


213 


169 


117 

628 


126 


45 
628 


37 


72 


89 


55 


75 


110 


100 


82 


81 




122 


654 


654 












323 


289 


628 


654 


76 


498 


470 




498 


470 


498 


470 


463 


419 


498 


470 


25 


46 
31 


336 


284 


234 


198 


102 


86 


102 


8 




179 


139 


336 


284 


17 


170 


147 


116 


104 


54 


43 


54 


43 


109 


76 


170 


147 


9 


18 


300 


328 


161 


165 


139 


163 


59 


111 


110 


140 


140 


183 







1 Charles 

2 Lackey Sr 

3 La Plata Sr.-Jr 

4 Nanjemoy Jr 

5 Glasva Jr 

6 Indian Head Jr 

7 Hughesville Jr 

8 Pomonkey Sr. (Col.) 

9 Bel Alton Sr.-Jr. (Col) 

10 Pomonkey Jr. (Col.) 

11 Dorchester 

12 Cambridge Sr.-Jr 

13 East New Market Sr.-Jr. . . 

14 Vienna Sr.-Jr 

15 Crapo Sr.-Jr 

16 Hoopers Island Sr.-Jr 

17 Hurlock Sr.-Jr 

18 Cambridge Jr 

19 F.D. St. Clair Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 

20 Frederick f . . 

21 Frederick Sr.-Jr 

22 Middletown Sr.-Jr 

23 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 

24 Thunnont Sr.-Jr 

25 Brunswick Sr.-Jr 

26 Walkersville Sr.-Jr 

27 Elm Street Jr 

28 Liberty Jr 

29 Lincoln Sr.-Jr. (CoL) 

30 Garrett 

31 Friendsville Sr.-Jr 

32 Grantsville Sr.-Jr 

33 Accident Sr.-Jr 

34 Oakland Sr.-Jr 

35 Kitzmiller Sr.-Jr 

36 Harford 

37 Old Post Road Sr.-Jr 

38 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

39 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 

40 Jarrettsville Sr.-Jr 

41 Slate Ridge Sr.-Jr 

42 Highland Sr.-Jr 

43 Dublin Sr.-Jr 

44 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

45 Bel Air Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 



47 Howard 

48 Elkridge Sr.-Jr 

49 Ellicott City Sr.-Jr . . 

50 Lisbon Sr -Jr 

51 Clarksville Sr.-Jr. . . . 

52 Harriet Tubman Sr- Jr. (Col.) 



53 Kent 



Millington Sr.-Jr 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Chestertown Sr.-Jr. . . 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . 



59 Montgomery 

60 Betheada-Chevy Chase Sr. . 

61 Montgomery Blair Sr 

62 Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

63 Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr. 

64 Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

65 Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr 

66 Damascus Sr.-Jr 

67 Leland Jr 

68 Takoma Park Jr 

69 Montgomery Hills Jr 

70 Kensington Jr 

71 Lincoln Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 



Maryland State Department of Education 227 



Senior High Schools By Subject, Excluding Duplicates, for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


1 Bus 


iness 
jeets 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen 


1 

! Voc. 


Arts 


1 

1 Edu 


Gen. 


1 

! Voc 


1 Sue 

1 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B* 


B 


B 


G 


Bt 


B 


G 


GJ 


g 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




27 


13 






94 




265 . . 


14 




409 


144 


129 


197 


608 


660 


541 


631 


J 

8C 


89 


2 


27 


13 


















33 




25 


40 


50 


44 


45 


46 






3 














123 




14 




87 


60 


86 


114 


211 


206 


111 


120 




































25 


32 










5 










*9 












17 












41 


31 


22 


ii 


g 














1 1 R 








US 








116 


US 


116 


112 






7 










18 












43 








46 


43 


12 


21 


is 


18 


g 
























56 


ii 


22 






55 


78 






9 










34 












68 


28 


7 


21 


lii 


159 


112 


159 


24 


42 


10 










33 












48 








49 


63 


49 


63 


16 


15 


11 


19 


12 






60 


160 


307 


8 




6 


414 


40 


28 


65 


751 


727 


559 


539 


398 


387 


12 


17 


5 








39 


141 








148 




6 


36 


190 


162 


136 


143 


156 


159 


13 












34 


12 


g 






32 








46 


40 










14 














W 








37 








40 


35 


21 


15 






15 


























4 


8 


27 


33 










16 










































17 


2 


7 








29 


58 








64 




is 


21 


102 


98 


87 


8? 


75 


56 


18 






























167 


172 


167 


172 


167 


172 


19 










60 


58 


OO 






6 


133 


40 






179 


187 


148 


127 






20 


33 


122 








273 


1 078 
1 ,Vt o 


1Q 
13 






1,192 


53 


275 


450 


1,883 


1,884 


1,324 


1,418 


748 


665 


21 


21 


43 








103 


Q95 








295 




173 


275 


521 


535 


192 


170 


173 


171 


22 


1 


9/1 








57 










173 


22 


3 


16 


215 


232 


144 


195 






23 












42 


60 








57 








80 


78 


80 


78 




38 


24 


2 


31 








35 


110 








106 




19 


43 


213 


207 


128 


158 


109 


25 


2 


5 










1fiQ 

ioy 








157 




54 


95 


188 


177 


158 


191 






26 


7 


19 








36 


48 








83 








101 


116 


94 


113 


82 


93 
350 


27 














185 








176 








369 


350 


369 


350 


369 


28 














53 








44 








53 


44 


53 


44 




i3 


29 














128 








101 


31 


26 


21 


143 


145 


106 


119 


is 


30 


12 


26 








242 


290 








353 


205 


114 


159 


683 


663 


552 


615 


318 


234 


31 












67 


28 








39 


39 






103 


85 


88 


93 


32 


15 


32 


5 


18 








58 


R9 








67 


65 






125 


146 


124 


145 




ii 


33 












55 










26 


26 






93 


54 


66 


66 


38 


34 


7 


8 








62 


200 








174 


51 


65 


105 


290 


307 


202 


240 


189 


205 


35 






















47 


24 


49 


54 


72 


71 


72 


71 


59 




36 


59 


65 






246 


171 


797 




28 


9 


740 


293 


144 


222 


1 281 
99 


1 ,294 
89 


1 ,073 
99 


1,136 
89 


383 


395 


37 














RQ 
0» 








66 










63 


38 


12 


13 










113 








84 


48 


17 


56 


183 


186 


138 


167 


50 


39 


33 


90 






138 


55 


11U 








138 


30 


101 


133 


281 


267 


282 


272 


71 


73 


40 


6 


13 






70 


54 










45 


64 






132 


125 


128 


123 


66 


52 


41 




10 










18 








29 








45 


41 


45 


41 






42 










38 


36 


• • 








42 


33 






73 


74 


52 


59 






43 












26 


63 








52 


69 






89 


121 


82 


102 




134 


44 














160 




28 




146 


23 


'8 


23 


194 


199 


145 


173 


128 


45 














75 








76 








96 


104 


13 


22 


68 


73 


46 














89 








62 


26 


is 


io 


89 


88 


89 


88 






47 


14 


16 






113 


138 


225 


225 






281 


145 


148 


203 


742 


688 


659 


632 


312 


235 


48 
49 


10 












108 








63 


27 


56 


54 


166 


146 


139 


124 


116 


97 


11 










117 








92 


28 


39 


81 


176 


201 


147 


196 


50 


46 


50 


4 


5 






45 


39 










46 


21 


11 


9 


129 


108 


129 


108 


39 


27 


51 










32 


48 










35 


10 


11 


17 


111 


73 


103 


70 


60 


32 


52 










36 


51 










45 


59 


31 


42 


160 


160 


141 


134 


47 


33 


53 






5 


6 


31 


55 


212 








201 


58 


35 


40 


434 


435 


361 


394 


195 


166 


54 






























23 


26 


17 


26 






55 














40 








29 


'8 






44 


44 


37 


44 






56 
57 






5 


6 






111 








67 


3 


35 


40 


178 


162 


132 


122 


156 


127 














61 








38 


7 






64 


57 


50 


56 






58 










31 


55 










67 


40 






125 


146 


125 


146 


39 


39 


59 


105 


208 


233 


291 


50 


225 


2,794 


166 


f286 


18 


2,117 


353 


420 


882 


3,853 


3,793 


2,011 


2,490 


1,205 


1,331 


60 


44 


89 
45 


128 


153 






327 


59 


+9R 
| 40 


18 


126 


46 


144 


212 


469 


456 


110 


148 


35 


71 


61 


26 


93 


116 






289 


6 


U13 




167 


25 


162 


343 


537 


561 


76 


124 


46 


104 


62 


11 


13 






41 


43 


88 








48 


41 


12 


97 


106 


109 


48 


74 


23 


46 


63 




10 


1 


2 






223 




t94 




212 


32 


26 


111 


308 


329 


209 


357 


174 


182 


64 


8 


14 


11 


20 




48 


136 


97 








47 


15 


17 


144 


143 


106 


116 




65 


i 










34 


173 








105 


45 


30 


74 


252 


248 


129 


164 


143 


124 


66 


i 






9 


38 


83 








41 


60 


9 


48 


116 


124 


4 


1 


20 


7 


67 














400 








408 








627 


641 


606 


640 


235 


253 


68 














476 


*4 






437 








497 


470 


260 


347 


150 


131 


69 
70 














336 








284 








335 


283 


183 


241 


183 


237 


15 


30 










101 








92 








170 


147 


79 


76 


42 


32 


71 








62 


162 




53 




197 


57 


22 


50 


292 


282 


201 


202 


145 


144 



228 Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment in Maryland County Junior, Junior-Senior, and 



County 
High School 



Total 










Social 














Enrollment 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 


Latin 






















matics 






B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


5 ,344^ ,350 


3,468 


3,317 


1,869 


2,032 


1,864 1,989 


3 ,505^ ,329 


4 ,417 


4 149 


379 


365 


540 


541 


184 


181 


355 


358 


343 


351 


273 


296 


344 


26C 


107 


90 


251 


260 


173 


168 


78 


92 


78 


91 


100 


82 


195 


201 


15 


16 


177 


174 


101 


100 


76 


74 


69 


86 


98 


76 


173 


148 






244 


279 


148 


159 


96 


120 


116 


126 


227 


248 


195 


204 






194 


198 


111 


119 


83 


79 


83 


79 


187 


170 


140 


135 






332 


318 


214 


205 


119 


113 


118 


113 


129 


125 


276 


223 


34 


24 


548 


541 


273 


251 


272 


290 


271 


287 


245 


250 


423 


416 


88 


100 


399 


389 


231 


194 


168 


195 


170 


161 


178 


188 


182 


238 


72 


68 


432 


417 


177 


146 


254 


271 


248 


269 


377 


294 


288 


241 


20 


16 


485 


454 


294 


282 


188 


173 


189 


159 


229 


185 


379 


321 


43 


51 


404 


374 


404 


374 










404 


374 


404 


374 






172 


163 


172 


163 










172 


163 


172 


163 






104 


112 


104 


112 










216 


104 


216 


104 






370 


326 


370 


326 










370 


326 


370 


326 






224 


296 


131 


146 


93 


150 


93 


150 


103 


205 


199 


294 






156 


181 


69 


64 


87 


117 


86 


117 


109 


138 


149 


174 






51 


51 


51 


51 










8 


13 


51 


51 






52 


51 


52 


51 










52 


51 


52 


51 






140 


149 


140 


149 










28 


41 


140 


149 






69 


76 


69 


76 














69 


76 






437 


524 


123 


123 


313 


401 


313 


400 


426 


484 


385 


436 






103 


114 


38 


31 


65 


83 


65 


83 


102 


99 


88 


77 






164 


181 


85 


92 


78 


89 


78 


88 


154 


157 


129 


147 






62 


90 






62 


90 


62 


90 


62 


89 


60 


73 






108 


139 






108 


139 


108 


139 


108 


139 


108 


139 






452 


476 






452 


475 


451 


471 


365 


355 


395 


409 


28 


35 


131 


134 






131 


134 


130 


130 


131 


114 


100 


107 


3 


6 


200 


203 






200 


202 


200 


202 


165 


153 


174 


163 


25 


29 


81 


105 






81 


105 


81 


105 


54 


54 


81 


105 






40 


34 






40 


34 


40 


34 


15 


34 


40 


34 






655 


651 


460 


422 


195 


229 


241 


254 


511 


499 


495 


486 






160 


150 


113 


83 


47 


67 


57 


67 


114 


110 


93 


83 






41 


66 


33 


46 


8 


20 


7 


16 


34 


56 


36 


52 






173 


152 


112 


100 


61 


52 


58 


44 


154 


134 


129 


109 






37 


29 


23 


10 


14 


19 


14 


19 


33 


25 


33 


25 






6 

159 


8 
154 


6 

120 


8 
107 


39 


47 


65 


70 


6 

112 


8 
102 


g 
133 


3 
131 






79 


92 


53 


68 


26 


24 


40 


38 


58 


64 


65 


78 






598 


643 


408 


421 


188 


220 


210 


227 


517 


531 


539 


546 


25 


55 


251 


315 


154 


204 


95 


109 


117 


116 


189 


242 


223 


251 


20 


37 


122 


115 


84 


77 


38 


38 


38 


38 


107 


83 


95 


87 


5 


18 


46 


39 


35 


26 


11 


13 


11 


13 


42 


32 


42 


34 






179 


174 


135 


114 


44 


60 


44 


60 


179 


174 


179 


174 






2,843 
596 


2,880 


199 


195 


2,644 


2,685 


2,355 


2,453 
460 


2,446 


2,298 


2 153 


2 051 


100 


241 


632 






596 


632 


365 


404 


339 


176 


100 


18 


56 


212 


224 






212 


224 


187 


198 


179 


163 


158 


140 


10 


25 


205 


201 


89 


68 


116 


133 


112 


121 


194 


189 


158 


155 


5 


17 


154 


189 


13 


24 


141 


165 


124 


162 


152 


181 


139 


142 






352 


329 






352 


329 


352 


329 


343 


289 


252 


261 


18 


4i 


192 


195 






192 


195 


182 


176 


165 


177 


138 


143 






393 


385 


38 


33 


355 


352 


353 


352 


324 


335 


393 


385 


i4 


28 


26 


26 


26 


26 










26 


26 


26 


26 






338 


351 






338 


35 i 


338 


351 


324 


313 


33fi 
ooo 


OOl 


14 


44 


316 


285 






316 


285 


316 


285 


295 


255 


OlO 


zoo 


21 


30 


59 


63 


33 


44 


26 


19 


26 


19 


40 


31 


KO 

o» 


RQ 
DO 






797 


992 






797 


992 


728 


907 


683 


831 


RQO 
0O» 


7QR 
/OD 


81 


115 


49 


64 






49 


64 


49 


62 


46 


61 


37 


51 






39 


50 






39 


50 


39 


50 


39 


50 


30 


43 


66 


94 


474 


586 






474 


586 


405 


503 


406 


461 


369 


384 






29 


24 






29 


24 


29 


24 


19 


14 


29 


24 






206 


268 






206 


268 


206 


268 


173 


245 


174 


234 


i5 


21 


654 


780 


467 


533 


187 


246 


186 


246 


535 


628 


582 


676 


5 


13 


83 


125 


60 


83 


23 


41 


23 


41 


78 


110 


68 


104 


5 


13 


123 


131 


75 


93 


48 


38 


48 


38 


90 


98 


103 


111 






132 


190 


94 


126 


38 


64 


38 


64 


70 


114 


102 


142 






67 


58 


46 


36 


21 


22 


20 


22 


65 


51 


60 


43 






153 


178 


96 


97 


57 


81 


57 


81 


136 


157 


153 


178 






34 


37 


34 


37 










34 


37 


34 


37 






62 


61 


62 


61 










62 


61 


62 


61 



































Prince George's 

Bladensburg Sr.-Jr 

Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr. . 

Surrattsville Sr.-Jr 

Laurel Sr.-Jr 

Gwvnn Park Sr.-Jr 

Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 

Hyattsville Sr.-Jr 

Mount Rainier Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Maryland Park Sr.-Jr. . . . 

Greenbelt Sr.-Jr 

Bladensburg Jr 

Hyattsville Jr 

Brentwood Jr 

Lyndon Hill Jr 

Douglass Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . 
Lakeland Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . . 

Westwood Jr. (Col.) 

Oxon Hill Jr. (Col.) 

Highland Park Jr. (Col.) . 
Lincoln Jr. (Col.) 

Queen Anne's 

Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

Centreville Sr.-Jr 

Stevensville Sr.-Jr 

Kennard Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . . 

St. Mart's 

Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 

Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

Banneker Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . 
Jarboesvile Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 

Somerset 

Washington Sr.-Jr 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 

Greenwood Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . 
Crisfield Sr-Jr. (Col.) . . . 

Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

Cordova Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 

Washington 

Hagerstown Sr 

Wiliiamsport Sr.-Jr 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

Hancock Sr.-Jr 

Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Washington Street Sr.-Jr. 

Maugansville Jr 

South Potomac Jr 

Woodland Way Jr 

North Street Sr.-Jr. (Col.) 

Wicomico 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

Pittsville Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Sr.-Jr 

Hebron Sr.-Jr 

Salisbury Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . . 

Worcester 

Pocomoke Sr-Jr , 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Buckingham Sr.-Jr 

Ocean City Sr.-Jr 

Worcester Sr.-Jr. (Col.) . . 
Stephen Long Jr. (Col.) . . 
Berlin Jr. (Col.) 



* Includes the following girls taking General Agriculture: Somerset, Washington Sr-Jr.— 21; Worcester, Snow Hill Sr.-Jr. 

—3. 

X Includes the following boys taking Vocational Home Economics: Anne Arundel, Wiley H. Bates Sr.-Jr. (Col.) — 13. 



Maryland State Department of Education 229 



Senior High Schools By Subject, Excluding Duplicates, for Year Ending June 30, 1950 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


1 

lEdu. 


Gen. 


Voc 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B* 


B 


B 


G 


Bt 


B 


G 


Gt 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




132 


121 


125 


110 


99 


162 


3,540 


822 


t34l 




2,715 


107 
6vi 


56; 


1,273 


5,058 


4,611 


3,44- 


I 3 ,65( 


) 2 ,39< 


t 1 ,965 


2 




60 


38 




■ ■ 


264 




10-: 




280 


AA 
4-1 


117 


286 


395 


387 


91 


m 


12' 


[ 80 


3 






13 


5 




44 


171 


62 






126 




49 


79 


25C 


251 


Itt 


156 


2'i 


12 


4 


31 


26 










138 








100 


48 

40 


15 


37 


176 


156 


101 


10C 


. 




5 


15 


29 


18 


14 






196 


53 






136 




59 


90 


241 


267 


181 


258 






g 


4 


6 




Ad 
40 


130 








119 




24 


62 


194 


183 


104 


135 






7 














264 








199 


41 


43 


92 


331 


290 


213 


243 


2ii 


195 


g 


9 


1 Q 

16 


30 
ou 


47 






27C 




+ 1 Aft 




321 




3{ 


132 


48( 


369 


238 


295 


20a 


186 


9 


31 


31 










237 




90 




258 




89 


172 


389 


293 


259 


223 


233 


209 


10 


27 
19 


6 










299 




t81 




305 




68 


192 


344 


312 


92 


153 


153 


67 


11 


16 










332 




42 




282 


39 


63 


131 


407 


351 


254 


291 


132 


107 


12 














404 


374 














404 


374 


404 


374 


404 


374 


13 














172 


163 














172 


163 


172 


163 


172 


163 


14 






























216 


104 


216 


104 


216 


104 


1,5 










• • 




370 


170 






156 








370 


326 


370 


326 


370 


326 


16 










99 


70 










91 


202 






224 


277 


178 


208 






17 














128 








151 








153 


181 


114 


136 






18 






























51 


51 


51 


51 


51 


51 


19 














25 








36 








52 


51 


52 


51 


27 


15 


20 














140 








155 








140 


149 


140 


149 






21 






























69 


76 


69 


76 


69 


76 


22 


31 


37 






65 


57 


300 








325 


96 


23 


121 


328 


380 


241 


268 






23 


11 


2 






65 


25 










75 




9 


67 


103 


114 










24 


12 


19 








QO 


138 








127 



y 


14 


45 


163 


176 


119 


127 






25 


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16 










54 








56 


1 K 

10 




9 


62 


90 


40 


41 






26 














108 








67 


79 










82 


100 






27 










































6 


4 






85 


99 


203 








295 


80 


39 


89 


385 


421 


335 


386 


28 


20 


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CO 

06 


06 










95 




7 


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131 


134 


104 


113 






29 


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• • 


178 








132 


42 


31 


57 


173 


182 


172 


184 






30 










22 


46 










50 


31 


1 


7 


81 


105 


59 


89 


13 


17 


31 














25 








18 
















15 


9 


32 










































38 


45 






88 


OU 


323 


3 






439 




124 


158 


607 


574 


449 


414 


76 


78 


33 


16 


22 






*88 


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75 




17 


46 


159 


126 


103 


63 






34 


3 


6 






















12 


29 


40 


63 


27 


35 






35 


19 


17 










170 








132 




81 


64 


170 


139 


75 


76 






36 


























14 


19 






23 


10 


23 


10 


37 










































38 














153 


3 






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159 


154 


142 


138 






39 






















91 








79 


92 


79 


92 


53 


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16 


11 






37 


95 


344 




24 




407 


86 


86 


153 


518 


540 


284 


323 






41 




7 








44 


175 








204 


00 


58 


89 


199 


241 


154 


205 






42 


6 


4 










86 








87 




28 


64 


94 


86 


84 


79 






43 










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46 


39 


46 


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37 


91 
61 


83 




94 




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45 






179 


174 










45 












■ 
1 
































68 


189 


61 


113 


so 

08 


440 


1,994 


87 


217 




1,890 


910 


106 


531 


2,802 


2,830 


2,128 
196 


2,365 


1 ,048 


1,059 


46 


21 


73 


61 


113 




50 


150 


4 


217 




224 


25 


79 


455 


566 


591 


271 


65 


82 


47 


5 


8 








97 


168 








171 




27 


76 


212 


221 


173 


204 






48 


3 


10 








AS 
00 


131 


83 






39 


AK 
40 






205 


201 


169 


176 


129 


110 


49 


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17 








CO 

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82 








93 


73 






154 


188 


138 


184 




50 


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199 


71 
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351 


328 


330 


320 






51 


15 


33 






58 


04 


186 








73 


91 
66 






188 


191 


132 


174 






52 












22 


357 








366 








392j 


385 


316 


334 


246 


222 


53 














26 








26 








26 


26 


26 


26 






54 












26 


312 








351 








338 


351 


296 


328 


296 


328 


55 












23 


293 








285 








31 1 j 


285 


293 


285 


293 


285 


56 


4 


ii 










59 








63 








59 


63 


59 


63 


19 


32 


57 






























1 












10 


10 


16 


23 




77 


552 








663 




73 


170 


587 1 


731 


470 


739 


268 


233 


58 


10 


10 


























49 


61 


44 


57 


45 


56 


59 














3.Q 








50 












39 


50 


39 


50 


60 






16 


23 




41 


327 








345 




60 


147 


333 


416 


242 


402 


155 


103 


61 


































29 


24 


29 


24 


62 












36 


186 








268 




13 


23 


205! 


254 


116 


206 






63 

m 


7 


14 


5 


13 


•3 


77 


288 


13 






393 


66 


111 


189 


626 


741 


510 


646 


233 


244 


64 








9 






71 








85 




19 


25 


82 


123 


73 


109 


65 










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95 








114 




29 


30 


117 


129 


103 


121 






66 


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16 


71 








119 




38 


98 


122 


169 


85 


140 


41 


49 


67 






5 


4 






51 


13 






38 




25 


36 


56 


44 






68 












45 












66 






153 


178 


153 


178 


96 


97 


69 






















37 








34 


37 


34 


37 


34 


37 


70 






























62 


61 


62 


61 


62 


61 



t Includes the following girls taking Industrial Education: Montgomery, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. — 8, Montgomery 
Blair Sr.— 31, Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr.— 3; Prince George's, Hyattsville Sr.-Jr.— 7, Maryland Park Sr.-Jr.— 23. 



230 



Eighty-Fourth Annual Report 



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INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 218-223 
Accreditation and certification, 31-36 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 142-144 
Expenditure, 210 
Per cent for, 140-141 
Superintendents, 3, 5-7, 205, 210 
Adult education, 130-132, 151, 154-155, 212 
Age-grade distribution, 68-69 
Agriculture, 42 

Adult education, 130-131 
Enrollment, 78-79, 89 

Each high school, 224-229 
Failures and withdrawals, 99 
Federal aid, 151-153, 155 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
State supervision, 3 
Teachers, 100 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution 
by type of fund : 
1949-1950, 138-139, 188, 206-207 
1923-1950, 136-137 
State teachers colleges, 179-180, 188-189 
Vocational education, 151-155, 188, 207 
Vocational rehabilitation, 135, 188 
Appropriations 
County 

1949-1950, 138-139, 164, 166-167, 188, 206, 
208 

1923-1950, 136-137 
State 

1949-1950, 138-139, 188, 206 

Art 

Enrollment, high school, 78-79, 90 
Each high school, 224-229 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 
Assessable basis, 168-170 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 202 

Average daily, 201 

Each high school, 218-223 

Index of elementary school, 60 

Per cent of, 58-61, 203 

Summer school pupils, 132 

Teachers at summer school, 106 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 55 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 145-148 

Expenditures for, 212, 214-217 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 



B 

Bands, orchestras, glee cluts, 92 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 188, 206 
Belonging, average number, 200 

Each high school, 218-223 

Per teacher, 121-122 
Birth rates, 56-57 

Board of Education, State, 3, 188-189 
Boards of Education, County, 5-7 
Bonds outstanding, school, 161 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 145, 147 
High, 146, 148 
Expenditures 

All schools. 211 
Elementary, 214, 216 
High, 215, 217 
Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Boys and girls 

Age-g»-ade distribution. 68-69 



B— (Continued) 

Enrollment 
By grade, 61 

Total 1 
Nonpublic school, 194-199 
Public school, 192-193 
Graduates, high school, 70-77, 218-223 
Budget (s) 

Baltimore City, county, and local 
1949-1950, 138-139, 164, 166-167, 209 
1923-1950, 136-137 
State public school, 188 
State teachers colleges, 188-189 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 
Number of, 125-129, 191 
Value of school, per pupil, 162-163 
Business education 
Adult, 130-132 

Enrollment, 78-79, 87, 91, 151-152, 155 

Each high school, 224-229 
Failures and withdrawals, 98 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
Teachers, 100 

c 

Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 213 

By type of school, 145-148, 160, 214-217 

By year, 1923-1950, 136-137 

Certificates held by county teachers, 107-111 

Certification and accreditation, 31-36 

Classes 

Evening school, 130-132, 212 
Size of, 121-122 

Special for handicapped, 53-54 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 132 

Clerks, county schools, 102, 205 

Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1949 entering, 73-77 

of 1950 entering State teachers colleges, 
71, 218-223 
Junior, 175, 177-178 
State teachers, 4, 173-180 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 104-105 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 124 

Transportation of pupils, 155-159 
Construction accounts, State teachers colleges, 

190 

Core program 

Enrollment, 78-79 

Each high school, 224-229 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high school 
pupils, 145-148 

By type of school, 144 

General control, 142, 144 • 

Individual high schools, 218-223 

State teachers colleges, 179 

Transported, 155, 158 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, and super- 
visors, 5-7 

Courses in individual high schools, 218-223 
Crippled children, services for, 53-54, 185 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 143-148 

Individual high schools, 218-223 
Expenditures 

All schools, 209 

By source of funds, 138-139 

By type of school, 214-217 

I 



232 



Index 



233 



D 

Dates 

Days in session, 48, 203 

Opening and closing of schools, 48 
Debt service 

1949-1950, 162, 164, 166-167, 213 
Tax rate for, 165 
Dental program, 186 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 44, 151-152, 155 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 93 

Schools offering, 100 

Teachers, 100 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 101, 205 
Employment of high school graduates, 72-77 
English, high school 
Enrollment, 78-79, 81 

Each high school, 224-229 
Failures and withdrawals, 98-99 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
Teachers, 100 
Enrollment 

Adult, 130, 132 
Atypical children, 55 
Elementary, 49, 52, 61-63, 192-199 
Grade or year, 61-63 
High school 

Course, each school, 219-223 
Growth in, 149-150 
Subjects, 78-79, 81-91, 93 

Each school, 224-229 
Year, 61-63, 80 

Each school, 218-223 
Increase in, 50-52 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 49. 51-52, 
194-199 

Public, 49-52, 61-63, 192-193 
State teachers colleges, 175-177 
Subject, high school, 78-79, 81-91, 93 

Each high school, 224-229 
Summary, 49-52 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 132 
Equalization fund, 138-139, 206 
Equivalence examinations, 133 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 130, 132 

Expenditures, 151, 154-155, 212 
Expenditures, 209-217 

(See also General control, Instruction, Op- 
eration, Maintenance, Auxiliary agencies, 
Fixed charges, Payments to adjoining 
counties, Current expenses, Debt service, 
Capital outlay) 

Elementary schools, 214, 216 

Evening schools, 151, 154-155, 212 

Health, 212 

High schools, 215, 217 

Libraries, 212 

Rehabilitation, 45-47 

Salaries 

All schools, 211 
Elementary, 214, 216 
High, 149-150, 215, 217 
Vocational, 151-155 

State teachers colleges, 179-180, 188-190 

Total, by major classifications, 188, 209 

Transportation, 155, 157, 212 

Vocational, Federal, 151-155, 207 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Federal aid 
Vocational education, 151-155, 188, 207 
Administration and supervision, 155 



F— (Continued) 

Salaries of teachers 

Baltimore City, 151-153 
County, day, 151-153 
County, evening, 151, 154 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 179-180, 188- 
189 

Financial statements 

County schools, 206-217 

State public schools, 188 

State teachers colleges, 188-190 
First grade, nonpromotions, 66 
Fixed charges, 212 
French 

Enrollment, 78-79, 88 

Each high school, 224-229 

Failures and withdrawals, 98 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 

G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 142, 144 

Expenditures, 210 

Per cent for, 140-141 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 92 
Grade enrollment, 61-63, 80 
Graduates 

High school, 70-77 

Entering State teachers colleges, 71, 73- 
74, 76-77 

From each school, 218-223 
Occupations of, 72-77 
State teachers colleges, 173-174 
Guidance, teachers of, 100 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 53, 188 

Home instruction, 53, 192-193 

Hospital schools, 53, 192-193 

Institutions for, 53, 55 

Opportunities for education of, 53-54 

Receipts from State for, 53, 188, 206 

Transportation of, 53 
Health 

Activities of State and County Departments 
of, 185-186 

Expenditures, all schools, 212 
Hearing, conservation of, 53-54 
High school equivalence examinations, 133 
High schools 

Aid for, 206 

Disbursements, 215, 217 

Individual, 218-229 

Supervision, 101, 205 
Home economics, 43-44 

Adult, 130-132, 151, 155 

Enrollment, 78-79, 89 

Each high school, 224-229 

Federal aid, 151-155 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 
Home instruction of pupils, 53, 192-193 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 53, 192-193 



I 

Immunizations, 185 
Income payments, per capita, 172 
Income tax, per capita, 171 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 166-167 
Index of school attendance, 60 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Industrial education, 43 
Instruction, 24-30 



234 



Index 



I — (Continued) 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 
Expenditures, 214-217 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 211 
State teachers colleges, 179-180 
Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 180 

J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, etc., 102 
Junior colleges, 175, 177-178 

K 

Kindergartens, 61-63 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Late entrants, elementary, 60 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 14-16 

Length of session, 48, 203 

Letter of transmittal, 9 

Levies, county, 164, 166-167 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 184, 211 

Public, 183, 230-231 

School, 184 

Library extension, 4, 37-41, 182-184, 188, 230- 
231 

Lip reading classes, 54 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 
Expenditures, 212, 214-217 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Materials of instruction and books (see Books 

and instructional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 78-79, 86-87 
Each high school, 224-229 

Failures and withdrawals, 98-99 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 185 

Teachers, 188 
Men teachers, 104, 204-205 
Mentally handicapped children, 53-54 
Minutes, State Board, 17-23 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 78-79, 90 

Each high school, 224-229 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 92 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult edu- 
cation) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 64-66 
First grade, 66 
Subject, high schools, 94-99 
Each subject, 98-99 
One or more subjects, 94-97 
Number belonging, 200 
Each high school, 218-223 
Per teacher, 121-122 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 55 
Having one teacher, 124 
Nonpublic, 49, 194-199 
Public, 49, 191 

Elementary, 124-126 
High, 127-129 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 72-77 
One-teacher schools 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 

Decrease in, 124 

Number belonging in, 124 
Per teacher, 121 

Number of, 124, 191 

Per cent of attendance in, 59 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 

Expenditures, 211, 214-217 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 92 
Over-age pupils, 67 



P 

Parent-teacher associations, 103 
Parochial and private schools, 49, 51-52, 194- 
199 

Part-payment of salaries, 206 

Payments to adjoining counties, 140-141 

Pensions, 181, 188 

Physical education and health, 185-186, 212 

Physical education and recreation 
Appropriations for, 188 
Enrollment, high school, 78-79, 90 

Each high school, 224-229 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
Teachers, 100 

Physical examinations (see Medical examina- 
tions) 

Physically handicapped children, 53-54 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 4 
Professional and clerical staff, counties, 205 
Private and parochial schools, 49, 51-52, 194- 
199 

Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 168-169 

School, 162-163 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-7 

Supervisors of, 101, 205 
Salaries of, 210 
Pupils 

Atypical, 55 

Nonpublic, 49, 51-52, 194-199 

One-teacher schools, 124 

Over-age, 67 

Per teacher, 121-122 

Public 

Enrollment, 49-52, 192-193 
Number attending, 201 
Number belonging, 200 
Per cent of attendance, 58-61, 203 
Transported, 155-157 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 208 

Federal government, 207 

Evening schools, counties, 154 
Teachers' salaries, counties, 151-155 
Vocational education, 151-155 

State 

Distributed by type of fund, 136-137, 188. 
206 

Total and per cent, 136-137 
Teachers colleges, 179-180, 188-189 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-4, 45-47, 134-135, 
188-189 

Repair, utility men, janitors, etc., 102 
Resignations, teachers, 112-114 
Retarded children, program for, 53-55 
Retirement system for teachers, 4, 181, 188 



Index 



235 



S 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 149-150 
Per cent of school budget, 140-141 
Superintendents, 210 
Supervisors, 211 

Pupil personnel, 211 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 121-122 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 
Total 

Elementary, 214, 216 
High, 149-150, 215, 217 
Vocational, 151-155 
Schools 

For atypical children, 55 
Number of, 49, 124-129, 191 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 78-79, 84-85 

Each high school, 224-229 
Failures and withdrawals, 98-99 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
Teachers, 100 
Session, length of, 48, 203 
Sex of teachers, 104, 204-205 
Sight conservation classes, 54 
Size of 

Classes, 121-122 
Schools 

Each high school, 218-223 
Elementary, 124-126 
High, 127-129 
Teaching staff, 124-125, 127, 129, 204-205 
Social studies 

Enrollment, 78-79, 82-83 

Each high school, 224-229 
Failures and withdrawals, 98-99 
Schools offering, 100, 224-229 
Teachers, 100 
Source of new teachers, 120 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 53-54, 188 

Special high school teachers, 100 

State 

Aid to schools 

1923-1950, 136-137 

Showing various school funds, 188, 206 
Board of Education, 3, 188 

Excerpts from minutes, 17-23 
Department of Education, 3-4, 188-189 
Department of Health, school activities, 185- 

186 

Income taxes, 171 

Public school budget, 188-189 

Superintendent's statement, 10-13 

Teachers colleges, 4, 71, 73-74, 76-77, 173- 
177, 179-180, 188-190, 218-223 

Teachers' retirement system, 4, 181, 188 
Statistical tables, 187-231 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping, 87, 91 
Subjects studied in high schools, 78-93 

Each high school, 224-229 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 106 

Pupils, 132 
Superintendents, 3-4, 5-7, 205 
Superintendent's statement, 10-13 
Supervision, supervisors 

Cost per pupil, 145-148 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 209 
By type of school, 214-217 

Names of, 3-4, 5-7 

Number of, 101, 205 

Per cent of current expense budget, 140-141 
Salaries of, 211, 214-217 
State, 3-4 

T 

Taxable basis. 168-170 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 140-141 
Tax rates, county, 165 



T— (Continued) 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 100 

Certification of, 31-36, 107-111 

Colleges, 4, 71, 73-74, 76-77, 173-177, 179- 

180, 188-190, 219-223 
Growth in number, 149-150 
Number of, 204-205 

For each high school subject, 100 
In each high school, 218-223 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 55 
Nonpublic, 194-199 
Public, 204-205 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 132 
Of atypical children, 55 
Pupils per, 121-122 
Resignations, 112-113 

Salaries, growth in high school, 149-150 

Sex of, 104, 204-205 

Source of, new to counties, 120 

Special subjects, high school, 100 

Summary, elementary and high, public and 

nonpublic, 49 
Summer school attendance, 106 
Training institutions, 173-177, 179-180, 188- 

190 

Turnover of, 112-119 
Withdrawals, by subjects taught, 114 
Teachers' retirement system 
Financial statement, 181, 188 
Staff, 4 

Teachers' contributions to, 181 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts), 43 

Adult, 130-132, 151, 154 

Enrollment, 78-79, 89, 152-153 
Each high school, 224-229 

Federal aid, 151-155 

Schools offering, 100, 224-229 

Teachers, 100 
Training centers, State teachers colleges, 175- 

176 

Transmittal, letter of, 9 
Transportation of pupils, 155-159, 212 

Cost, total and per pupil, 155, 157-15S, 212 

Per cent transported, 155-156 
Tuition charges, State teachers colleges, 179- 

180 

Turnover in teaching staff, 112-119 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 168-170 

School property, 162-163 
Vocational education, 3, 5-7, 42-44, 151-155, 

188, 207 

Agriculture, 42 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 78-79, 89, 152, 153, 224-229 
Evening schools, 130-132, 154 

Federal aid, 151-155, 188, 207 

Home economics, 43-44 

State aid, 188 

Trades and industries, 43 
Vocational guidance, 100, 155 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-4, 45-47, 134-135, 

188 

w 

War emergency certificates, 107-111 
Wealth back of each pupil, 170 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 60 ~ 

High, 98-99 
Withdrawals of teachers, 112-113 

By subjects taught, 114 

Y 

Ye-r, length of school, 48, 203 



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